Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»

Category : Healthy Lifestyle

Young People Who Rely Much On Fitness Apps Tend To Experience Paranoia And Anxiety – International Business Times

KEY POINTS

A recent survey showed some young people were using the internet in their pursuit of a fitter or a muscular body.

U.K. researchers recently conducted a survey on the effect of healthy lifestyle technologies, including social media and apps, for young people. In their report called "Digital Health Generation,"they warned about young people's use of fitness trackers in their quest for getting a fitter or nicer body. They said that while the app is possibly motivating, it could also lead to obsessive behavior.

The research, which was co-authored by Professor Emma Rich from the Department for Health at the University of Bath in the U.K., suggested that schools should increase their digital literacy education to include matters of health, BBCreported. Prof. Rich said they found lots of participants using apps to track their diet, sleep, menstrual cycle, and heart rate, but in many cases, what the trackers showed did not correspond with how the bodies of the respondents felt.

Rich expressed concern that people were constantly checking their fitness tracking apps, which she said could lead to the development of obsessive behavior in their attempt to get the most likes or shares from their own peers.

"Many spoke of the need for health and fitness apps to come with warning alerts... advising them on when they might be exercising or dieting excessively,"she said. fitness tracking app Photo: StockSnap/Pixabay

Researchers also noted the use of fitness and health apps could contribute to some young people exercising too much or engaging in dangerous dietary practices. Some respondents recognized the need to limit using the apps, saying such technology should be able to recognize when users needed to stop.

Jack Bardzil, a 19-year-old student from Bath and one of the respondents, said fitness apps and trackers could make people paranoid.

"There are heartbeat monitors and in the future, they might have glucose monitoring... these things can lead to paranoia,"he told researchers. Bardzil also added that the way social media platforms oftentimes promote content based on the users previously-viewed material felt unsettling "as they can keep shoving it down your throat."

Tom Madders, the director of Communications, Campaigns, and Participation at the mental health charity YoungMinds, said that while tracking your fitness is a positive experience, it could also lead to negative mental health consequences when the user is already overzealous in using it.

"For some young people, fitness trackers may exacerbate disordered eating and exercise, and they must be designed in a way that minimizes the risks - for example, by not bombarding people with notifications,"he also stated, according to BBC.

The rest is here:
Young People Who Rely Much On Fitness Apps Tend To Experience Paranoia And Anxiety - International Business Times

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Rob Lowe Shared How He’s Staying Fit and Healthy in His 50s – menshealth.com

Actor Rob Lowe has kept busy during quarantine. In June, the 56-year-old actor released his new podcast, Literally!, where he chats with his famous friends, including Chris Pratt, Conan O'Brien, Magic Johnson and more. He's also embraced the opportunity to get outdoors more frequently.

"I love being outside. Whether it's surfing, hiking, walking, or golfing, I'm usually doing one of those things," he says. "Today is a lifting day, and then I'm going to go to the driving range and will walk 9 holes. That's the idea of heaven for me. I'm really, really, really physically active. I go berserk if I don't get to channel that physical energy. I get depressed, I get lethargic, I get unmotivated. I have to force myself to have proper rest days."

Lowe is especially serious when it comes to tracking his workouts when he's in the gym, and actually keeps a workout diary, he admits. "I write down every workout that I ever do."

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The Parks and Recreation actor wasn't always so fanatical about his fitness routine, however. "The first time I ever had a trainer and the first time I went to a proper gym was for Youngblood, and I hated it," he laughs. "I had to put on weight15 pounds. I was a little stick figure. It was all amino acids and protein shakes with raw eggs. And I'd lift weights every single day."

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

After filming concluded, however, he started to look forward to his sweat sessions. "The irony was that I hated it, but then I came to love it," he says. "I sometimes work with trainers. I can keep myself at 80 percent of my potential on my own, and if I do need to go that extra distance, then I work with trainers to get to that point."

When Lowe is on set and shooting, he said, he works out on his lunch breaks. "For example, when I was shooting The West Wing, every single lunch break I was in the Warner Brothers gym. I would eat prior to our official lunch break so I could hit the gym, power through an intense 35-minute workout which gave me time to cool down and shower and get back to the set," he says.

Lowe learned how to get his workouts done in under an hour, and it's something that's stuck his current training. "Even to this day when have all the time in the world, it's 35-55 minutes for me and I'm good," he says. "I'm not in a there for an hour or an hour and a half." Quarantine, though, has slightly changed up the way that he trains.

"Prior to quarantine I went to a really great stretching class once a week," he says. While those days are gonefor now, at leasthe's managed to keep up his mobility work in his home gym.

"I've been trying to do all the stretching and mobility work. Today I will go into the gym for a 40-minute session and do some warmups with planking and hinges. Then I'll get into some kettle bell swings, deadlifts, squats with raises, pushups, pulldowns, rows, and some lunges," he says. "I may do some leaps out in the yard and finish up with a little bit of abs. I don't break my days up into body partsI do the whole body."

For Lowe, a rest day is usually an active rest day. "A rest day for me is getting on the Peloton to do a low impact 45 minutes or something. It's probably not the healthiest thing in the world that I can't sit still, but if that's my cross to bear, I'll take it."

To recover, he's also a fan of chiropractic adjustments and massage, but Lowe insists that the most important part to staying in shape is his diet. "I swear 75 percent of everything, if not more, is diet. And that only gets to be more true the older I get," he says. "I could train like The Rock and still not get where I want to be if I'm not eating properly."

For Lowe, that means eating the Atkins Diet, a high-protein, low-carb, moderate sugar eating plan that he's done since his mid-30s.

"People talk about keto, and I've done itit's that great. But I feel like eating Atkins is a more manageable form of keto," he says. "If I'm eating right, I'm not just wasting my time in the gym. I've never had a diet/weight issue. Being on Atkins more about training, maintaining and having the kind of energy I want to have to be as active as I am and to live the kind of life I want to live."

