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Category : Nanomedicine

Growth in the Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021

This Nanomedicine market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the right and valuable information. The data which has been looked upon is done considering both, the existing top players and the upcoming competitors. Business strategies of the key players and the new entering market industries are studied in detail. Well explained SWOT analysis, revenue share and contact information are shared in this report analysis.

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Data integration and capabilities are analyzed to support the findings and study the predicted geographical segmentations. Various key variables and regression models were considered to calculate the trajectory of Nanomedicine market. Detailed analysis is explained and given importance to with best working models.

Geographically, the segmentation is done into several key regions like North America, Middle East & Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe and Latin America. The production, consumption, revenue, shares in mill UDS, growth rate of Nanomedicine market during the forecast period of 2017 to 2021 is well explained.

The ongoing market trends of Nanomedicine market and the key factors impacting the growth prospects are elucidated. With increase in the trend, the factors affecting the trend are mentioned with perfect reasons. Top manufactures, price, revenue, market share are explained to give a depth of idea on the competitive side.

Each and every segment type and their sub types are well elaborated to give a better idea about this market during the forecast period of 2017 to 2021 respectively.

Download sample pages of this report:http://tinyurl.com/y7bs9wea

About Us:Key Market Insights is a stand-alone organization with a solid history of advancing and exchanging market research reports and logical surveys delivered by our numerous transnational accomplices, which incorporate both huge multinationals and littler, more expert concerns.

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Growth in the Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

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Are nano drug delivery and telehealth solutions a deadly combo for disease? – EPM Magazine

Incorporating telehealth solutions into new drug delivery technologies like nanomedicines can potentially give pharmaceuticals the edge they need to win the fight against disease.

Creating drug delivery systems that utilise telehealth solutions like smartphone technologies, Bluetooth, IoT, wearable technologies, and AI would help pharmaceutical companies save money in clinical trials by reducing the financial burden caused by poor medical adherence and provide better patient outcomes through real-time data analysis. Telehealth solutions provide physicians and clinical trial scientists direct access to their patient, and can provide them with valuable data that will improve their performance and the patients health. Access to real-time patient health data is an opportunity for pharmaceutical companies to develop a range of smart drug delivery systems that could potentially change the way an estimated 50% of the population deal with their chronic diseases.

With large numbers living with some form of chronic disease, pharmaceutical companies must incorporate telehealth tech into their drug delivery systems to collect real-time data and use the data to improve patient treatment, clinical trial outcomes and apply the data for further research.

The drug delivery systems available in todays market are honestly not that impressive. A Bluetooth-enabled inhaler, smart automatic injectors, and smart pills are definitely technologies that benefit patient care but lack innovative pizzazz. Bluetooth technology was first introduced in mobile phones in 2000. It has taken 17 years to implement the data-gathering technology into an inhaler/auto injector, often at times requiring user actions like downloading from an SD card. I am surprised it has taken this long for pharma to get where it is today, but there is truly hope on the horizon, with recent advancements in nanotechnology.

The future of pharmaceuticals and population health lies in the utilisation of telehealth solutions like the Internet of Nano Things (IoNT), wearables, smartphones and the latest drug delivery tech likesmart nanoplatforms, nanoparticles/nanomedicines, and nanosensors. These recent technological advancements in drug delivery should change the way we understand and cure diseases.

Northwestern University has developed a nanoplatform that can assess the effectiveness of nanomaterials in regulating gene expression. The nanoplatform allows scientists to observe nanomedicines and particle behaviour in an in vivo setting. Theres no doubt that the relationship between nanomedicines and IoNT is inevitable however there are issues like patient health risks and security that must be taken into account.

Whenever the internet is involved, the issue of security should be raised. Are nanomedicines saving patients lives, while also putting them at risk of body hacking? Although programmable particles are sending signals from within the patients body and providing beneficial information for the doctor/scientist, the idea that a signal can be hacked is a horrific reality. Nanoparticle manipulation is possible by gaining access to the particles using ultrasound and electromagnetic field waves making hacking feasible but extremely difficult and complex. The next question is what happens to the nanoparticles after treatment? Will they pose a later threat and become an access point for hackers?

