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Category : Healthy Living

New UB institute to address health disparities in Buffalo – UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff – University at Buffalo Reporter

By DAVID J. HILL

In collaboration with the community, UB is focusing the expertise and passions of researchers and students from across the university on a major new effort to address one of the most pressing problems facing the city of Buffalo: health disparities among people who live on the citys East Side.

The university today announced the launch of the UB Community Health Equity Research Institute, a center that will conduct research that addresses the root causes of these health disparities, while developing and testing innovative solutions to eliminate health inequities in the region.

The vision of the institute is to ensure that wellness and social well-being become a reality for all people in Buffalo, including people of color residing in underserved neighborhoods and who are more likely to have serious, chronic and often preventable diseases, as well as significantly higher mortality rates.

Faculty researchers and students from 10 UB schools will collaborate within the institute.

The Community Health Equity Research Institute exemplifies UBs longstanding commitment to engage with our local partners to build a healthier, stronger, more prosperous region, President Satish K. Tripathi said. We have founded this institute on principles of social justice that our university community hold dear specifically, the belief that all of our neighbors across all neighborhoods deserve the right to a bright, healthy future.

The new UB institute builds on the work of the community-wide African American Health Equity Task Force formed in 2014 in response to the striking health disparities experienced by African Americans in Buffalo, particularly in the East Side zip codes of 14204, 14206, 14211, 14212 and 14215.

The task force is a coalition that includes UB, Cicatelli Associates Inc., Concerned Clergy of WNY, Erie County Medical Center, Millennium Collaborative Care, NeuWater & Associates, the Population Health Collaborative of WNY and other community groups and community members.

I know in the communities I represent poor health care continues to be a major issue for many of the residents who live there, said Assembly Majority Leader Crystal Peoples-Stokes.

We know that some of the root causes for poor health among many African American communities are lack of access to health care, lack of healthy food options, environmental pollution, poor housing, lack of exercise and unemployment, among others, Peoples-Stokes added.

Thanks to the new UB Community Health Equity Research Institute and the hard work of the African American Health Equity Task Force, were now taking some real action in addressing these issues in our most underserved communities. All residents deserve the chance to lead healthy and happy lives. The UB Community Health Equity Research Institute is a major step toward health equity for all residents.

African Americans living in the citys East Side experience higher rates of poverty and suffer from higher rates of lung cancer and infant mortality in addition to increased risks of hospitalization for heart failure and diabetes compared to the white population, according to the 2017-19 Erie County New York Community Health Assessment by the Erie County Department of Health.

In addition, 3 in 5 African Americans living in Buffalo die prematurely, twice the rate of whites.

Much of this health inequity is caused by social determinants: high unemployment, underdeveloped neighborhoods, absence of grocery stores and poor access to health care, among others.

By uniting UB researchers who possess a broad range of expertise from medicine and public health to law and management the institute aims to negate the effects of decades of federal and local policies that have created racial, residential and educational segregation and disinvestment in communities of color.

This interprofessional community of faculty, students and community partners will perform research that employs a community participatory research model to inform regional health and social policy. This model engages the community by allowing residents to drive the research agenda and participate in the design of the research and the studies conducted.

This is a historical moment, for not only the University at Buffalo but for the community, said George F. Nicholas, pastor of Lincoln Memorial United Methodist Church and convener of the African American Health Equity Task Force.

The issues of health disparities are caused by the social determinants of health, which are rooted in generations of racial oppression beginning with the enslavement of African people and continuing now in uneven distribution of resources and public policy, Nicholas added.

I am encouraged that the university, under the leadership of President Tripathi, is willing to be bold in engaging in problem-solving with the goal of bringing health equity for all in this region. This goal can only be attained with the major contributions by this multidisciplinary institute working in close collaboration with other community partners.

The institute will be comprised of faculty and students from the following UB schools: Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Nursing, Public Health and Health Professions, Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Social Work, Architecture and Planning, Law, Management, the Graduate School of Education and the College of Arts and Sciences. It will also leverage the expertise and resources of UBs Community for Global Health Equity, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute and the Office of Research Advancement.