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Combined with his sobriety, it's a big part of what's helped him maintain his healthy lifestyle."One of the great benefits of being sober 30 years is that I'm not carrying all those carbs. No one liked going to a Dodger game and having a couple of beers at the game more than me, but alcohol (consumption) is something I think everybody should take a look at," he says, "because that is some sneaky ass carbs and calories right there."

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

This commenting section is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page. You may be able to find more information on their web site.

View post:
Rob Lowe Shared How He's Staying Fit and Healthy in His 50s - menshealth.com

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Doctors working to determine how COVID-19 affects the brain – KTLA

One of the more puzzling aspects of the novel coronavirus is just how many organ systems are impacted through the course of the disease. Weve heard about theheart, lungs and respiratory symptoms, but a growing mystery is its impact on the nervous system.

Areport in Aprilsuggested more than a third of 214 Covid-19 patients studied experienced neurological complications ranging from loss of smell to stroke.

The virus can lead to neurological complications like delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage. In aUniversity College London studypublished earlier this month, 10 out of 43 patients had temporary brain dysfunction and delirium, while 12 had brain inflammation, eight had strokes and eight had nerve damage.

Another paper published last month inThe Lancet Psychiatrylooked at 153 patients in the UK and found even those younger than 60 could have psychosis, depression or strokes.

How this virus damages the brain and nerves still isnt totally clear. But as two physicians dedicated to the study of the nervous system, we wanted to find some answers.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for the last 20 years and has always been amazed at the remarkable ways the brain is protected by the body. A hard shell of bone, a bath of clear fluid and a blood brain barrier, which creates checkpoints before certain molecules are even allowed to enter. It is our most important organ and more impervious than most. And, yet this virus is still able to sneak into the central nervous system.

And Dr. Minali Nigam is a newly minted resident physician and chose to go into neurology, a field that interconnects the mind and body. Seemingly small details like the ability to raise an eyebrow can tell us what part of the nervous system is injured. Theres so much we dont know about the brain, which means tremendous potential for our knowledge to grow.

Among the most common neurological symptoms are loss of smell and taste, which could be the first clues that someone has Covid-19.

Other possible symptoms include headache, dizziness, loss of consciousness, weakness, seizures, paralysis, strokes and more.

We know the virus spreads through particles in the air, so it first enters the body through the nose and mouth. When this happens, its possible the virus then potentially crosses the cribriform plate, the bone at the top of the nose, to reach the olfactory bulb that houses the olfactory nerve and its branches. If the virus damages these nerves, a person can lose their sense of smell. If the virus also directly invades taste buds, it can prevent nerve fibers from transmitting signals to the brain and cause a person to lose their sense of taste.

Of course, thats just one hypothesis, but we knowaccording to one studythat up to 88% of 417 of patients who tested positive for Covid-19 had these types of symptoms. Most of them recovered within two weeks, without any ongoing neurological issues.

Another hypothesis has to do with a protein receptor called angiotensin converting enzyme known as ACE2 which is found in cells all over the body in the lungs, kidneys, blood vessels, muscles, nose and mouth. In the nose and mouth, the virus is thought to bind to ACE2 receptors in sensory nerve cells and block these cells from facilitating smell and taste.

ACE2 also helps maintain blood pressure and protects the heart and brain from damage. Its role is to lower levels of a molecule called angiotensin II. If angiotensin II levels build up, blood vessels constrict and reduce blood flow to organs, potentially damaging them.

Here is the most interesting thing we are starting to learn. Whether it is the body or the brain, most symptoms dont seem to come directly from the virus, but rather, the bodys overzealous immune response to fight the virus.

The story of how such a virus, with so little genetic information, can wreak havoc to our nervous system is really fascinating, said Dr. Majid Fotuhi, medical director ofNeuroGrow Brain Fitness Centerand affiliate staff at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Take strokes, for example.

When the virus binds to ACE2 in blood vessels, it triggers an immune response sometimes referred to as a cytokine storm. Too much inflammation can impair the bodys clotting system and form millions of small clots or several large clots. Together with the higher levels of angiotensin II that constrict blood vessels, clots can block blood flow to the brain and lead to a stroke.

Some strokes are minor and patients may not realize they are having one. As people age, multiple strokes could build up and cause memory loss or poor attention. Other patients who recover from Covid may show symptoms of their silent strokes as depression, anxiety, insomnia, or cognitive decline later in life, according to Fotuhi.

But make no mistake, sometimes these strokes are severe or deadly even among healthy peoplein their 30s and 40s, doctors have found.

Too much inflammation can also break down the protective wall known as the blood-brain barrier and lead to brain swelling, seizures or spread of infection.

Thats how5-year-old Skylar Herbert, daughter of two Detroit first responders, could have developed brain swelling from meningitis. She was the first child from Michigan to die from Covid-19.

Its not clear why she developed meningitis. But we know that the meninges is a protective layer around the brain and spinal cord and is rich in blood vessels and ACE2. In theory, if the virus binds to ACE2 in the meninges, this could lead to damage to the blood vessels and significant inflammation.

Some patients with the virus were also found to have Guillain-Barre Syndrome, a nerve disorder that can lead to paralysis. Here antibodies, formed in response to the virus, react to proteins found on nerves, causing damage.

But its important to remember that everyone responds to the virus differently.

There are people who have a measured response to the virus and their immune system can manage it without overreacting, Fotuhi said.

Healthy people who are asymptomatic are the ones who had just enough immune response to destroy the virus without creating a cytokine storm or blood clots.

Neurological complications arent unique to Covid-19. Viruses like the flu, measles, respiratory syncytial virus and Zika have them, too, as do theother types of coronaviruses,SARS and MERS.

How this happens boils down to two main mechanisms: direct viral invasion of the nervous system or damage from a hyperactive immune system.

