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Category : Testosterone Physicians

Testosterone Replacement Therapy – Royal Medical Center

There are three main medications for testosterone treatment

Testosterone is used to increase and optimize hormone levels. The dosage varies and is determined by the prescribing physician. A patients medical history, lab results and physical are all factored in during diagnosis.HCG is used to prevent testicular shrinkage and maintain the natural production of the hormone in the testes.An Estrogen Blocker is used to control the levels of estrogen in mens bodies.

Our doctors have designed a safe and proven program for our patients to maximize life-changing benefits, including

Improved sexual performance

Improves skin tone and elasticity

increases energy and stamina

These benefits are seen when low hormone levels are treated in hypogonadal and andropausal men. Follow-up is the key to success for our patients and Royal Medical Center

90 days after beginning the powerful hormone replacement therapy program, the patient will be required to follow up with additional labs. This is to determine that the diagnosis and dosages are on target. If we are not pleased with your levels, the regimen will be altered to suit the best results for the patient.

Physicals will be conducted at least once a year or per request by the physician.

*Patients using testosterone supplements should seek medical attention immediately is symptoms of a heart attack or stroke are present, such as:

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Testosterone Replacement Therapy – Royal Medical Center

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Testosterone Replacement: Options for Treatment Have …

The first thing to understand about testosterone replacement is that oral testosterone (pills taken by mouth) doesnt really work because it is broken down so quickly by the liver. The solution to this problem involves patches, gels, shots, and even nasal sprays. Here are your options, with some new players in the game.

Androderm patches are meant to be worn on the arm or torso. Androderm patches deliver approximately 5 mg of testosterone per 24 hours and result in normal testosterone levels in the majority of hypogonadal men. These have been around for a while.

Four testosterone gels are available: AndroGel, Testim, Fortesta, and Axiron.

The option of intramuscular injections is a good one, though it requires office visits. Injections are usually given one shot of 100 mg, once a week for 12 weeks. Regimens of 300 mg every three weeks and 400 mg every four weeks can also be used. An advantage of the shots for men is the freedom from daily administration of a gel or patch, while the disadvantages are the need for a shot of an oily solution every one to three weeks.

Natestois the first nasaltestosteronegel approved in the United States for the treatment of male hypogonadism andtestosteronedeficiency.Natestois a metered-dose pump applicator that places the gel into the nostrils.

The good thing?Because this gel is applied inside of the nostril, there is little chance of transferringtestosteroneto women or children who come into close physical contact with the person using the intranasal gel. That can occur with the gels and patches used on the skin.

There are some disadvantages.Some men wont like that it needs to be used three times daily. People with allergies or underlying nasal or sinus problems also may not likeNatestoas a runny nose, sore throatand sinusitis are among the most common side effects.

Thoughts?

Dr. O.

Most options for testosterone replacement are considered Tier 2 drugs by many insurance plans, though they may fall under higher copays or may not be covered with some plans. Androderm patches and all gel options run about $550-$600 per month or per prescription (for 30 patches or one container of gel). Testosterone shots are significantly less expensive, with generic versions sometimes available for as little as $20 per dose.

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Testosterone Replacement: Options for Treatment Have …

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Testosterone Replacement Therapy | Titan Men’s Health

League City & Friendswood Testosterone Therapy

Welcome to Titan T-Center & Weight Loss, League City and Friendswood, Texas finest testosterone replacement therapy clinic. Our clinic is outfitted with the latest technologies to provide our patients with efficient,safe and accurate results. In addition to our modern equipment, the medical professionals at our facilityare some of the most skilled and knowledgeable individuals in the industry. To all of us here, providing premier testosterone therapy requires more than just basic medical treatment. Our staff believes in building relationships and improving the lives of each and every individual that walks through our door.

Low testosterone, or hypogonadism, is a condition in which the bodys natural production of the hormone is below normal levels. By the age of 30, it is very common for men to begin seeing a decline in testosterone. Men may see a variety of symptoms, including but not limited to, a decrease in sex drive. Although age plays a factor in the production of testosterone, diabetes and excessive weight, have been associated with the condition as well.

Although testosterone supplements may be available in several forms, testosterone injections are believed to be safer and more effective than a pill. Oral testosterone is available, however, it is believed that testosterone taken orally may damage the liver. Furthermore, testosterone injections go directlyinto thebloodstream, making each treatment more effective.

Titan T-Center & Weight Loss is here to help you determine whether or not youmay be in need of therapy to lift your testosterone levels. We encourage you to look through the rest of our website to learn more about low t and its impact on your day-to-day life. Should you have any questions or if you would like to come in for a visit, contact us your convenience. Titan T-Center serves patients residing all over the League City and Friendswood areas.

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Testosterone Replacement Therapy | Titan Men’s Health

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

The Definitive Testosterone Replacement Therapy MANual …

Praise for The Definitive Testosterone Replacement MANual

“Inspiring is Jay’s knowledge of hormone replacement and human physiology, which surpasses that of many of my medical colleagues. This he brings to you the reader in the pages of his much-needed and timely opus. Open your eyes, read and digest Jay’s words. This book is the chapter that I was scared to write.”