With the launch of the UB Community Health Equity Research Institute, were further developing a strategic plan to address the health disparities that exist on Buffalos East Side and among African American and poverty-stricken populations, said State Sen. Timothy M. Kennedy.

I commend President Tripathi for dedicating significant resources to this endeavor, and thank the UB educators and students who will help shape this important conversation and identify comprehensive, long-term solutions that will improve wellness and city-wide health outcomes, Kennedy said.

Timothy Murphy, SUNY Distinguished Professor and senior associate dean for clinical and translational research in the Jacobs School, will lead the institute. He is also director of UBs Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

Leadership will also include the following associate directors: Susan Grinslade, clinical professor, School of Nursing; Henry Louis Taylor Jr., professor of urban and regional planning and director of the Center for Urban Studies, School of Architecture and Planning; and Heather Orom, associate professor of community health and health behavior, and associate dean for equity, diversity and inclusion, School of Public Health and Health Professions.

The institute will also name a research administrator and a steering committee that will meet monthly to guide strategic priorities.

Were pioneering some unique and innovative approaches to medical research and health care in Buffalo, Murphy said. With the talent and expertise at UB and other local institutions, we have the opportunity to become a national leader in developing solutions to health inequities.

Three key goals will guide the centers work:

As we continue our work to make the city of Buffalo a place of inclusion and opportunity for all, it is essential that all our residents have access to the health care and health tools necessary to achieve the healthy lifestyle they deserve, Buffalo Mayor Byron W. Brown said.

This new initiative, which will include UB staff and students, as well as numerous nonprofit, neighborhood and church organizations, will help us develop and deliver innovative health solutions to our most underserved residents, especially those who live on Buffalos East Side, Brown added.

Funding for the centers research will come from a variety of sources, with a heavy focus on National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants. The center aligns closely with NIHs funding priorities, which include health disparities research.

The work of the institute will build upon several new and ongoing grant-funded projects underway at UB focused on improving health and access to health care in Buffalo. The projects include:

Launch of the Community Health Equity Research Institute is an example of UBs ongoing efforts to deepen its impact and outreach in the many communities it serves. The institutes objectives are aligned with the strategic goals of the university focused on providing students with transformative, innovative and research-grounded educational experiences; promoting a university-wide culture of equity and inclusion; deepening the universitys engagement with the community; and achieving greater societal impact locally and globally.

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New UB institute to address health disparities in Buffalo - UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff - University at Buffalo Reporter

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Give the Gift of Health – Bangor Daily News

We created aHealthy Holiday Gift Guidewith all of our favorite things raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens kidding! We compiledour favorite wellness gifts, fitness & recovery tools, DIY salt soak, tech items, healthy food and drinks, DIY sugar scrub, and more into this guide, and we hope it inspires you to put a little wellness into your gift-giving this year.

We created this guide because nothing shows you care about someone like giving them the gift of improved health!

Youll find something for almost everyone on your holiday list, and at just about every price point.

Youll find great ideas for:

You might even find a few new must-haves for yourself!

Check it out for yourself right now!

ENJOY!

Wilcox Wellness & Fitness

WANT MORE OF THIS?Be sure to connect with us on Social Media. We post daily on bothFacebookandInstagramfor motivation, inspiration, and helpful tips, tricks, and strategies for healthy living. You can join ourprivate Facebook groupto go even deeper with us orbook a callto see how you can get started training with us in person. We cant wait to connect with you and support you along your journey with healthy living!

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Chloe Wilde takes viewers on a life-changing journey in Crave’s Healthy is Hot – TV, eh?

From a media release:

This new year, TV personality, fitness guru, and nature lover Chloe Wilde (ETALK) takes viewers on a life-changing journey for the mind, body, and soul in the brand-new Crave Original Series HEALTHY IS HOT. From Bell Media Studios, all six episodes are available Friday, Jan. 10, only on Crave.

Developed from Wildes highly successful blog, podcast, and Instagram of the same name, HEALTHY IS HOT is set to inspire new resolutions, endless possibilities, and exciting opportunities for healthier and happier living as viewers settle into 2020.