Some neurologic manifestations like confusion or weakness may also be nonspecific complications of critical illness that are unrelated to the actual virus.

Neurologic involvement seems to be a prominent feature of this particular coronavirus, said Dr. Felicia Chow, a neuroinfectious disease expert at the University of California, San Francisco.

Or we may be seeing more neurologic complications with Covid simply because there are many more cases of Covid overall compared with prior coronavirus outbreaks.

Like what doctors see with Covid-19 and strokes.

Whats been reported so far isnt really something that we see that commonly with at least certain types of respiratory viruses, she said. But its hard to say with the still limited information that we have. A much deeper dive is needed to understand the true neurologic burden and sequelae of this pandemic.

There arent large studies looking at Covid-related neurological symptoms, so right now doctors are treating these symptoms like they would for patients who dont have the virus.

But small studies with a few hundred people have come out. One consistent feature is that patients with risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity who get Covid are at higher risk for severe outcomes, including neurological complications, than healthy and fit individuals.

Thats why regular exercise, healthy diet, proper sleep and reducing stress are still important during this pandemic. By maintaining an active, healthy lifestyle, patients who end up getting infected can improve their odds of a faster and more favorable recovery, said Fotuhi.

For doctors, patients with Covid may not be sick with the typical viral symptoms youd expect like cough or fever. Some patients who show up in the emergency room have only shown signs of stroke. And brain symptoms could be a patients first and only symptoms. In certain situations, blood thinners and steroids may be as important as anti-viral medications.

Covid can have many different faces, Fotuhi said. Its important for people to appreciate that.

And its something well keep in mind as we take care of patients.

In covering the pandemic as journalists and caring for Covid patients as doctors, weve learned to keep an open mind. What we think today may change tomorrow and thats OK. Its part of the learning process. As our knowledge of the virus continues to grow, were one step closer in persevering through this pandemic together.

Go here to see the original:
Doctors working to determine how COVID-19 affects the brain - KTLA

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

S.H.E. Week 2020 expands programming to celebrate the Strength, Heart and Equality of Women in Frederick County – Yahoo Finance

The Frederick County Chamber of Commerce will host the week of virtual events, August 24-28.

FREDERICK, Md., July 30, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- The Frederick County Chamber of Commerce is thrilled to announce the launch of this year's S.H.E. Week, a week of virtual events celebrating the Strength, Heart and Equality of women in Frederick County.

This year's event, being held August 24-28, also revolves around the concept of resiliency and commemorates the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting women the right to vote.

"All of the things we value, all of the aspects of life we've taken for granted, have been turned upside down or altered," said Chamber President/CEO Rick Weldon. "Many of these changes are so dramatic that each of us has had to adjust and adapt at home, at work and at play. We've never needed to embrace resilience the way 2020 requires, yet women throughout Frederick County have done just that. S.H.E. Week 2020 gives us an opportunity to celebrate resilient women, fill our toolbox with new ideas and strategies, and prepare for the uncertainty that lies ahead."

"Last year we were blown away by the response to our inaugural event. Our committee members have worked tirelessly to exceed expectations. The 2020 line-up is filled with engaging topics, powerful speakers and valuable information that women from all backgrounds can use in their careers and overall life," said Jennifer Gerlock, vice president of marketing and communication at the Chamber. "S.H.E. Week will be celebrating women's equality day with a special program about the 100th Anniversary of Women's Right to Vote."

S.H.E. WEEK EVENTS ARE AS FOLLOWS:

LIVE EVENTS

Monday, August 24 (S)heroes and Stories: Using Your Voice to Change the Narrative and Inspire Others to Action Time: 7:30 a.m. (Virtual Coffee Chat & Welcome from Yumi Hogan, First Lady of Maryland) Time: 8-9:30 a.m. (Workshop)

In this engaging and entertaining presentation, Julie Gaver will demonstrate why storytelling continues to be one of the most powerful forms of communication. Learn how to create your personal narrative in order to better persuade, inspire and educate others. You'll come away with useful tips and strategies to help you not only find your own (s)hero, but better share her with the world!

Instructor: Julie Gaver, Owner | Julie Gaver Discovery

Tuesday, August 25 Life Lessons from Unstoppable Women Time: 5-7 p.m.

With honesty, wit and a little bit of sass, this panel of unstoppable women share their life experiences and the lessons they've learned along the way. They address challenges from climbing the career ladder and finding inner fulfilment, to forging authentic relationships and overcoming life's setbacks. Each of these impressive professionals has a tale to tell and an experience to share. Empowering, engaging and unapologetically impassioned, their incisive observations will make you think, reflect and motivate you to tackle whatever life sends your way! This session will include time for a Q& A afterwards.

Guests: Crystal Maguire | Winsupply of Frederick Dr. Denise Rollins | Whole Heart Grief & Life Resource Center Jessica Underwood | JR Capital Build Dr. Andrea Chapdelaine | Hood College

Moderator: Amber Smith | Frederick Lifestyle Magazine | S.H.E. Week Committee Member

Wednesday, August 26 (Women's Equality Day) Women's Equality Day: Reflecting on the 100th Anniversary of Women's Right to Vote and Discussing the Mountains Left to Climb Time: 4:30-5:30 p.m.

2020 marks the 100-year anniversary of the 19th Amendment which granted women the constitutional right to vote. Trailblazing women have held government positions at the local, state, and national level; however, women still only make up 25% or less of the U.S. Senate and the House, and those numbers are even lower for women of color.

This lively panel will cover the past, present and future of women's role in politics, and also discuss the importance of local participation. Even if you never plan to run for office, everyone will leave this event with ideas for how to get involved, from big to small.