Brett Osborn, MD Diplomate, American Board of Neurological Surgery Diplomate, American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine CSCS, National Strength and Conditioning Association, Author of Get Serious, A Neurosurgeon’s Guide To Optimal Health and Fitness

“The Definitive Testosterone Replacement MANual presents practical information about the best ways to maximize benefits and minimize side effects of testosterone replacement therapy. It accomplishes this goal in the most visually appealing way I have ever seen in this field. This book makes for an enjoyable and highly empowering read for any man who wants to take charge of his health and quality of life.”

Nelson Vergel CEO, ExcelMale.com and DiscountedLabs.com, Author of Testosterone A Man’s Guide: Practical Tips For Boosting Physical, Mental and Sexual Vitality

Is your sex drive at its peak, or has it diminished? Is your enthusiasm for life lessening?

Healthy testosterone levels are not only a physical state of prime health, but a mental state of positive wellness and aggression.

A man with low testosterone will experience not only a physical decline, but also a diminished quality of life.

Testosterone is often misrepresented by the media at large as inciting “hostility”, or its effects are reduced down to building muscle only, and its portrayed as being detrimental to health. Nothing could be further from the truth. Comprehensive clinical evidence has unequivocally demonstrated that healthy testosterone levels not only slow the aging process and improve physical markers of health, but that they also reduce the possibility of degenerative disease, and by extension vastly improve quality of life.

Men NEED Optimal Testosterone Levels to age powerfully and live to their maximum potential.

The Definitive Testosterone Replacement Therapy MANual is the first book of its kind covering not only the therapeutic practice and application of TRT, but the historical, sociological, and biological issues that inform its usage.

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Myth about Testosterone Replacement and Prostate Cancer – page 2

The Memorial Sloan Kettering Experience

I was still giddy when I decided to look up the article detailing the experience of testosterone administration to men with metastatic disease from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute, published in 1981 by the urologic giant of his day, Willet Whitmore, and his colleague, Jackson Fowler. The short summary of the paper was quite damning. Over a course of eighteen years, fifty-two men with metastatic disease had undergone treatment with daily T injections, usually as a last-gasp treatment for their cancer. Of these fifty-two men, forty-five had experienced an unfavorable response, most within the first month of treatment.

This seemed pretty grim. Maybe Huggins had been right after all, despite basing his conclusions on a solitary patient. But then I discovered something equally shocking in the fine print of this article. Of the fifty-two men studied, all but four had already been treated with castration or estrogen treatment to lower testosterone. And of these four previously untreated men, one had an early, unspecified unfavorable response, while the remaining three men continued to receive daily T injections for 52, 55, and 310 days without apparent negative effects. In fact, one of these men was reported to have had a favorable response to T administration.

Drs. Fowler and Whitmore were impressed by the difference in outcomes for the untreated group of four men compared with the men who had already undergone hormonal treatment to lower testosterone. To explain the lack of negative effects on the untreated men, the authors postulated the following: Normal endogenous testosterone levels may be sufficient to cause near maximal stimulation of prostatic tumors. In other words, raising testosterone levels beyond the normal range did not seem to cause any increased cancer growth, even in men with metastatic disease!

This important concept was lost in the headline of the study, which clearly indicated that giving testosterone to men with prostate cancer was associated with rapid onset of negative consequences in most men. One had to read the article closely to learn that the headline applied only to men who had been previously castrated. Although this article has been cited for many years as evidence that T administration causes rapid and near-universal growth of prostate cancer (PCa), the authors in fact clearly made the point that the worrisome effects of T administration did not appear to occur in their small group of men without prior hormonal treatment.

It had been an amazing day in the library, which had long since turned to night. My head was spinning, but I wanted to tackle the last hurdle, the problem of testosterone flare. In the early 1980s, medications were developed to replace the need for surgical removal of the testicles for men with advanced prostate cancer. These medications are called LHRH agonists, and they continue to be used to this day. LHRH injections cause T concentrations to increase by 50 percent or more for seven to ten days, after which testosterone levels fall rapidly to castrate levels. This transient rise in testosterone is called testosterone flare.

Not long after LHRH agonists began to be used, there were reports of complications occurring after men began these treatments, and these complications were attributed to testosterone flare causing rapid growth of prostate cancer. These complications included the inability to urinate, worsening of bone pain, or, in the most tragic cases, paralysis due to collapse of a vertebra in which the cancer had eaten away the bone. As a result, for the last twenty years, it has been routine to add medications to block testosterone flare when starting a patient on treatment with LHRH agonists.

That night in the basement of Countway Library, I pulled all the original studies I could find of LHRH agonists, as well as reports of bad outcomes due to the flare. As I read, two things became apparent. First, many of the bad outcomes attributed to testosterone flare occurred a month or more after initiation of treatment. This meant that these complications occurred not when testosterone levels were high, but when testosterone levels had already dropped for some time to castrate levels.

Second, out of the substantial literature on LHRH agonists and prostate cancer, I could find only two articles that actually measured and reported PSA levels during the time of the testosterone flare. And here was the kicker: both articles showed absolutely no change in mean PSA values during the time of the testosterone flare! Curiously, neither article so much as mentioned this result.