The series showcases Wildes journey from Vancouver Island, B.C. to Ottawa and Toronto as she tackles fears, indulges in new foods, gives back to charity, and more. Each episode is dedicated to learning and practicing different elements that promote personal growth and make up a healthy lifestyle, while providing an open and supportive discussion about difficult subjects like the importance of mental health and the real effects of climate change. HEALTHY IS HOT is produced by Bell Media Studios. Michelle Crespi is Executive Producer, Bell Media Studios.

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Fit After 50: Living a heart-healthy lifestyle is in your hands – Fairfield Daily Republic

Mark Villalon, M.D., is an interventional cardiologist with NorthBay Healthcare. (Courtesy photo)

Mark Villalon, M.D., Special to the Daily Republic

Cardiovascular disease affects millions of Americans, especially those over the age of 50. The term CVD encompasses a number of conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, heart failure, valve disease or arrhythmias.

If you are one of the lucky ones without CVD, preventing such disease is within your grasp. If you have been diagnosed with a form of CVD, there are still a multitude of ways to minimize your future risk of further health-related issues. Heart health is simply making lifestyle changes for the long term. At the center of heart health is feeling empowered about what features are important.

Diet: Taking a hard look at what you eat (and snack on) on a daily basis is important. Eating meals rich in fruit, vegetables and whole grains and low on refined sugars, processed foods and red meats are keys to great long-term health.

Exercise: While engaging in at least moderate activity for 30 minutes per day, five days a week is ideal, some of us do not have such a luxury with time. Instead, take small steps toward the goal. Take five-minute walks around your job at lunch time. Park in the spot farthest away from the entrance to your job. Being able to adapt to your surroundings is key.

Sleep: The magic number is 7. Not having at least seven hours of sleep at night leads to weight gain, higher blood pressure and ultimately poor heart health. Make sure you have your doctor screen you for a condition called sleep apnea.

Stress: Our world moves quickly and most of us can do little to change the stressors in our lives. We can, however, be mindful of the way we internally respond to stress. Being mindful of our levels of stress is a great first step. Exercise and daily meditation are just two ways that can help relieve the stress levels, which are linked to heart disease.

Numbers: Knowing some basic numbers is important to continue the quest to optimal heart health. These numbers include: weight, blood pressure and cholesterol. While there are several more numbers that your doctor will discuss with you, these are a great start.

Understanding that you have the power to prevent or minimize future risk of CVD is key to a heart-healthy lifestyle. Dont wait for your doctor to discuss the above with you. If you havent already, take charge and take control of the above tips. The power is in your hands.

Mark Villalon, M.D., is an interventional cardiologist with NorthBay Healthcare.

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Fit After 50: Living a heart-healthy lifestyle is in your hands - Fairfield Daily Republic

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Can Green Coffee Really Help You Lose Weight? Find The Answer Here – NDTV News

Weight loss: Green coffee beans contain more chlorogenic acid than roasted coffee beans

Green coffee comes from coffee beans that have not been roasted. Chlorogenic acids are compounds present in coffee beans, which have antioxidant effects and can be beneficial for weight loss. When you roast coffee, its chlorogenic acid content reduces. This is the reason why unroasted coffee or green coffee is considered to be weight loss friendly. However, there is few scientific evidence backing the claim that green coffee is weight loss friendly. When combined with regular exercise and a healthy diet, unroasted coffee beans may help you with effective weight loss as compared to roasted coffee beans.

Green coffee alone will not help you lose weight if you are not following a healthy lifestyle, are smoking or binge drinking. It is only in combination with a healthy lifestyle that green coffee can aid weight loss.

A study published in Indian Journal Of Innovative Research and Development, chlorogenic acid in green coffee is the miracle compound which can help you weight loss. Chlorogenic acid in green coffee can melt unwanted fat in the body, aiding weight loss. What's more is that chlorogenic acid can help in increasing Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR), which can reduce release of glucose from liver into the bloodstream. Instead of glucose, the body begins to burn excess fat, and this ultimately helps you weight loss.