Guests: Dr. Stephanie Slocum-Schaffer | Political Science & Gender Studies Professor at Shepherd University Betty Mayfield | League of Women Voters Frederick Chapter

Story continues

Moderator: Rachael Pashkevich Koontz | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Women in Business Co-Chair

Thursday, August 27 Women of Color: Stories of Resilience Time: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Moderated by April Lee, this panel discussion engages three women, Dr. C. Yvonne Smith, Piper Crawford and Sue Hough, each of whom will share their personal stories and struggles as a woman of color in the business world. Each has their own unique tale of bravery, vulnerability and resilience and that will challenge, educate and inspire you through their words. This session will include time for a Q& A afterwards.

Guests: Dr. C. Yvonne Smith | Wake Integrated Psychological Services Piper Crawford | JKW Beauty Boutique Sue Hough | Octavo Designs | Women in Business Committee Member

Moderator: April Lee | Lee Building Maintenance

Friday, August 28 Next Steps: Develop a PR Roadmap to Expand Your Reach Time: 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Your challenges and setbacks are not mistakes they are part of your story! Through sharing your stories of resilience, you can inspire and motivate others. So how do you get yourself out there? In this talk, Sandy Dubay Sponaugle will provide PR tips to help both individuals and businesses find their message, audience and platformsso they can create an exciting next chapter! This session will include time for a Q& A after the presentation.

Instructor: Sandy Dubay Sponaugle, CEO/Founder | Platinum PR

VIP Happy Hour Wrap Up Time: 4-5:30 p.m.

This exclusive networking celebration event is available only to our VIP ticket holders, sponsors and speakers. We'll wrap up the week with opportunities to mingle as well as discuss key lessons and take-aways from our sessions. (Not to mention play a few games and win prizes!)

PRE-RECORDED EVENTS

Taking the Leap: Steps for Launching Your Own Business Hear from Amanda Haddaway, local business owner and human resources expert, about her entrepreneurial journey and some steps you can take if you're thinking about leaping into building a small business. During the session, you'll learn about:

Instructor: Amanda Haddaway | HR Answerbox

Nourishing Roots for Resiliency

In nature, trees develop deeper and stronger roots from the wind (resistance). Like the trees, the struggles and resistance we experience in life make us stronger and more resilient. We can nourish and support our resiliency by implementing simple techniques and tools that help support healing, growth, sustaining a healthy body and mind. Using a "holistic" approach (mind, body, spirit and heart), Holistic Health Coach Kim Wilson will share tools and tips for getting back to the roots of a healthy lifestyle for improved health and wellbeing while supporting your own beautiful bio-individuality.

Instructor: Kim Wilson | Farm Girl Fuel | S.H.E. Week Committee Member

Power in the Pivot

In this presentation, we'll cover how you can go from exhausted, anxious, and consumed by fear to having a peaceful and thriving life and business by pivoting and taking your powerback. You'll learn how to reclaim four key areas of your life including your voice, your energy, your finances, and your business.

Instructor: Laura Wallace | Worx Graphic Design

In addition to the live and pre-recorded sessions, interviews on various topics will also be offered as part of the programming and delivered digitally.

Options for participation in S.H.E. Week include bundles (VIP and regular access) as well as individual session attendance. VIP and regular access admissions include an exclusive workbook pdf and private Facebook group for further content delivery, discussion and participant interaction. All live sessions will be recorded and delivered to participants via the Facebook group immediately following the presentation.

VIP event registration ranges from $45-65 with regular event access between $35 and $65. Single session registrations are available as well. Sponsorship opportunities for the week exist and can be accessed by contacting Jennifer Gerlock at jgerlock@frederickchamber.org.

Registration is open at frederickchamber.org/she-week

S.H.E. Week 2020 is brought to you by the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce's S.H.E. Week and Women in Business Committees, with support by our title sponsor FCB Bank, a division of ANCB Bank along with Warthern Team of Real Estate Teams, Ellen Keyser Homes, Lawyers Signature Settlements, LLC, AMI Signs, Edgewater Federal Solutions, Inc, Northwestern Mutual, Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation, Peace of Mind Pets MD, BKG Media and Promotions, Girls on the Run Mid and Western Maryland, Neely Coaching and Training, Support Unlimited, Inc., and Fox Mountain Property Inspections.

The Frederick County Chamber of Commerce's Women in Business Committee's mission is to empower and develop women through education, networking, mentoring and partnerships and to promote opportunities for all women throughout Frederick County. Women in Business Committee members develop programs that provide opportunities for women to learn and network as well as share their expertise with each other and to address the unique issues of women in business.

SOURCE Frederick County Chamber of Commerce

View post:
S.H.E. Week 2020 expands programming to celebrate the Strength, Heart and Equality of Women in Frederick County - Yahoo Finance

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

We’re only just beginning to learn how Covid-19 affects the brain – KTVZ

One of the more puzzling aspects of the novel coronavirus is just how many organ systems are impacted through the course of the disease. Weve heard about the heart, lungs and respiratory symptoms, but a growing mystery is its impact on the nervous system.

A report in April suggested more than a third of 214 Covid-19 patients studied experienced neurological complications ranging from loss of smell to stroke.

The virus can lead to neurological complications like delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage. In a University College London study published earlier this month, 10 out of 43 patients had temporary brain dysfunction and delirium, while 12 had brain inflammation, eight had strokes and eight had nerve damage.

Another paper published last month in The Lancet Psychiatry looked at 153 patients in the UK and found even those younger than 60 could have psychosis, depression or strokes.

How this virus damages the brain and nerves still isnt totally clear. But as two physicians dedicated to the study of the nervous system, we wanted to find some answers.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for the last 20 years and has always been amazed at the remarkable ways the brain is protected by the body. A hard shell of bone, a bath of clear fluid and a blood brain barrier, which creates checkpoints before certain molecules are even allowed to enter. It is our most important organ and more impervious than most. And, yet this virus is still able to sneak into the central nervous system.