Nanomedicines, after entering the human body, travel throughout reaching the organs, the bloodstream, the lungs and even crossing the semi-permeable membranes into cells delivering the drugs to exactly the right place at the right time. Their disbursement depends on size and programming. Nanoparticles are metal-based, carbon-based, composites, and dendrimers, and are excreted from the body via faeces and urine. The liver and spleen can also decompose them, however up to 30% can remain in the body for an extended period of time and potentially become an access point for hacking.

Combining telehealth solutions and nanomedicines will benefit the populations health by presenting effective treatments for chronic and deadly pathologies and provide scientists and doctors previously unattainable data for analysis. This previously elusive data has become available thanks to Northwestern Universitys Nanoplatform, which successfully provides imaging of the nanomedicines effectiveness on the MGMT gene, a chemo-resistant cancer gene. This data has already provided a better understanding of the nanomedicines mechanics and provided researchers with the best time, after treatment with nanomedicines, to administer chemotherapy.

Nanoparticles appear to be a solution that can improve the health of the population, however there are still potential risks for patients. Although most nanoparticles are tested in labs and in vitro, a few potential health risks have been observed. Risks like the creation of a protein corona (a shifting population of different molecules) can influence the immune defence system and mistakenly allow the corona to penetrate good non-targeted tissues. The clumping of protein molecules can also be linked to multiple pathologies, including amyloidosis. Some nanoparticles have also been linked to genetic mutations, DNA damage, and chromosomal alterations, however they are rarely attributed to all three at once. It is quite clear that more research and testing is required to truly understand the future of nanomedicine and its effects on the human body.

Nanomedicines target a specific area within the body, can delay activation and have the potential to relay real-time data for analysis. Scientists and doctors can finally have a real-time view of their treatments and understand the pathology and its interaction with the medicines, leading to data that will help the healthcare industry save lives, defeat disease, and save money. The benefits in combining telehealth solutions with nano drug delivery systems is evident and it is the colossal leap forward that the industry has been looking for in the never-ending fight with diseases like cancer.

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Are nano drug delivery and telehealth solutions a deadly combo for disease? – EPM Magazine

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Growth in Nanomedicine market-2017 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

The report firstly introduced the Nanomedicine basics: definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the worlds main region market conditions, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry growth rate etc. In the end, the report introduced new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.

Download sample pages of this report: http://www.kminsights.com/request-sample-1892

Nanomedicine is a branch of medicine that applies the knowledge and tools of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease. Nanomedicine involves the use of nanoscale materials, such as biocompatible nanoparticles and nanorobots, for diagnosis, delivery, sensing or actuation purposes in a living organism.

The ongoing market trends of Nanomedicine market and the key factors impacting the growth prospects are elucidated. With increase in the trend, the factors affecting the trend are mentioned with perfect reasons. Top manufactures, price, revenue, market share are explained to give a depth of idea on the competitive side.

Each and every segment type and their sub types are well elaborated to give a better idea about this market during the forecast period of 2017respectively.

Download sample pages of this report: http://www.kminsights.com/request-sample-1892

About Us:Key Market Insights is a stand-alone organization with a solid history of advancing and exchanging market research reports and logical surveys delivered by our numerous transnational accomplices, which incorporate both huge multinationals and littler, more expert concerns.

Contact:sales@kminsights.com+1 (888) 278-7681

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Growth in Nanomedicine market-2017 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

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Nanomedicine applications in the treatment of breast cancer: current state of the art – Dove Medical Press

