NAD IV Therapy: What Is This Trendy New Treatment & Is It Safe? – mindbodygreen.com

First up: Any IV treatment also carries a small risk of bleeding and infection at the site where the needle is placed in the skin or getting too much fluid infused. IV infusions may be a common medical procedure, but they are still a medical procedure.

The second safety concern is where you are getting it, notes functional and integrative medicine practitioner Roxanna Namavar, M.D., board-certified psychiatrist and fellow in the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, who uses it at her own practice."No matter what IV therapy you are getting, you want to make sure your practitioner knows where the ingredient is sourced, and how it is compounded. They should also tailor your infusion treatments to you: It shouldn't feel like you're picking things off a menu. Your practitioner should look at your lab work, symptoms, and goals and create a protocol that is specific to your needs."

This concern comes to light most notably with the large amounts of IV bars that have popped up lately, most without much regulation. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission recently took action against an IV drip bar for making unsupported health claims about their ability to treat serious illnesses such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, or congestive heart failure.

If done under the supervision of a responsible health care practitioner, however, Namavar says there are no significant safety concerns. She notes that some patients may be sensitive to IV NAD+ therapy, specifically, and experience discomfort such as warming of the chest and nausea. Wally Taylor, M.D., a functional medicine physician with Texas Integrative Medicine in Austin, Texas, notes similarly, "One of the things about NAD+ is that you can't infuse it too quickly without it being pretty uncomfortable." He says some of his patients, "say they feel like they're having symptoms of a heart attack, but when we look at their heart monitor, we don't see any evidence of that." He has found that breathing high-concentration oxygen during the infusion can reduce some of these side effects.

"Any time you're giving treatments intravenously, there could be problems of one sort or another," says Taylor. "So it's useful to have the direct oversight of a health care provider who has experience with NAD+." He says complications are more likely to arise in people with a chronic illness, but it's not impossible for healthy people to have a bad reaction.

Cost is another issue. A single IV NAD+ therapy ranges from several hundred dollars to $1,000 or more. You also have to factor in travel time to the clinic and the wait timeinfusions generally take two or more hours, and some people may need infusions several days in a row.

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NAD IV Therapy: What Is This Trendy New Treatment & Is It Safe? - mindbodygreen.com

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