And Dr. Minali Nigam is a newly minted resident physician and chose to go into neurology, a field that interconnects the mind and body. Seemingly small details like the ability to raise an eyebrow can tell us what part of the nervous system is injured. Theres so much we dont know about the brain, which means tremendous potential for our knowledge to grow.

Among the most common neurological symptoms are loss of smell and taste, which could be the first clues that someone has Covid-19.

Other possible symptoms include headache, dizziness, loss of consciousness, weakness, seizures, paralysis, strokes and more.

We know the virus spreads through particles in the air, so it first enters the body through the nose and mouth. When this happens, its possible the virus then potentially crosses the cribriform plate, the bone at the top of the nose, to reach the olfactory bulb that houses the olfactory nerve and its branches. If the virus damages these nerves, a person can lose their sense of smell. If the virus also directly invades taste buds, it can prevent nerve fibers from transmitting signals to the brain and cause a person to lose their sense of taste.

Of course, thats just one hypothesis, but we know according to one study that up to 88% of 417 of patients who tested positive for Covid-19 had these types of symptoms. Most of them recovered within two weeks, without any ongoing neurological issues.

Another hypothesis has to do with a protein receptor called angiotensin converting enzyme known as ACE2 which is found in cells all over the body in the lungs, kidneys, blood vessels, muscles, nose and mouth. In the nose and mouth, the virus is thought to bind to ACE2 receptors in sensory nerve cells and block these cells from facilitating smell and taste.

ACE2 also helps maintain blood pressure and protects the heart and brain from damage. Its role is to lower levels of a molecule called angiotensin II. If angiotensin II levels build up, blood vessels constrict and reduce blood flow to organs, potentially damaging them.

Here is the most interesting thing we are starting to learn. Whether it is the body or the brain, most symptoms dont seem to come directly from the virus, but rather, the bodys overzealous immune response to fight the virus.

The story of how such a virus, with so little genetic information, can wreak havoc to our nervous system is really fascinating, said Dr. Majid Fotuhi, medical director of NeuroGrow Brain Fitness Center and affiliate staff at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Take strokes, for example.

When the virus binds to ACE2 in blood vessels, it triggers an immune response sometimes referred to as a cytokine storm. Too much inflammation can impair the bodys clotting system and form millions of small clots or several large clots. Together with the higher levels of angiotensin II that constrict blood vessels, clots can block blood flow to the brain and lead to a stroke.

Some strokes are minor and patients may not realize they are having one. As people age, multiple strokes could build up and cause memory loss or poor attention. Other patients who recover from Covid may show symptoms of their silent strokes as depression, anxiety, insomnia, or cognitive decline later in life, according to Fotuhi.

But make no mistake, sometimes these strokes are severe or deadly even among healthy people in their 30s and 40s, doctors have found.

Too much inflammation can also break down the protective wall known as the blood-brain barrier and lead to brain swelling, seizures or spread of infection.

Thats how 5-year-old Skylar Herbert, daughter of two Detroit first responders, could have developed brain swelling from meningitis. She was the first child from Michigan to die from Covid-19.

Its not clear why she developed meningitis. But we know that the meninges is a protective layer around the brain and spinal cord and is rich in blood vessels and ACE2. In theory, if the virus binds to ACE2 in the meninges, this could lead to damage to the blood vessels and significant inflammation.

Some patients with the virus were also found to have Guillain-Barre Syndrome, a nerve disorder that can lead to paralysis. Here antibodies, formed in response to the virus, react to proteins found on nerves, causing damage.

But its important to remember that everyone responds to the virus differently.

There are people who have a measured response to the virus and their immune system can manage it without overreacting, Fotuhi said.

Healthy people who are asymptomatic are the ones who had just enough immune response to destroy the virus without creating a cytokine storm or blood clots.

Neurological complications arent unique to Covid-19. Viruses like the flu, measles, respiratory syncytial virus and Zika have them, too, as do the other types of coronaviruses, SARS and MERS.

How this happens boils down to two main mechanisms: direct viral invasion of the nervous system or damage from a hyperactive immune system.

Some neurologic manifestations like confusion or weakness may also be nonspecific complications of critical illness that are unrelated to the actual virus.

Neurologic involvement seems to be a prominent feature of this particular coronavirus, said Dr. Felicia Chow, a neuroinfectious disease expert at the University of California, San Francisco.

Or we may be seeing more neurologic complications with Covid simply because there are many more cases of Covid overall compared with prior coronavirus outbreaks.

Like what doctors see with Covid-19 and strokes.

Whats been reported so far isnt really something that we see that commonly with at least certain types of respiratory viruses, she said. But its hard to say with the still limited information that we have. A much deeper dive is needed to understand the true neurologic burden and sequelae of this pandemic.

There arent large studies looking at Covid-related neurological symptoms, so right now doctors are treating these symptoms like they would for patients who dont have the virus.

But small studies with a few hundred people have come out. One consistent feature is that patients with risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity who get Covid are at higher risk for severe outcomes, including neurological complications, than healthy and fit individuals.

Thats why regular exercise, healthy diet, proper sleep and reducing stress are still important during this pandemic. By maintaining an active, healthy lifestyle, patients who end up getting infected can improve their odds of a faster and more favorable recovery, said Fotuhi.

For doctors, patients with Covid may not be sick with the typical viral symptoms youd expect like cough or fever. Some patients who show up in the emergency room have only shown signs of stroke. And brain symptoms could be a patients first and only symptoms. In certain situations, blood thinners and steroids may be as important as anti-viral medications.

Covid can have many different faces, Fotuhi said. Its important for people to appreciate that.

And its something well keep in mind as we take care of patients.

In covering the pandemic as journalists and caring for Covid patients as doctors, weve learned to keep an open mind. What we think today may change tomorrow and thats OK. Its part of the learning process. As our knowledge of the virus continues to grow, were one step closer in persevering through this pandemic together.