Back to Browse Journals International Journal of Nanomedicine Volume 12

Di Wu, Mengjie Si, Hui-Yi Xue, Ho-Lun Wong

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women worldwide, but the current drug therapy is far from optimal as indicated by the high death rate of breast cancer patients. Nanomedicine is a promising alternative for breast cancer treatment. Nanomedicine products such as Doxil and Abraxane have already been extensively used for breast cancer adjuvant therapy with favorable clinical outcomes. However, these products were originally designed for generic anticancer purpose and not specifically for breast cancer treatment. With better understanding of the molecular biology of breast cancer, a number of novel promising nanotherapeutic strategies and devices have been developed in recent years. In this review, we will first give an overview of the current breast cancer treatment and the updated status of nanomedicine use in clinical setting, then discuss the latest important trends in designing breast cancer nanomedicine, including passive and active cancer cell targeting, breast cancer stem cell targeting, tumor microenvironment-based nanotherapy and combination nanotherapy of drug-resistant breast cancer. Researchers may get insight from these strategies to design and develop nanomedicine that is more tailored for breast cancer to achieve further improvements in cancer specificity, antitumorigenic effect, antimetastasis effect and drug resistance reversal effect.Keywords: nanomedicine, breast cancer, targeted delivery, drug therapy, drug resistance, tumor microenvironment

This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License.By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

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Nanomedicine applications in the treatment of breast cancer: current state of the art – Dove Medical Press

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Lungs in space: research project could lead to new lung therapeutics – Phys.Org

Space travel can cause a lot of stress on the human body as the change in gravity, radiation and other factors creates a hostile environment. While much is known about how different parts of the body react in space, how lungs are affected by spaceflight has received little attention until now, say researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Houston Methodist Research Institute.

That will change, though, once their research project, which aims to grow lungs in space, reaches the International Space Station. UTMB and HMRI researchers say what they learn from the study could have real implications for astronauts, as well as those still on Earth, and could lead to future therapeutics.

“We know a lot about what happens in space to bones, muscle, the heart and the immune system, but nobody knows much about what happens to the lungs,” said Joan Nichols, a professor of Internal Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology, and associate director for research and operations for the Galveston National Laboratory at UTMB. “We know that there are some problems with lungs in space flight, but that hasn’t been closely looked into. We hope to find out how lung cells react to the change in gravity and the extreme space environment, and then that can help us protect astronauts in space, as well as the lungs of regular people here on Earth.”

This investigation represents the third of four collaborative projects currently active at the HMRI’s Center for Space Nanomedicine. The center, directed by Alessandro Grattoni, chairman and associate professor of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI, focuses on the investigation of nanotechnology-based strategies for medicine on Earth and in space. The research is supported by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, NASA and HMRI.

Scientists from UTMB and HMRI prepared bioreactor pouches that include lung progenitor and stem cells and pieces of lung scaffolding. The scaffolding is the collagen and elastin frame on which lung cells grow. Space X successfully launched the payload containing these pouches Aug. 14 on its 12th Commercial Resupply Services mission (CRS-12) from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and is expected to arrive at the International Space Station Aug. 16. Once on the ISS, the cells are expected to grow on the scaffold in a retrofitted bioreactor.

Once the lung cells have returned to Earth, researchers will look for the development of fibrosis, the structure of the tissues and the response of immune cells, among other changes and damage that could occur to the lung cells. Lung injuries have been found to accelerate in space, and it is through close study of those cells that therapeutics hopefully could be developed.

Nichols and Dr. Joaquin Cortiella, a professor and director of the Lab of Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration at UTMB, have successfully grown lungs in their lab in Galveston, but now they will see if astronauts can do the same in zero gravity. Jason Sakamoto, affiliate professor and former co-chair of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI, has applied his novel organ decellularization process and nanotechnology-based delivery systems to support this overall lung regeneration effort.

“We have experience working with the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space to study our nanotechnologies in action on the International Space Station,” Grattoni said. “However, we are extremely excited to be a part of this clinical study, since it may play a pivotal role in how we approach future space travel in terms of preserving astronaut health. What we learn during this fundamental experiment could lead to science-fiction-like medical advancements, where organ regeneration becomes a reality in both deep space and here on Earth.”

Researchers at HMRI will take the results from UTMB and work on developing therapeutics that could help astronauts, as well as people on Earth.

“This exploration will provide fundamental insight for the collaborative development of cell-based therapies for autoimmune diseases, hormone deficiencies and other issues,” Grattoni said.

Explore further: Image: Testing astronauts’ lung health

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Lungs in space: research project could lead to new lung therapeutics – Phys.Org

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siRNA Treatment for Brain Cancer Stops Tumor Growth in Mouse Model – Technology Networks

Early phase Northwestern Medicine research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.