If you are a victim of overeating and are amongst those who cannot practice portion control when eating, then consuming green coffee can be helpful. Drinking green coffee can suppress your appetite and prevent you from overeating.

Green coffee can naturally reduce your appetitePhoto Credit: iStock

Also read:This Is What You Should Start You Day With Instead Of Tea Or Coffee

You can have green coffee with your breakfast or any other time of the day. Drinking it right after your meals can be helpful for blood sugar control and weight loss. Your blood sugars tend to spike on consuming a carb-heavy meals and drinking green coffee can be helpful in preventing this.

You can prepare green coffee like you prepare black coffee. Add cinnamon or honey to add more flavour to your coffee.

Also read:Did You Know Coffee Could Actually Help You Relieve Constipation? 5 Other Super Effective Home Remedies

As mentioned above, green coffee alone will not help you lose weight. Following are other diet tips that can help too:

Proteins are building blocks of the human body and one of the most important macronutrients that you need for weight loss. Eggs, nuts and seeds, leafy greens, lentils, legumes, chicken and soy products are some examples of foods rich in protein.

The first step of digestion begins in your mouth. Chewing food properly can help in improving digestion. Eating food slowly and properly chewing it can make you feel full with comparatively lesser consumption of calories, thus aiding weight loss.

Chew your food properly for achieving sustainable results for weight lossPhoto Credit: iStock

Portion control is the key when it comes to losing weight. Eat foods in smaller plates. Doing this can trick your brain into thinking that you are eating more than you actually are. Otherwise, try to eat slowly and eat only to satiate your hunger not greed.

Also read:Portion Size: Does It Matter?

Fibre is another macronutrient that can make you feel full for longer and also aid digestion. Eating fibrous foods fill you up and may aid reducing appetite. Whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, peas, beans, pulses and legumes are all fibre-rich foods that can help you weight loss.

Celeb nutritionist Rujuta Diwekar advocates the idea of eating food without any distraction like TV, phone, book, newspaper etc. You should eat food while devoting complete focus to food. It will help you be in sync with satiety signals and prevent overeating, thus aiding weight loss.

Weight loss and healthy living are incomplete without exercising. Eating healthy with healthy eating practices can help you lose weight when you exercise regularly and burn more calories. Include both cardio and weight training in your routine for healthy weight loss.

Regular exercise is the key to a healthy weight lossPhoto Credit: iStock

Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

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Can Green Coffee Really Help You Lose Weight? Find The Answer Here - NDTV News

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The Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation (ARPF) announces its contribution in a breakthrough article on Preventing Alzheimer’s through a…

TUCSON, Ariz., Dec. 2, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Mediaplanet's Fighting Alzheimer'scampaign, an editorial dedicated to raising awareness surrounding multiple diseases and conditions, last week published a historical article titled "Why Preventing Alzheimer's Requires a Holistic Approach." ARPF commends Mediaplanet for openly stating that Alzheimer's prevention is a crucial social goal and for highlighting the importance of a holistic approach. In fact, no other approach has been proven to work, be it drugs or vaccines.

The writer interviews ARPF Founding President and Medical Director, Dharma Singh Khalsa, MD, concerning the importance of a "brain-healthy" lifestyle that includes the 4 Pillars of Alzheimer's Prevention: a healthy "diet, stress management, strong physical and mental exercise, and spiritual fitness."

Dr. Dharma says, "Now is the time for everyone to adopt a brain-healthy lifestyle" and "As recent research reveals, the changes in one's brain start decades before any symptoms appear. So it's never too early or too late to head off the development of memory loss."

Besides getting specific with diet by expressing the particular neuroenhancing properties of a plant-based, Mediterranean diet, Dr. Dharma discusses in detail Kirtan Kriya (KK) yoga meditation. KK is a 12-minute mindfulness practice that is both a mental exercise and a stress-management tool. Through extensive research, KK has been shown to improve brain function and reverse memory loss. He explains that this is especially true for women,"which is critical because a woman's risk for Alzheimer's is greater than her risk for developing breast cancer," he said.