Read more from the original source:
We're only just beginning to learn how Covid-19 affects the brain - KTVZ

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Listen up! How sound waves could be used to lower cholesterol levels – The Irish News

A ONE-OFF, painless blast of ultrasound may be a new way to lower cholesterol and high blood pressure and cut the risk of heart disease.

A significant number of people have high cholesterol and around one in four has high blood pressure. Both are key risk factors for heart disease.

Currently, treatment involves adopting a healthy lifestyle not smoking, eating a healthy diet, exercising and limiting alcohol and medication such as cholesterol-lowering statins.

But researchers are investigating a new approach that blasts fat around the kidneys with ultrasound. This excess fat known as perirenal fat has been shown to be a key player in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

It is linked to high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and destroying much of that fat significantly lowers cholesterol in the long-term, animal studies have found.

Now, researchers at Nanjing Medical University in China are carrying out a trial to see if blasting this fat with ultrasound will have benefits in humans, too.

A hand-held device is used to fire a beam of highly focused, high-intensity ultrasound at the fatty tissue around the kidneys. The one-off procedure lasts a few minutes. Eighty-four patients with a history of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, who also have significant deposits of perirenal fat, are taking part in a trial where the treatment will be compared to a placebo.

Doctors will check their cholesterol levels and blood pressure readings before and three months after treatment.

Perirenal fat is a form of visceral fat fat stored within the abdominal cavity close to internal organs, including the liver. It is sometimes referred to as active fat, because research has shown that it plays a key role in affecting how hormones work.

For example, high quantities of visceral fat are associated with insulin resistance. This can lead to the onset of diabetes.

Fat around the kidneys is thought to be a unique type of visceral fat, as it has a network of blood vessels and nerves which researchers suggest means it may be especially active.

It secretes compounds called adipokines, some of which cause inflammation that can lead to a narrowing of blood vessels.

Solo dmg media

Read more from the original source:
Listen up! How sound waves could be used to lower cholesterol levels - The Irish News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Sunergetic Reiterates Its Commitment To Providing Premium Products With Herbs And Vitamins That Promote Overall Wellness – Press Release – Digital…

Sunergetic Products provides high-quality, powerful supplements with premium herbs and ingredients to create unique supplements. It has placed within easy reach of consumers the beneficial properties of berberine, olive leaf, apple cider vinegar, and more

WODDBURY, NY / ACCESSWIRE / July 29, 2020 / According to announcements released by Sunergetic Products, the company has reiterated its commitment to combining the goodness of nature with modern science to produce high-quality supplements. In its pursuit of developing effective supplements, Sunergetic continues to research traditionally used herbs that help support wellness and fitness.

The supplements are an excellent addition to a healthy diet and a fitness routine. These are also a perfect addition to the daily routines of those who are pressed for time and cannot always obtain nutrition from natural and whole foods. Customers have come to trust the products offered by Sunergetic, and that's excellent validation because of the glut of supplements in the market, with many touting benefits that sound too good to be true.

The ingredients that Sunergetic uses have stood the test of time and many of their supplements help support women's health, men's health, healthy digestion, cardiovascular support, antioxidant properties, and a healthy immune system. Magnesium, for example, plays a critical role in healthy enzyme function. It also helps support healthy muscles, bones, and heart health. Sunergetic offers a Magnesium Oxide and Citrate Supplement. Curcumin is a powerful antioxidant found in turmeric and is known to help support a healthy lifestyle.

Sunergetic's Turmeric Supplement is USDA organic, made without synthetic ingredients, and is formulated with black pepper for added support. Sunergetic offers Milk Thistle Tablets, which are standardized to 80% silymarin, to help support healthy liver function. These Non-GMO milk thistle tablets by Sunergetic are manufactured with the same commitment to quality as adhered to for all the other products.

For more information, go to https://www.sunergeticproducts.com/

A company official of Sunergetic Products said, "If you are feeling run down, lethargic, heavy, bloated, have sweet cravings or otherwise feel less than your best, you're probably wondering what you can do to feel better. Eating a healthy diet, exercising, and reducing occasional stress are critical in supporting your overall health. Consuming vegetables and fruits high in antioxidants, phytonutrients, polyphenols have also shown many health benefits. Adding certain supplements can help support your wellness goals."

At Sunergetic, they have many supplements to support wellness goals. One of the most popular is Sunergetic's Berberine Supplement. A company official said, "Berberine is a powerful herb that can come from several different plants including goldenseal, barberry, Phellodendron, goldenthread and tree turmeric. Berberine is a plant alkaloid with a distinct yellow color. The berberine alkaloid can be found in various parts of these plants, including the stem, bark, and roots. Berberine has a long history of use in traditional Ayurvedic herbal practices. Berberine may help support healthy blood sugar levels already within the normal range. Berberine also may help support cardiovascular health and overall wellness."

Connect with them via their social media pages:

Sunergetic FacebookSunergetic InstagramSunergetic Twitter

#

Media Contact

Name: JamesCompany: Sunergetic ProductsEmail: hello@sunergeticproducts.comAddress: 217 Woodbury Rd #84, Woodbury, New York 11797Website: https://www.sunergeticproducts.com/

SOURCE:Sunergetic Products

View source version on accesswire.com: https://www.accesswire.com/599582/Sunergetic-Reiterates-Its-Commitment-To-Providing-Premium-Products-With-Herbs-And-Vitamins-That-Promote-Overall-Wellness

See the article here:
Sunergetic Reiterates Its Commitment To Providing Premium Products With Herbs And Vitamins That Promote Overall Wellness - Press Release - Digital...

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

20-year-old hospitalized with COVID-19 urges young people to take it seriously – KSHB

KANSAS CITY, Mo. A 20-year-old Manhattan woman hospitalized with COVID-19 hopes her story will hit home with young people who don't take the virus seriously.

Cecilia Erker first noticed a loss of taste in early July and didn't think too much of it. However, when she woke up the next day, she had all of the classic symptoms.