PSA is an excellent indicator of prostate cancer growth. The fact that PSA did not rise in these men during the testosterone flare strongly suggested that the cancers did not grow during this time. Perhaps the complications attributed to testosterone flare were nothing more than the cancer progression that would have happened without any treatment at all.

It had been quite a day and night in the Countway Library. I left with my head spinning and a feeling that I had stumbled onto something very important. It was like the childrens story The Emperors New Clotheswe see what we want to see. And for two-thirds of a century, it had been assumed that raising testosterone increased prostate cancer growth. But maybe the emperor was naked.

Even in men with metastatic disease, there was no evidence I could find that raising testosterone made prostate cancer grow more than it would have anyway. Shockingly, the very publications cited so regularly to demonstrate a dangerous relationship between testosterone and prostate cancer contained evidence that this was not true.

Still, I was worried, because there was a bothersome unresolved paradox to explain. For decades, the storyline was that lowering testosterone levels caused prostate cancer to shrink away and raising testosterone levels caused it grow. The second part of this story was now seriously in doubt, yet the first part was obviously correct. In my own practice, I had seen the beneficial effects of lowering testosterone levels many times over in men with advanced prostate cancer. This part of Dr. Hugginss work was indisputable. But if lowering testosterone levels caused these cancers to shrink, how was it possible that raising testosterone levels did not cause the cancers to grow? This was a paradox that needed to be solved if physicians were to accept the possibility that testosterone therapy may not increase the risk of prostate cancer.

The answer turns out to be not all that complicated. All the reports of testosterone causing rapid growth of prostate cancer occurred in men who already had extremely low testosterone levels, due to castration or estrogen treatment. Once we get beyond the near-castrate range, it is hard to find any evidence that changes in T concentrations matter at all to prostate cancer. This is essentially what Drs. Fowler and Whitmore described in their 1981 article when they suggested that near maximal growth of prostate cancer is provided by naturally occurring T concentrations.

The experimental proof of this concept was provided by a landmark article published in 2006 using much more sophisticated means. In this study by Leonard Marks and colleagues, men with low testosterone received injections of testosterone or a placebo every two weeks for a total of six months. At the beginning and end of the study, measurements of testosterone and DHT (the more active form of testosterone within prostate tissue) were obtained from the blood and also from the prostate itself. The results showed that although blood concentrations of testosterone and DHT rose substantially in the T injection group, as expected, the concentration of testosterone and DHT within the prostate itself did not change at all and was similar to the group that received placebo injections. In addition, biochemical markers of prostate cell growth also did not change with T injections.

This study showed in elegant fashion that raising testosterone levels in the blood did not raise testosterone levels within the prostate. It is as if once the prostate has been exposed to enough testosterone, any additional testosterone is treated as excess and does not accumulate in the prostate. In technical terms, we say the prostate has been saturated with regard to testosterone. And it is this saturation that resolves the paradox of testosterone and prostate cancer.

Saturation explains the paradox in this way. At very low levels of T, near the castrate range, prostate growth is very sensitive to changes in T concentration. Thus, severely lowering testosterone will definitely cause prostate cancer to shrink; adding testosterone back will cause the cancer to regrow. However, once we get above the point where the prostate is saturated with testosterone, adding more testosterone will have little, if any, further impact on prostate cancer growth. Experimental studies suggest the concentration at which this saturation occurs is quite low.

In other words, the old analogy I learned in training was false. Testosterone is not like food for a hungry tumor. Instead, a much better analogy is, Testosterone is like water for a thirsty tumor. Once the thirst has been satisfied, prostate tumors have no use for additional testosterone. And the vast majority of men with low testosterone appear to have prostates that are not particularly thirsty.

I no longer fear that giving a man testosterone therapy will make a hidden prostate cancer grow or put him at increased risk of developing prostate cancer down the road. My real concern now is that men with low testosterone are at an increased risk of already having prostate cancer.

When my colleagues and I published our results in 1996 from prostate biopsies in men with low testosterone and PSA of 4.0 ng/mL or less, the 14 percent cancer rate was several times higher than any published series of men with normal PSA. In 2006, Dr. Rhoden and I published a larger study of prostate biopsies performed in 345 men. The cancer rate of 15 percent in this group was very similar to the first study. But whereas the cancer rate in 1996 was much higher than anything published to that date in men with PSA of 4.0 ng/mL or less, in 2006 the perspective had changed due to an important study called the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

In that study, the cancer rate among men with a PSA of 4.0 ng/mL or less was also 15 percent. Because this value is identical to what we had found in our patients with low testosterone, it was suggested that the cancer rate in men with low testosterone is the same as the normal populationneither higher nor lower. However, the average age of men in our study was a decade younger than the men studied in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (fifty-nine versus sixty-nine years). Almost half the men in the other study were seventy years or older, and age is the greatest risk factor we know for prostate cancer. The way I look at these numbers is that men with low testosterone have a cancer rate as high as men with normal T who are a decade older.