The strategy involves using lipid polymer-based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs).

BTICs are malignant brain tumor populations that underlie the therapy resistance, recurrence and unstoppable invasion commonly encountered by glioblastoma patients after the standard treatment regimen of surgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy, explained the studys first author, Dou Yu, MD, PhD, research assistant professor of Neurological Surgery.

Using mouse models of brain tumors implanted with BTICs derived from human patients, the scientists injected nanoparticles containing small interfering RNA (siRNA) short sequences of RNA molecules that reduce the expression of specific cancer-promoting proteins directly into the tumor. In the new study, the strategy stopped tumor growth and extended survival when the therapy was administered continuously through an implanted drug infusion pump.

This major progress, although still at a conceptual stage, underscores a new direction in the pursuit of a cure for one of the most devastating medical conditions known to mankind, said Yu, who collaborated on the research with principal investigator Maciej Lesniak, MD, Michael J. Marchese Professor of Neurosurgery and chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery.

Glioblastoma is particularly difficult to treat because its genetic makeup varies from patient to patient. This new therapeutic approach would make it possible to deliver siRNAs to target multiple cancer-causing gene products simultaneously in a particular patients tumor.

In this study, the scientists tested siRNAs that target four transcription factors highly expressed in many glioblastoma tissues but not all. The therapy worked against classes of glioblastoma BTICs with high levels of those transcription factors, while other classes of the cancer did not respond.

This paints a picture for personalized glioblastoma therapy regimens based on tumor profiling, Yu said. Customized nanomedicine could target the unique genetic signatures in any specific patient and potentially lead to greater therapeutic benefits.

The strategy could also apply to other medical conditions related to the central nervous system not just brain tumors.

Degenerative neurological diseases or even psychiatric conditions could potentially be the therapeutic candidates for this multiplexed delivery platform, Yu said.

Before scientists can translate this proof-of-concept research to humans, they will need to continue refining the nanomedicine platform and evaluating its long-term safety. Still, the findings from this new research provide insight for further investigation.

Nanomedicine provides a unique opportunity to advance a therapeutic strategy for a disease without a cure. By effectively targeting brain tumor-initiating stem cells responsible for cancer recurrence, this approach opens up novel translational approaches to malignant brain cancer, Lesniak summed up.

This article has been republished frommaterialsprovided by Northwestern University. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference

Dou Yu, Omar F. Khan, Mario L. Suv, Biqin Dong, Wojciech K. Panek, Ting Xiao, Meijing Wu, Yu Han, Atique U. Ahmed, Irina V. Balyasnikova, Hao F. Zhang, Cheng Sun, Robert Langer, Daniel G. Anderson, Maciej S. Lesniak. Multiplexed RNAi therapy against brain tumor-initiating cells via lipopolymeric nanoparticle infusion delays glioblastoma progression. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201701911 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701911114

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siRNA Treatment for Brain Cancer Stops Tumor Growth in Mouse Model – Technology Networks

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Targeting tumours: IBBME researchers investigate biological barriers to nanomedicine delivery – U of T Engineering News

For cancer patients, understanding the odds of a treatments success can be bewildering. The same drug, applied to the same type of cancer, might be fully successful on one persons tumour and do nothing for another one. Physicians are often unable to explain why.

Now, U of T Engineering researchers are beginning to understand one of the reasons.Abdullah Syed and Shrey Sindhwani, both PhD candidates,and their colleagues at the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) have created a technology to watch nanoparticles traveling into tumours revealing barriers that prevent their delivery to targets and the variability between cancers.

The biggest thing weve noticed is that nanoparticles face multiple challenges posed by the tumour itself on their way to cancer cells, says Sindhwani, an MD-PhD student in the Integrated Nanotechnology & Biomedical Sciences Laboratory of Professor Warren Chan (IBBME). Syed and Sindhwani co-published their findings online June 22, and on the cover of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. So the treatment might work for a while or worse, theres just enough of the drug for the cancer to develop resistance. This could be prevented if we can figure out the ways in which these barriers stop delivery and distribution of the drug throughout the cancer.