"I've never been more sick in my life," Erker said. "I felt like I got hit by a bus, I was running a 102 degree fever, I had a cough, I was vomiting."

Erker isolated at home but failed to get better. She took several trips to the ER in Manhattan and had CT scans and chest X-rays. She learned she had developed a secondary infection in her lung.

Doctors told her she needed more intensive care, and she was sent to the University of Kansas Medical Center, where she spent three days in the ICU and five days in isolation in a COVID wing.

She developed a secondary infection and will undergo surgery to have most of her lung removed next week.

Erker said she lived an active and healthy lifestyle before testing positive.

"I never thought I'd be in this position, to be two weeks away from turning 21, and I'm basically losing a lung," Erker said.

Erker described the experience as terrifying, but she hopes it will hit home with those who don't take the virus seriously.

"It's very real; no one's invincible, no one's immune, it doesn't matter if you're young, old, healthy," Erker said.

Erker is one of a growing number of cases in young people across the country. In Missouri and Kansas, those in the 20-30 age groups are showing the highest number of cases currently.

Dr. Dana Hawkinson, medical director of Infection Control and Prevention at the University of Kansas Health System, said gatherings are likely to blame.

"If we can remember to wear our masks and gather in small groups, certainly less than 10 is much safer in smaller groups than larger groups, we can really start to decrease the spread of this disease," Hawkinson said.

Erker hopes others will think of her story when they consider going against that advice.

"I went out to restaurants, hung out with friends, and now I'm paying the price for it, and I regret it. If I could take it back I would," Erker said.

More:
20-year-old hospitalized with COVID-19 urges young people to take it seriously - KSHB

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

L-Nutra and FEAST Announce New Joint Effort to Help Bridge Food and Nutrition Disparities in Under Resourced Communities – PRNewswire

LOS ANGELES, July 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- L-Nutra, a global leader in nutri-technology, and FEAST, a non-profit dedicated to community health and wellness, today announced a new joint effort to address health disparities in underserved Los Angeles communities through a year-long series of wellness programs, food education, and nutrition information that will take place in community settings to address unhealthy eating habits and inequitable food environments in order to create steps toward healthier lives.

"Nutrition is our passion and we believe everyone, regardless of where they live, should have the access to the information and resources to eat better, be healthier and live longer. At L-Nutra, we are working to enhance human healthspan up to 100 years," said Joseph Antoun MD, CEO of L-Nutra. "FEAST is a dedicated organization addressing long-standing nutrition disparities with the infrastructure to make a difference through targeted efforts in these communities. As part of the joint effort, L-Nutra will commit our resources to support FEAST and provide our experts and knowledge to build on the organization's programs, reach and effectiveness."

Food and nutrition disparities are long-standing problems across the U.S. and have worsened during the COVID-19 public health crisis, exacerbating inequalities that factor into systemic health gaps. According to new researchby economists at Northwestern University based on Census Bureau data, nearly four in 10 Black and Hispanic households with children are struggling to feed their families during the coronavirus pandemic.

L-Nutra and FEAST aim to work together to bridge nutrition gaps and support those who are in need, specifically those that depend on food banks and live in food deserts. L-Nutra will supportFEAST's 16-week wellness programs this year in LA that incorporate food education, including nutrition information, recipes and cooking demonstrations, access to fresh whole foods through a weekly grocery scholarship, and support through peer-to-peer sharing circles designed to uncover the underlying causes of current eating habits and create steps forwardtoward better behaviours and healthier lives. As part of this joint effort, L-Nutra will immediately provide direct program support to FEAST's virtual Week of Wellness and annual Fall Fundraising event. FEAST's Week of Wellness, July 27th through 31st, provides daily morning mindful activities, midday fitness activities and early evening healthy recipes, all accessible for free through the organization's Instagram live streams, https://www.instagram.com/feast_for_all/.

FEAST's wellness programs, offered in English and Spanish, have moved to virtual platforms during the pandemic and provide weekly food boxes delivered directly to participants. Delivering essential food items to those that need it most increases food security and decreases their exposure to COVID-19, as participants do not have to leave their homes for their boxes.

"At FEAST, we have made strategic adjustments to ensure the safety of those we serve while maintaining our resolve and commitment to get them the education, resources, and food they and their families need," said Dana Rizer, FEAST executive director. "We are thrilled to have this joint effort with L-Nutra. The nutrition expertise L-Nutra brings, along with their commitment to healthy lifestyle solutions to increase longevity, is a perfect match to help us advance health and wellness in under resourced communities through the power of healthy foods and human connection."

L-Nutra also announced a separate initiative to donate Fast Bar products to hospital staff working throughout underserved L.A. communities, which have been hit hard by COVID-19. This is follow-up to a Fast Bar product donation the company made to several hospitals in L.A., San Diego, Sacramento, New Jersey and New York in April. Fast Bar is a premium nutrition bar that provides nourishment and energy.

"Medical professionals throughout L.A. are working extended hours to treat COVID-19 patients and to save lives. They are our heroes. We hope this donation will help them get through long, demanding days," said Dr. Antoun.

About FEASTEstablished in 2013, FEAST's mission is to promote health and wellness in communities through the power of healthy foods and human connection. FEAST's comprehensive programs combine practical tools like nutrition education and healthy shopping skills with food access, peer-support and community engagement to increase individual wellness so participants can live full, healthy lives. FEAST has impacted the lives of thousands of individuals in Southern California, New York City, and Lincoln, Nebraska. For more information, visit at https://feastforall.org/

About L-NutraL-Nutra is leading the discovery, design,and commercialization of novel,plant-based nutrition programs and therapeutics to enhance human healthspan up to 100 years. L-Nutra translates the science behind ProLon Fasting Mimicking Diet and Nutrition For Longevitywith breakthrough discoveries in cellular-level nutrient signalling pathways to promote healthy aging technologies and to advance the development of therapeutic solutions for age-related diseases. For more information visit http://www.l-nutra.com

SOURCE L-Nutra

http://www.l-nutra.com

Read the original here:
L-Nutra and FEAST Announce New Joint Effort to Help Bridge Food and Nutrition Disparities in Under Resourced Communities - PRNewswire

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Move Over Clean Beauty, Clean Wine Is Here – Forbes

Good Clean Wine by Michelle Feldman and Courtney Dunlop.