More importantly, in our study of 345 men, we found that the degree of testosterone deficiency correlated with the degree of cancer risk. Men whose testosterone levels were in the bottom third of the group were twice as likely to have cancer diagnosed on biopsy as men in the upper third. This finding adds to the concern that low testosterone is a risk factor for prostate cancer.

There is now additional data from around the world associating low testosterone and worrisome features of prostate cancer. For example, low testosterone is associated with more aggressive tumors. In addition, men with low testosterone appear to have a more advanced stage of disease at the time of surgical treatment.

Whereas I originally began to perform prostate biopsies in men with low testosterone because I was worried that treatment might cause a hidden cancer to grow, I now perform biopsies in these men because I am concerned they might have an increased risk of cancer. This risk is approximately one in seven for men with PSA values less than 4 ng/mL.

Because prostate cancer tends to be curable when caught early, I feel Ive done these men a service by finding their cancers before they have an abnormal PSA or DRE. With todays ability to monitor men with prostate cancer, not all of these men will necessarily require treatment. But the ones who have evidence of more aggressive tumors should definitely have an advantage by having their diagnosis made early.

For over sixty-five years, there has been a fear that testosterone therapy will cause new prostate cancers to arise or hidden ones to grow. Although no large-scale studies have yet been performed to provide a definitive verdict on the safety of testosterone therapy, it is quite remarkable to discover that the long-standing fear about testosterone and prostate cancer has little scientific support. The old concepts, taken as gospel, do not stand up to critical examination. I believe the best summary about the risk of prostate cancer from testosterone therapy, based on published evidence at the time this book is written, is as follows:

Low blood levels of testosterone do not protect against prostate cancer and, indeed, may increase the risk.

High blood levels of testosterone do not increase the risk of prostate cancer.

Treatment with testosterone does not increase the risk of prostate cancer, even among men who are already at high risk for it.

In men who do have metastatic prostate cancer and who have been given treatment that drops their blood levels of testosterone to near zero, starting treatment with testosterone (or stopping treatment that has lowered their testosterone to near zero) might increase the risk that residual cancer will again start to grow.

Prostate cancer with infiltration into bladder, lymph nodes, and urethra.

One of the most important and reassuring studies regarding testosterone and prostate cancer was an article published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in 2008, in which the authors of eighteen separate studies from around the world pooled their data regarding the likelihood of developing prostate cancer based on concentrations of various hormones, including testosterone. This enormous study included more than 3,000 men with prostate cancer and more than 6,000 men without prostate cancer, who served as controls in the study. No relationship was found between prostate cancer and any of the hormones studied, including total testosterone, free testosterone, or other minor androgens. In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Carpenter and colleagues from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health suggest scientists finally move beyond the long-believed but unsupported view that high testosterone is a risk for prostate cancer.

More and more physicians are coming around to recognize that testosterone therapy is not a true risk for prostate cancer, but it can take many years to alter established beliefs. Dont be surprised if your own doctor still raises this issue with you if you are considering testosterone therapy. If he objects to treating you for that reason, you should refer him to the article above, or one of the other review articles listed in the References at the back of this book. Even better, have him read this chapter!

Q. Im fifty-three years old and Ive been on testosterone therapy for two years, with good results. However, my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer at age seventy-five. Does this mean I need to stop testosterone?

A. There is a familial form of prostate cancer, but only in families in which prostate cancer occurs at age sixty-five or younger. Even in those families where a family member develops cancer at a young age, this does not necessarily mean that every other male in the family will develop cancer. Men with a family history of prostate cancer should be sure to have a yearly PSA and prostate exam. There is no need to discontinue testosterone treatment.

Q. My physician started me on testosterone, but I never had a prostate biopsy. I am sixty-four years old. Was this a mistake?

A. Because there is no evidence that testosterone treatment increases the risk of prostate cancer, it is fine to begin therapy as long as your PSA and DRE are normal. My own practice is to recommend prostate biopsy in men with low testosterone because our published data indicate there is an increased risk that cancer is already present in men with low testosterone, but this is by no means a standard recommendation yet among physicians.

Q. Why do you perform prostate biopsies on men with low testosterone if you dont feel that testosterone treatment will make a hidden cancer grow?

A. Because so many men with prostate cancer will not die from it, even without treatment, there is a fair amount of controversy over how aggressive to be in making the diagnosis. My perspective is that it is worth knowing the diagnosis, whether or not one chooses to be treated immediately. And because low testosterone seems to represent a small but definite increased risk, I feel that biopsy in men over fifty with low testosterone is worthwhile.

Q. A man in my bowling league was started on testosterone treatment and then developed prostate cancer one year later. Doesnt that show that testosterone is risky for prostate cancer?

A. If the wife of this man had switched to a new type of laundry detergent before the cancer was diagnosed, would we assume the cancer was caused by the detergent? Of course not. But we are predisposed to believe that testosterone therapy causes prostate cancer, so it is easy to hear a story like this and assume that testosterone therapy caused the cancer. Prostate cancer and testosterone therapy are both common in the United States, and both tend to occur in the same age range, so there will always be stories of men developing cancer some time after beginning testosterone therapy. If testosterone really made prostate cancers grow, then we should see high rates of cancer among men who start testosterone therapy. But we dont. Its false logic.