Dr. Dharma finally gives much needed hope by confirming that these benefits apply to both those currently living with Alzheimer's and those at a higher risk for developing it, including those with subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment.

As the original organization advocating this holistic preventative model, ARPF is more engaged than ever in educational programs for the public and for healthcare providers.

Alzheimer's disease is a devastating illness that affects nearly 6 million Americans and their families. But better prevention and treatments are on the horizon, with more advocacy for increased funding and research. Help us bring awareness to the realities of managing the disease and the need for resources to find a cure. The campaign was distributed through USA Today on November 27, 2019, and is published online here: [http://bit.ly/FightingAlzheimers]

Web Sites: https://www.futureofpersonalhealth.com/fighting-alzheimers/why-preventing-alzheimers-requires-a-holistic-approach/#

http://www.alzheimersprevention.org

http://www.alzheimersprevention.org/training

http://www.arpf.com

To obtain your own copy of the KK meditation, visit https://arpf.donorshops.com/products/shop

SOURCE Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation

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Support The Gateway Family YMCA this December – Patch.com

As 2019 comes to a close, The Gateway Family YMCA is asking community support to close the fundraising gap for their 2019 Annual Support Campaign. With a goal of raising $27,000 during December to support financial assistance to those in need in the local community, The Gateway Family YMCA is working with donors, members, staff and community partners to raise awareness. Annual Campaign donations help to ensure that everyone has access to vital programs and resources that support youth development, healthy living and social responsibility, as well as emergency housing, child care and adult social day services. Donations can be made online at http://www.tgfymca.org or in any branch in Elizabeth, Rahway or Union.

"Each year we raise the charitable funds needed to continue our vital work in the local communities we serve. We believe everyone deserves the same opportunities to reach their full potential. Motivating people to build a healthy spirit, mind and body is at the core of our mission," stated Krystal R. Canady, CEO, The Gateway Family YMCA, "YMCA donors and volunteers make the difference in the communities we serve. They are our partners in this important work."

The Gateway Family YMCA uses financial gifts to help individuals and families in need participate in programs such as Early Learning Readiness for school readiness, Diabetes Education - chronic disease prevention, employment skills training, teen leadership programs, supportive housing and social services. Donations support the Safety Around Water program to assist local organizations and community children to learn water safety and swim lesson scholarships to assist additional children learn to swim.

Serving the community since 1900, The Gateway Family YMCA helps individuals and families build and maintain healthy habits for spirit, mind and body in their everyday lives, and children discover who they are and what they can achieve under the guidance of caring adults who believe in their potential. With a mission of serving all, the Y brings together people from all backgrounds to provide leadership and learning, volunteerism and housing, and a spirit of service working together to improve the local community.

"The Y is a place for anyone who needs us, but we can't do it without the help of our local donors and volunteers. We rely on community donations to enable us to continue to provide the programs and services necessary for all," stated Melynda A. Mileski, EVP/COO, The Gateway Family YMCA.

The Gateway Family YMCA, is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, health and community service organization of caring staff and volunteers dedicated to strengthening the foundations of community and stands For Youth Development, For Healthy Living and For Social Responsibility. The Gateway Family YMCA impacts the community by providing quality services to people of all ages, races, faith or incomes.

To find out how to get involved and support The Gateway Family YMCA's cause, visit http://www.tgfymca.org or contact the Elizabeth Branch 908-355-9622, Five Points Branch 908-688-9622, Rahway Branch 732-388-0057, Wellness Center Branch 908-349-9622 or WISE Center Branch 908-687-2995.

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Support The Gateway Family YMCA this December - Patch.com

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New Reality TV Show on Healthy Living – THISDAY Newspapers

By Tosin Clegg

A reality television show for promoting healthy living and fight against obesity while reaching out to Nigerians on the benefits of keeping fit is set to hit the Nigerian television airwaves.