Clean beauty has been all the rage, but a new clean favorite is about to hit center stage- clean wine. Although clean wine isnt a novel idea, it hasnt been readily available or accessible to the masses. The easiest way to get ahold of truly clean wine is to have a relationship with an organic winery. Luckily, Michelle Feldman, a holistic esthetician turned sommelier, and Courtney Dunlop, former beauty and health journalist, came together to bring clean wine to everyone with their brand Good Clean Wine.

We both love and drink wine. Weve seen the rise of clean beauty and skincare, and people becoming aware of what they put on their skin and in their bodies. People feel comfortable seeking out clean skincare and farm-fresh, unprocessed food, but when it comes to wine, its very confusing. People arent aware that there are many additives that can be added to wine. There are so many amazing wine producers out there making high quality wine without these additives, and they are using sustainable farming practices, but we saw that there was a huge group of people that would never find these wines because they arent experts. With Good Clean Wine we are able to offer some of this wine to people who otherwise would never experience it, shared Feldman and Dunlop.

Founders of Good Clean Wine, Courtney Dunlop and Michelle Feldman.

According to Feldman, wine can include up to 60 ingredients in addition to grapes to achieve desired colors and tastes and to fix and stabilize wine. Sugars are added to control fermentation and to sweeten wine. Oak flavoring or oak chips can be added to give the wine an oak aroma and taste, without the need for barrels. Even more shocking, often times dyes like megapurple are added to bump up flavor and color, and animal by products like fish bladders and beef gelatin can be used to filter and fine impurities out of wine. Winemakers and experts debate whether these ingredients and processes are harmful or not. Its more about transparency you dont have to list any of these ingredients on the label, but we think the consumer should at least be able to make the choice about whether they care about additives or not. At the end of the day, people should just drink what they like and what makes them feel good, she explained.

While the EU has regulations around what can be added to wine, in the US there arent any set standards in place. Much like the beauty industry there isnt a benchmark or guideline to what defines clean wine. Typically, clean wine is sustainably farmed and made from vineyard to bottle. Dunlop and Feldman chose to use the word clean because customers already have a frame of reference for that term and are familiar with it in regards to skincare and food. Our version of clean means minimal intervention. As little as possible is done to the wine during the entire process from grape to bottle so that the wine tastes amazing and makes you feel great. At the end of the day, the only way to really know if your wine is clean is to know your winemakers and do your research. We created Good Clean Wine for people who arent inclined to do that research, said Dunlop. When we say our wine is clean, we arent saying that other wine is bad or dirty. There are amazing wine producers all over the world making clean wine, and they have been for generations. We are an option for people who arent familiar with the winemaking world and how it works. Our hope is that people try our wine, fall in love, and then it inspires them to be more experimental with wine in general. Weve had clients who tell us that they now feel comfortable looking for Tuscan wines in their local wine shops because of our wine. We just want the intimidation factor to be gone, added Feldman.

Good Clean Wine Rose.

Good Clean Wine comes from Italy made by a small cooperative of winemakers Dunlop and Feldman personally know and have visited several times. We know the winemakers and see the harvest and winemaking process in person. Good Clean Spumante and Spumante Ros comes from the Emilia-Romagna region. Good Clean White, Red, and Ros come from Grosseto, Maremma, Tuscany, the duo shared. Their wine is produced in first-rate soils in sustainable vineyards and wineries with strict biodiverse, organic farming and winemaking practices. Which means everything from the soil, crops, wildlife, livestock and the natural vegetation in the area is balanced and grown together. Wine grown in this way reflects the terroir and tastes amazing. Its made without using synthetic chemicals, fertilizers, organic sprays or sulphur dioxide. As far as sugar additives, Good Clean Wine does not include added or refined sugars, only residual sugar that naturally occurs form the grape. Essentially, Our winemakers do as little to the wine as possible.

What are the benefits to drinking clean wine? Besides the obvious benefit of drinking wine without any additives or toxic chemicals, Dunlop and Feldmans customer have reported fewer headaches, flare-ups, skin reactions, nausea, etc. A Harvard study found that sulfites in wine could be causing headaches for drinkers hence why drinking a clean wine may alleviate that trigger. Taking Good Clean Wine mainstream has had its challenges. I feel like Im reliving 2009 again ( I was still a beauty and health editor) when natural beauty first started getting ramped up, and then it morphed into clean beauty. There was a lot of resistance to those categories from the skincare world. But as you can see, clean beauty is only growing and people love it, said Dunlop.

Besides creating space for clean wine in industry, educating the consumer has been a priority for Good Clean wine. Clean wine is not a new concept. Delicious, affordable clean wine has always been available, but many consumers dont know how to find it. You cant tell from a wine label what is or is not in your wine or what ingredients or processes went into make your wine. To know these things, you have to know your winemaker. We know the winemakers and we know the wine making processes, so we take the work out of it for you, explained Feldman. With wine, people forget that were talking about agriculture. Also, we point out that just because its clean does not mean its healthy. Alcohol is not healthy and should only be a part of a balanced, healthy lifestyle. I compare clean wine to dessert: Sugar is not healthy, but if I am going to eat dessert Id rather it be a piece of homemade cake using all natural ingredients instead of a processed, corn syrup snack, added Dunlop.

Follow this link:
Move Over Clean Beauty, Clean Wine Is Here - Forbes

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson


Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»