Q. Isnt it true that all men would eventually get prostate cancer if they lived long enough? If so, why does it even matter if testosterone were to increase the risk of something that is inevitable anyway?

A. Men do get prostate cancer at an increasingly high rate as they age. And it is true that most men diagnosed with prostate cancer would never have a moments trouble from it, even if it were left untreated, because most of these cancers grow so slowly that other medical conditions eventually become more troublesome. Yet for those with more aggressive forms of prostate cancer, the danger is very real. The challenge is to identify men at risk, because even high-grade prostate cancer is curable when caught early.

Q. It took more than thirty years for scientists to learn that hormones were dangerous for women and caused breast cancer. Isnt it possible well eventually find out the same is true for testosterone and prostate cancer?

Abraham Morgentaler, MD

A. The fear that hormone therapy is dangerous in women is currently being reevaluated, and it appears to not be as dangerous as was originally proclaimed. More to the point, it is critical to understand that men are not women and that testosterone is not estrogen. Anyone, particularly a scientist, must always allow for the possibility that new information will one day change current views. But after so much research over so many decades, there is little reason to believe that testosterone therapy poses a major risk for prostate cancer. As a medical student once said to me, If testosterone is really so dangerous for prostate cancer, why is it so hard to show it?

Abraham Morgentaler, MD, is an associate clinical professor of urology at Harvard Medical School, and is the founder of Mens Health Boston, a center focusing on sexual and reproductive health for men. He is the author of a number of popular books including The Male Body and The Viagra Myth.

Excerpted with permission from Testosterone for Life: Recharge Your Sex Drive, Muscle Mass, Energy and Overall Health by Abraham Morgentaler, MD, FACS. Published by McGraw-Hill.

If you have any questions on the scientific content of this article, please call a Life Extension Wellness Specialist at 1-800-226-2370.

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Myth about Testosterone Replacement and Prostate Cancer – page 2

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11 Benefits of Testosterone Replacement Therapy – TOT …

TRT is not something that I purposely chose, rather it chose me. I thought it was a fun topic to read about butI didnt expect to take it seriously until at least my mid-30s. Life often has a different way of throwing us curveballs. Thankfully my lifes curveballexposed me to the amazing benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

Due to much online research and stumbling onto the writings of Jay Campbell,I received a male hormone panelblood test and it shockinglyrevealed I had low testosterone. 29 years old and sitting there with the blood levels of a geriatric. What am I going to do?

Looking back, I now know I had symptoms of low Testosterone for a couple years proceeding the test, but I took them for granted. I never even contemplated the possibility of low T in my 20s. Who at that age really does?

Sadly, I believe this affliction affects many more men just like me. Men who are suffering in silence because they either refuse to get checked or even worse, are evaluated by a Physician unaware to even check for Testosterone Deficiency. (TD)

So now at the age of 29, after a ton of research, interviewing multiple Doctors and even more back and forth personal deliberation (likely brought on by my low T), I decided to bite the bullet and choose a physician managedTRT protocol.

Its important I tell everyone reading this, I spent hours pouring throughJays The Definitive TRT MANual(IMO, it is hands down the best book written about this very complex topic). I also spend a couple weeks reading various Excel Male Forumuser experiences on TRT.

All of this information allowed me tofeel informed enough to start down the path of TRT. Ultimately, no amount of reading can prepare you for the real life experienceof supplementalTestosterone coursing thru your body.

After a couple of months of working with my Doctor, here are the 11 most noticeable benefits of Testosterone Replacement Therapy:

I am a firm believer that your mood is the result of your thinking. However, when your hormones are out of whack, you dont realize how much effect it has on your thoughts, as mind and body are truly one.

Before TRT, my moods were lower and subject to change, I remember having slumps, feeling down for days on end and I could never understand why I had no desire to work out.

Now I feel much more on it. Its difficult to describe, but I feel as though my energy is more aligned. I still experience the ups and downs of life, but they are rare and Im overall superpositive. Testosterone just gives you that YEAH, I GOT THIS feeling.

Over time I noticed my interest in sex gradually diminished and I would feel ambiguous toward it. Thinking back on it, it seemspathetic a virile man in his late 20s had a declining desire for SEX. Yikes.

Libido is one of the hallmarks of youth, and when its diminished you definitely notice the effect it has on your energy and vigor.

Libido can be a complex issue and is not necessarily solved by testosterone alone. In my case, TRT improved my libido to a level higher than I had experienced previously.Its pretty cool to see somerecently released studies validating my own experience.

In the year prior to TRT, I became disillusioned with my training in the gym. I struggled tremendously to even put on a small amount of muscle.

I analyzed every aspect of my diet and training, I questioned myself: maybe I wasnt training hard enough? Maybe my diet wasnt that good after all? Im no Mike Mentzer, but I thought my efforts merited a little more than I was getting. I figured because I had been training a few years that I had maxed out my genetic potential and couldnt grow any more.