The third season of Nigerias first weight loss reality TV show, the Fastest Shedder is aimed at raising awareness against obesity and encouraging plus size people to maintain a healthy lifestyle.The objectives of the reality show, according to the convener, Seyi Olusore, is to create a unique social oriented platform where contestants and viewers can be educated on fitness and healthy living, share their weight loss stories whilst getting support and encouragement.

Olusore, popularly known as Sheddams said that many Nigerians suffer a lot of emotional, social and physical abuse from being obese thus his decision to introduce the fastest shedder to help raise awareness against obesity and body shaming. The fastest shedder aims at engaging people with obesity in an interesting and fun-mixed weight loss activities in a serene, safe environment that will help restore confidence to them.According to him, The programme proves that Nigerians can do anything they set their minds to and that we also have untapped talent who are passionate about their health just waiting to be discovered.The TV series intends to be a life changing adventure with fitness and wellness experts set to ensure that wellness is achieved via recommended diet and exercise routines, he said.Sequel to the success of the last season and the level of awareness generated in African countries, the show will this season, be open to any interested candidate from all countries in Africa.

Auditions are currently ongoing and the show will end in March next year. It would run for two weeks and will be aired across select TV stations. Auditions are organised such a way that each contestant starts with a weigh-in to determine their initial statistics which will serve as a baseline to determine the overall result.The fastest shedder is determined by who has the highest weight loss relative to her initial weight.This season will feature people who feel overweight and would like to shed weight. Judges for this season are Bimbo Ogunboye (Lepacious Bose), Omotunde Adebowale (Lolo 1) Adedamola Ladejobi (Askdamz) Madey among others.

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New Reality TV Show on Healthy Living - THISDAY Newspapers

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Neustatter: Tis the season for insurance scams | Healthy Living – Fredericksburg.com

Its health insurance open season, so I went to a couple of websites to see if we can do better for my wife, Paula, whose Virginia Premier policy has a deductible of $7,100. Her monthly premium next year will be a cool $920. And shes totally healthy and hardly knows what a doctor is. (Except, of course, she lives with one.)

Our phone is in meltdown. I have messages from Debbie, Todd, Jafri, Albert, Krystal, Tiffany, Katy (five times) James, Malique, Lee, Jason, William (twice), Amanda, Anthony ... and on and on. Not to mention the 10 times as many callers who didnt leave a message.

We are not alone, it seems. Aaron Foss, who runs a spam-blocking service in New York, says spamming is at epidemic levels at this time of year, noting they have had a five-fold increase in intercepts since health insurance open season started.

Open season may make you think about black powder and buckshot, but were talking about the frenetic six weeks, starting Nov. 1 and ending Dec. 15, that is the only time most people can sign up for a different health insurance plan. An open season where you and I are the prey.

All these calls and high-pressure sales tactics make me think there must be money to be madea notion corroborated by presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, who has said, The insurance companies last year alone sucked $23 billion in profits out of the health care system.

How Do You Decide?

Being a doctor, Im on the inside, to an extent. Still, I find figuring out the best policy incredibly confusing.

Its gambling, really. Youre pitting the amount of the deductible, co-pay, out-of-pocket maximum and what proportion of doctor visits, hospital admissions, ICU days, ER visits, dental and vision care you need against your monthly premium.

You need a crystal ball to know if youre going to have any major health care needs. It is like deciding which horse to back and how much to wager.

It is now even more complicated, since President Trump issued an executive order in 2017 to promote health care choice and competition. This allowed the sale of so-called skinny or junk policies with lower premiums which dont have to fulfill the requirements of the Affordable Care Act.

Those who Ive talked to who told me they were qualified insurance agents seem to push those types of policies hardand seemed to want me to sign up before I saw the policy.

The advice I have read about these policies is: Beware. They dont have to cover preexisting conditions and can have out-of-pocket maximumsso when youre really sick and really need it, its, Oops, youve exceeded your maximum.

Also, these are undermining the ACA.

The idea of the ACA was that everyone would contribute to the insurance poolthere was that mandate that some Libertarian-types bridled at. But the idea was wealthy people who needed less health care helped supplement those who needed more.