Tiny nanoparticles offer great hope for the treatment of cancer and other disease because of their potential to deliver drugs to targeted areas in the body, allowing more precise treatments with fewer side effects. But so far the technology hasnt lived up to its promise, due to delivery and penetration problems.

To dismantle this roadblock, the two graduate students searched for a way to better view the particles journey inside tumours. They discovered that the tough-to-see particles could be illuminated by scattering light off their surfaces.

The sensitivity of our imaging is about 1.4 millionfold higher, says Syed. First, we make the tissue transparent, then we use the signal coming from the particles to locate them. We shine a light on the particles and it scatters the light. We capture this scattering light to learn the precise location of the nanoparticles.

It was already understood that nanoparticles were failing to accumulate in tumours, thanks to a meta-analysis of the field done by Chans group. But the researchers have developed technologies to look at nanoparticle distribution in 3D, which provides a much fuller picture of how the particles are interacting with the rest of the tumour biology. The goal is to use this technology to gather knowledge for developing mathematical principles of nanoparticle distribution in cancer, similar to the way principles exist for understanding the function of the heart, says Syed.

And because each tumour is unique, this technology and knowledge base should help future scientists to understand the barriers to drug delivery on a personalized basis, and to develop custom treatments.

The next step is to understand what in cancers biology stops particles from fully penetrating tumours and then to develop ways to bypass cancers defences.

But the technology is also useful for diseases other than cancer. With the help of Professor Jennifer Gommerman, an researcher in the Department of Immunology who studies multiple sclerosis (MS), Syed and Sindhwani captured 3D images of lesions in a mouse model mimicking MS using nanoparticles.

This is going to be very valuable to anyone trying to understand disease or the organ system more deeply, says Sindhwani. And once we understand barriers that dont allow drugs to reach their disease site, we can start knocking them down and improving patient health adds Syed.

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Targeting tumours: IBBME researchers investigate biological barriers to nanomedicine delivery – U of T Engineering News

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‘Nanomedicine’: Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in-Canada – CTV News

It’s rare for researchers to discover a new class of drugs, but a University of Calgary microbiology professor recently did so — by accident and now hopes to revolutionize autoimmune disease treatment.

In 2004, Dr. Pere Santamaria and his research lab team at the Cumming School of Medicine conducted an experiment to image a mouse pancreas, using nanoparticles coated in pancreatic proteins.

The work didnt go as planned.

Our experiment was a complete failure, he recently told CTV Calgary. We were actually quite depressed, frustrated about the outcome of that.

But the team was surprised to discover the nanoparticles had a major effect on the mice: resetting their immune systems.

The team realized that, by using nanoparticles, they can deliver disease-specific proteins to white blood cells, which will then go on to reprogram the cells to actively suppress the disease.

Whats more, the nanoparticles stop the disease without compromising the immune system, as current treatments often do.

Santamarias team believes nanomedicine drugs can be modified to treat all kinds of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Convinced that nanomedicine has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry, Santamaria founded a company to explore the possibilities, called Parvus Therapeutics Inc.

This past spring, Novartis, one of the worlds largest pharmaceutical companies, entered into a license and collaboration agreement with Parvus to fund the process of developing nanomedicine.

Under the terms of the agreement, Parvus will receive research funding to support its clinical activities, while Novartis receives worldwide rights to use Parvus technology to develop and commercialize products for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Its a good partnership, Santamaria said in a University of Calgary announcement. Bringing a drug to market requires science as well as money.

Santamaria cant say how long it might be before nanomedicine can be used to create human therapies, but he says everyone involved is working aggressively to make it happen.

With a report from CTV Calgarys Kevin Fleming

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‘Nanomedicine’: Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in-Canada – CTV News

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UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes – UCalgary News

When Dr. Pere Santamaria arrived in Calgary in 1992 to join the Cumming School of Medicine, he never could have imagined he would make a groundbreaking discovery that would lead to a spinoff company. When I arrived, I found out that the grant money I was expecting hadnt come through, says Santamaria, a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. So I had an empty lab with no research assistants and no salary. I had to beg my supervisor to give me $10,000 to start my research.