After undergoing TRT, its clear that mylow T stalled my progress. Now I train with greater intensity and I have an unparalleled sense of urgencyto kick ass during my workout. I have fewer off days and the majority of my workoutsI feel stronger with more stamina.

Testosterone due to its affinity for the bodys androgen receptors allows you to increase lean mass, so you can reasonably expect to gain muscle while on TRT. However, this doesnt happen by virtue of T alone. As the body is quite happy with the way things are, you have to put in the work if you want it to change. This means you need to eat above maintenanceclean carbsand understand what your daily protein requirements are.

So far, Ive gained around 10lbs while on TRT, but none of it came without busting my balls in the gym. While much of it is lean mass, I have no doubt some is water weight due to Testosterones ability to enhanceglycogen storage capacity.All in all, Im pleased with the results.

There is no doubt that lower levels of testosterone lead to hesitancy and doubt. In the past I would second guess myself a lot. These days I feel more assertive and confident in my choices, instead of being paralyzed with indecision.

Thats not to say youre going to turn into a Drill Sergeant overnight, optimal levels of testosterone just give greater clarity to your thinking and allow you to cut through the bullshit.

In the past if I had a heavy training day, particularly legs, I might be sore for several days. I still get muscle soreness (DOMS) after workouts, but its nowhere near what it was previous to using TRT.I also recover much quicker. In fact, I believe one of the unsung positive attributes regarding TRT is the ability to speed healing especially withsoft tissue injuries.

Interventional endocrinology is not an exact science and its constantly evolving. Every case is unique to the individual. In the beginning, you need to get your blood work CHEKDand then maintain ongoing follow up labs at 4-6 weeksto understandhow your body is respondingto treatment.

My Doctor and I carefully observed how I felt and we comparednotes, He also had me experiment with different injection frequencies. I eventually found my sweet-spot and can say I feel better toward the higher end of the optimal range of total testosterone levels(1100-1400). Other men (based on my reading) doperfectly fine at 600-800 total Testosterone ng/dl for example.

You must be patient and give your body time to become hormonally balanced betweentestosterone and estrogen.Every man is biochemically unique and what works for some may not work for others. Its also why working with a progressive physician expert at balancing endocrine systems is crucial.

I read a lot on Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) before I began and talked with a number of guys who were veteran users. I alsosought out a well respected doctor who was supportive of my treatment. Because of these reasons, Ive had minimal side effects.

Of course there are side effects, as with any drug you put in your body, but they can be minimized if not eliminated in many cases.

The only noticeable side effect Ive suffered is some back acne while on TRT. This is due to higher DHT levels, as DHT increases production of oil in the sebaceous glands. This wont happen to everyone and has not been a major issue for me.

As a side note, I have not suffered hair loss. I believe Im not genetically predisposed to hair loss, so this is likely why. Even if I was, it wouldnt stop me from experiencing the benefits ofTRT. For me the choice is simple Id rather lead a quality life full of passion, energy and maximum effort than worry about losing my hair.

Estradiol

Before starting TRT, one of my main concerns were the side-effects of too much estradiol, also known as E2. I think guys are paranoid about this subject in particular, after all the side-effects of high E2 arent so desirable; bloating, water retention and mood swings.

The truth is, if you take a clinical dose of TRT and inject in the right frequency for you, high estradiol is rarelya concern. Whats more, estradiol plays an important role in libido and other bodily processes, so messing with it may have unwanted consequences.

Personally, I feel just fine with my E2 toward the higher end of the range and have no side effects. Anecdotally, some guys take aromatase inhibitors (AIs) when there is no clinicalneed due to their Doctorsbeing overly concerned about E2. Often times, they end up feeling worse for it.

Mentell me they dont want to go on TRT because they dont want to inject for the rest of their lives. I get it. I actually put it off for several weeks because of a similar concern.

But when I finally got my act together, guess what? It wasnt so bad. I learned to backfillsmall needles(that are minimally invasive),and my injection processtakes less than30 seconds from start to finish. In, out, throw away the syringe in a sharps container. DONE.

Id rather have the stability of injections rather than any other delivery system fraught with potential side effects and social inconveniences. Ill go out on a limb and say most men use creams because theyre afraid of injections. Honestly, they dont take much getting used to and theyre very simple once you know how to administer them.

If you are woefully out of shape and have a crappy diet, TRT will not magically transform you into an Adonis.

TRT is however a fantastic adjunct to a healthy lifestyle. This healthy lifestyle MUSTinclude a clean diet, minimal/zero alcohol consumption and regular resistance and cardio vascular training. If you do those things, youll definitely feel like a massively different person.

Final Thoughts

Done the right way, the benefits of Testosterone Replacement Therapy will dramatically enhance your life.

TRT has worked well for me, but only because I didnt go in with a child-like naivety of rely completely on my doctor. In fact, I took responsibility for my treatmentjust as much as my Doctor did. I cant possibly recommend this approach MORE STRONGLYfor any man considering a TRT lifestyle.

The media changes its mind every day as to whether TRT is legal and or effective. And just as many writers are biased andmisinformed.In my opinion, using TRT is a choice to take full control of your personal health.