Now, those people are bailing and going for the skinny policies, so ACA premiums are risingat

5 percent per year. And the Trump administration has also cut the tax credits that defray the cost of premiums for ACA policies for low-income householdsto the tune of $4.26 billion over four years.

A TILTED PLAYING FIELD

The idea that unfettered market forces and private enterprise will result in the best system, I think, has been thoroughly disproved by the health insurance marketand by the industry as a whole.

Or maybe Im just looking at it wrong. The industry has done a great job in tilting the playing field to its own advantage. Private enterprise has resulted in the best systemits just best for the industry, not for the patient.

With some exceptions, the industry is not inclined to maneuver to advantage the patient. The only way we can make that happen is through politicians or legislators taking our side.

As I struggle with the nightmare of trying to get my head around the zillion companies, each with a zillion different plans, and the zillion variables, I become even more convinced that local family physician Dr. Jay Brock, with his impassioned jockeying for single-payer health care, is right. It would simplify things, if nothing else.

So I soldier on, bamboozled by the mass of different policies and driven mad because Debbie, Todd, Jafri and their friends just keep calling.

Dr. Patrick Neustatter of Caroline County is the author of Managing Your Doctor: The Smart Patients Guide to Getting Effective Affordable Healthcare.

Dr. Patrick Neustatter of Caroline County is the author of Managing Your Doctor: The Smart Patients Guide to Getting Effective Affordable Healthcare.

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Neustatter: Tis the season for insurance scams | Healthy Living - Fredericksburg.com

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UF Health ready to open Wildlight offices – Nassau County Record

UF Health cut the ribbon Friday on a new medical office building that will provide comprehensive health services and advanced medical technology near Wildlight in Yulee.

The medical office building opens Dec. 6 and includes an urgent care center staffed by UF Health emergency medicine physicians and providers, family medicine, imaging, lab services, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and, beginning in early January, adult and pediatric dentistry. The buildings 40,000 square feet of office and medical space will use a patient-centered model focused on prevention and early diagnosis.

The facility is part of Wildlight, a new master-planned community located at Interstate 95 and A1A. It is the first step in a strategic collaboration with UF Health, the University of Florida and developer Raydient Places + Properties and offers high-quality health care for residents living in Wildlight and the surrounding communities.

This project is a milestone for UF Health in Nassau County, and were proud to be the first provider of outstanding health care services for people living here in Wildlight, said Dr. Leon L. Haley Jr., CEO of UF Health Jacksonville and dean of the UF College of Medicine Jacksonville. Our patients throughout Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia already know how dedicated we are to healthy living, and now we get to bring that same focus to the people living in and around this community.

UF Health is also building a wellness center inside the Wildlight neighborhood that will include UF Health Rehabilitation Wildlight and a YMCA. That facility is expected to open in early fall 2020.

UF Health Rehabilitation Wildlight will offer adult and pediatric rehabilitation services, a partnership with the First Coast YMCA and healthy living classes. Plans include 5,000 square feet ofrehabilitative space to provide one-on-one care. Future expansion can add more than 15,000 square feet for specialty services.

The collaboration bet-ween Raydient Places + Properties, UF Health and the University of Florida began in 2017 when the developer reached out to health care organizations in Northeast Florida to find a dedicated partner with the capability and vision to create a new model for better living. As the chosen medical provider for Wildlight, UF Health and the University of Florida will offer the knowledge, faculty physicians and resources to ensure healthy living is integrated into the fabric of the community.

A little more than two years ago, the University of Florida and UF Health came to us with a bold vision to strategically align forces and break the mold of conventional community development with a new national model for healthier communities at Wildlight, said Chris Corr, president of Raydient Places + Properties. Only the University of Florida and its affiliates have the size, scope and breadth of resources to make this ambitious vision a reality, including the direct provision of the highest quality of health and wellness services across North Jacksonville. Wildlight is appreciative of the opportunity to partner with these leading organizations and create an enduring community that embraces essential values for a higher quality of life, including better healthcare, education systems, recreation, sustainable design and social connectivity.

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UF Health ready to open Wildlight offices - Nassau County Record

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