Despite the rocky start, Santamaria has achieved something many scientists dream of making a discovery that has practical applications for health care. Santamarias discovery revolves around the use of nanoparticles coated in proteins to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

They can be modified for different diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis without compromising the entire immune system, Santamaria explains. Instead, they basically work to reset the immune system.

Nanomedicines unique mechanism has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry entirely. Developing a new class of drugs is rare. With the assistance of Innovate Calgary, Santamaria started a company, Parvus Therapeutics Inc., to represent the technology and explore ways of bringing it to market. Announced in April 2017, Parvus entered into an exclusive deal with the Swiss pharma giant Novartis, hopefully leading to the development and commercialization of Parvuss nanomedicine to treat Type 1 diabetes.

Its a good partnership, Santamaria says. Bringing a drug to market requires science as well as money.

Supporting commercialization should be a top priority for all research, he continues. Our biggest responsibility is to the patients and making sure they have access to the medicine they need. With that in mind, Santamaria shares his insight for other researchers who may be interested in bringing their discoveries from the lab bench to the market.

If youre interested in investigating spin-out opportunities, get in touch with Innovate Calgary, which offers mentors, coaching, business skill development programs, intellectual property services and other back-office support.

Throughout the years, Santamarias work has been funded by numerous organizations, including Diabetes Canada, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Diabetes Association, Foothills.He is a member of the Snyder Institute and associate member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute.Santamaria named his company Parvus from the Greek word meaning small.

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UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes – UCalgary News

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‘Blazing the trail’: University of Calgary research could lead to cures for autoimmune diseases – CBC.ca

Researchers at the University of Calgary say their work in the field of “nanomedicine”could lead to cures for Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and many more diseases.

Dr. Pere Santamaria said the process involves “nanoparticles” thousands of times smaller than a typicalhuman cell that could be used to stop the body from attacking itself.

That, he said, could potentially lead to cures for autoimmunedisorders.

“There are no drugs that can do that today,”said Santamaria, aprofessor ofimmunology at the University of Calgary.

“Other drugs that are being used to treat chronic inflammatory disorders impair the ability of the immune system to do its job, so there are secondary effects and longterm complications our drugs don’t do that.”

Pharmaceutical company Novartis has partnered with Santamaria’s own company, Parvus Therapeutics, to work on developing the nanomedicines and take the drugs to market.

Now with support and funding, Santamariasaid the new drug”has the potential to revolutionizemedicine” if the drugs pass clinical testing.

Santamariasaid autoimmune disordersarecaused by white blood cells attacking the tissues in a person’sown body.

Pharmaceutical company Novartis has partnered with Dr. Santamaria’s Parvus Therapeutics to work on developing nanomedicines to cure autoimmune disorders and take the drugs to market. (CBC)

Type 1 diabetesis treatable with insulin, but there is no cure. It’s the same for many other diseases.

“Our drugs aim to resolve the inflammation of the tissue, the attack of the tissue, and resolve that process altogether,” Santamaria said.

He said the nanoparticles could halt disorders without impairing the rest of the immune system.

“So we can reset the immune system to its steady state that means the healthy state without impairing the ability of our immune system to protect us against infections and cancer,”Santamariasaid.

Santamaria said the nanoparticleswere discovered during an experiment years ago, and the initialtestresults”made nosensewhatsoever.” Since that day, the nanomedicines havebeen in development and he credits the progress to curiosity.

“We almost shoved them under the rug,” Santamaria said.”We didn’t do that. Fortunately, we were pursued wth curiosity of researching.”

Santamaria said the process of taking a discovery from the research laboratory to the marketplace is enormously complex and the drug has yet to go through preclinical trials.

Because nanomedicine is such a new field of research, there is no firm timeline on when the medicinescould be available if they pass human trials.

“Our nanomedicineis a new class of drug … so we’re basically blazing the trail,” Santamaria said.

“We hope that we can carry that torch and be an example for all the investigators that might follow suit, that may run into discoveries such as the ones that we’ve made and hopefully they can follow in our footsteps.”

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‘Blazing the trail’: University of Calgary research could lead to cures for autoimmune diseases – CBC.ca

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