If you truly want to separate the truth from the bullshit, readJays book.It is a 100% authentic and easy to understandguideon how to experience the maximum benefits of Testosterone Replacement Therapy for lifelong health and happiness.

Link:
11 Benefits of Testosterone Replacement Therapy – TOT …

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Ashburn, VA

As men age, they notice a change in their physical and mental states. This change stems from the body’s lowered testosterone production. Decreased libido,depression and many more side-effects can be caused by low testosterone.

The symptoms of low testosterone are sometimes referred to as Andropause. Andropause can seem like a dead end, a condition with no solution. Due to today’s advanced medical technology, that isn’t the case. Testosterone replacement therapy can provide relief; to get started please call (703) 327-2434 or contact Virginia Center for Health & Wellness online.

While most people associate low testosterone with men in their 60′s, it can occur in men as young as 35. Before deciding if testosterone replacement therapy is what you need, it’s important that you identify the signs of andropause. Andropause can cause:

These signs may appear all at once or one at a time. The onset of low testosterone, referred to as Low-T, can be sudden and shocking. Men’s testosterone levels gradually decline as they age, making most men over 50 an ideal candidate for testosterone replacement therapy.

While it’s most commonly caused by age, Low-T can also stem from:

To determine if you are suffering from Low-T, your doctor can administer a testosterone level test. This usually occurs in the form of a simple blood test. To schedule such a test, please call (703) 327-2434 or contact Virginia Center for Health & Wellness online.

Low testosterone is best treated with testosterone replacement therapy. This treatment is a form of hormone replacement therapy, or HRT. In essence, HRT rejuvenates your system by replenishing your depleted testosterone levels.

Conventional HRT makes use of synthetic hormones that are potentially damaging to your system. This makes bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) the preferred form of testosterone replacement treatment.

BHRT uses testosterone that is chemically and biologically identical to that your body produces naturally. This makes BHRT both safer and more effective than traditional hormone replacement therapy.

Bioidentical testosterone can be delivered in a number of ways, including:

Each of these methods is a viable way to boost your testosterone levels and combat Low-T.

The only way to feel like a young man again is with testosterone replacement therapy, and the only way to receive this BHRT is from an experienced professional. If you’re curious about testosterone hormone replacement therapy, you need to schedule a consultation. Please call (703) 327-2434 or contact Virginia Center for Health & Wellness online.

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Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Ashburn, VA

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Testosterone Replacement Therapy And Bodybuilding

It is physically impossible to use testosterone replacement therapy for bodybuilding purposes, as a shortcut of sortsthe amounts prescribed are simply too low.

Unfortunately, a small number of people seem to think otherwiseconversely, some people abuse testosterone when bodybuilding, using substances like testosterone at extremely high doses to alter their bodies faster than nature intended.

The amount of testosterone these individuals need to push their bodies beyond normal is far, far above the amount that any testosterone therapy provider should give you.

Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) returns your testosterone levels to normalit wont give you an unnatural edge over the competition or magically turn you into a champion bodybuilder.

Remember, this is testosterone replacement therapyits meant to replace testosterone thats missing.

If you already have normal levels of testosterone, testosterone replacement therapy isnt for youits not a shortcut for bodybuilding success.

That being said, if your testosterone levels are abnormal, that is, lower than they should be for your age and sex, then testosterone replacement therapy might be right for you.

If youre wanting to improve your body but youve found that you simply cant gain muscle (or lose fat) like you used to, you might be suffering from low testosterone.

One of the hallmark symptoms of low testosterone is increased adipose (fat) tissue and decreased muscle mass.

If you want to improve your body, to get back into the shape you were in when you were young (or even get into shape for the first time), you wont be able to do it with abnormally low testosterone.

Testosterone replacement therapy optimizes your testosterone levels. It allows your body to build muscle the way it should.

No shortcutsthis is about helping men and women who are suffering from low testosterone find an optimal level of testosterone, about allowing your hard work in the gym to pay off.

The long and short of it is this: you cant use testosterone replacement therapy for bodybuilding its not a magic bullet to help healthy people beat the system.

However, If youre a fitness aficionado whos not seeing expected results, if youre tired of busting your butt at the gym and feeling like youre wasting your time, you might be suffering from low testosterone.

Therefore, testosterone replacement therapy could be just what you need to jumpstart your bodys natural muscle growth mechanisms.

Testosterone replacement therapy is about improving your quality of life, improving it by reducing the symptoms of low testosterone. Its about normalizing your levels so your bodybuilding efforts arent being stifled.

Its about helping you feel like you againits about helping you get back to feeling normal, helping you get back to life.

If youre ready to get your strength, performance, muscle mass, and fat percentage back to where it should be, contact us today about testosterone replacement therapy.

Remember, youre not using testosterone replacement therapy for bodybuilding supplementationwere administering testosterone to get your body back to optimal.

To learn more about how testosterone replacement therapy works, click here.

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Testosterone Replacement Therapy And Bodybuilding

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Is testosterone replacement therapy safe … – Harvard Health

Published: February, 2014

Millions of American men use a prescription testosterone gel, patch, or injection to boost levels of the manly hormone. The ongoing marketing blitz promises that treating “low T” this way can make men feel more alert, energetic, mentally sharp, and sexually functional. However, legitimate safety concerns linger, as explained in the February 2014 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch.

“Because of the marketing, men have been flooded with information about the potential benefit of fixing low testosterone, but not with the potential costs,” says Dr. Carl Pallais, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Men should be much more mindful of the possible long-term complications.”

Some studies have found that men taking testosterone have more cardiovascular problems, like heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from heart disease. Some physicians also have a lingering concern that testosterone therapy could stimulate the growth of prostate cancer cells. Yet the evidence is mixed, with some studies showing a lower cardiac risk with testosterone therapy and no apparent effect on prostate cancer.

In such uncertain times, men should take a cautious approach, Dr. Pallais says.

“I can’t tell you for certain that taking testosterone raises the risk of heart problems and prostate cancer, or that it doesn’t,” Dr. Pallais says. “We need a large study with multiple thousands of men followed for many years to figure it out.”

Until then, here are some tips for taking a cautious approach to testosterone therapy:

Read the full-length article: “Is testosterone therapy safe? Take a breath before you take the plunge”

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Is testosterone replacement therapy safe … – Harvard Health

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Benefits of Testosterone for Women Renew Me Today

Benefits of Testosterone for Women: The Case for Testosterone Replacement in Aging Women

Television, the internet, and magazine ads all target men with products that address the drop in testosterone that occurs with age, but despite being classified as a male hormone, testosterone is also produced by women. While its true that men produce far more testosterone than women do, during the early reproductive years, women have 10 times more testosterone than estrogen within the body, leading experts to believe that its really testosterone loss that results in many of the symptoms women go through in midlife, such as low libido, fatigue, low muscle tone, weight gain, and loss of mental focus.1

Testosterone for women has become a hot button issue as women begin to realize that they too are at risk for deficiencies since testosterone levels drop with age in women as well. Around the world, testosterone therapy is being used to treat the symptoms of testosterone deficiency in both pre- and post-menopausal women as research continues to show that healthy testosterone levels are essential for the physical and mental health of both men and women.

Since the ovaries are responsible for producing both estrogen and testosterone, as the ovaries age, they produce less estrogen and testosterone.2 As women enter pre-menopause, testosterone production is reduced, and once women reach menopause, its common for them to produce less than half the testosterone they did previously. Every woman becomes at risk for testosterone deficiency as she ages, and women who go through a hysterectomy or oophorectomy have an even higher risk of dealing with low testosterone levels.

Women who begin experiencing a testosterone deficiency often notice many of the same symptoms men deal with as they deal with low T levels. Low levels of testosterone in women often lead to an increased risk of osteoporosis, since low T levels can leach away strength from the skeleton.3 Low levels can also lead to an increased risk of gaining weight since testosterone levels have been linked with fat mass in women in studies published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.4

A report published in the Journal of Womens Health even showed that testosterone deficiencies could be a risk factor for the development of heart disease in women.5 Since cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of postmenopausal women, this is an interesting hypothesis that underscores the importance of balanced hormones in women, including testosterone.

Both women and men may experience a wide variety of symptoms with low testosterone, such as fatigue, weight gain, low libido, and mental fogginess. Testosterone therapy has the potential to relieve these symptoms. Low libido is one of the most common complaints among aging women, and studies show that treating women with testosterone can significantly improve their sex drive.6

For women going through menopause, testosterone therapy often provides symptom relief. Studies show that testosterone therapy in menopausal women can relieve the symptoms of menopause, including urinary urgency, incontinence, vaginal dryness, and hot flashes.7 Testosterone therapy may also help protect against cardiovascular events, dilating blood vessels and increasing blood flow, as well as offering a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes by lowering insulin resistance.8

While some buy into the myth that testosterone therapy may increase the risk of breast cancer, studies show that instead of increasing a womans risk for the disease, taking testosterone may actually help prevent breast cancer.9 Other benefits of testosterone women may experience include improve focus and mental clarity, reduced fatigue, reduced anxiety, improved bone density, and increases in lean muscle mass.

Women suffering from testosterone deficiency can benefit from choosing bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT). Since bio-identical hormones have the same molecular structure as the hormones a womans body naturally produces, hormones can be properly used and naturally metabolized and excreted by the body.

When compared to traditional hormone replacement therapy, BHRT offers a much lower risk of side effects. BHRT is tailor made to meet each womans specific needs, ensuring that hormone levels are increased safely to prevent negative side effects.

Women who are aging or who have undergone a hysterectomy or oophorectomy are at risk for declining testosterone levels. Aging women who experience low libido, poor concentration, symptoms of menopause, or other symptoms related to low levels of testosterone can benefit from testosterone therapy.10 Choosing bio-identical hormone replacement therapy can benefit women by reducing the symptoms of menopause, preventing osteoporosis, protecting the heart, increasing lean muscle mass, and improving overall quality of life.11

For more information contact us at http://www.renewmetoday.com to take the hormone health test, and find out where your nearest office is.

References

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Benefits of Testosterone for Women Renew Me Today

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson