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Category : Healthy Living

A $40M, 3-story fitness club will open in Middletown – nj.com

The Middletown planning board has just approved a proposal from Life Time, the folks behind six other massive N.J. fitness clubs.

The Monmouth County location will consist of a 120,000-square-foot building with a ground-level beach club and is expected to open in late 2021 on Half Mile Road.

Life Time operates 147 clubs around the country, including locations in Bridgewater, Montvale, Berkeley Heights, Florham Park, Mount Laurel and Princeton. The first location opened in Florham Park in 2008.

Life Time bills itself as a premier healthy lifestyle company that delivers a comprehensive healthy living, healthy aging and healthy entertainment experience that goes well beyond fitness to encompass the entire spectrum of daily life for individuals, couples and families of all ages.

And so, they shun the gym label.

One thing we are not is a gym, as I think youll notice in the images, says Life Time spokesperson Natalie Bushaw. What we hear often from members is were todays modern country club without the golf.

The new location will include:

Three floors with a ground-level outdoor beach club and bistro with leisure and lap pools, a whirlpool, resort-style seating and cafe

4-level parking garage

Dedicated space and studios for exclusive group fitness, cycle, yoga and Pilates programming; one-on-one personal training and small group GTX and Alpha Training

More than 400 pieces of cardiovascular and resistance training equipment

A full-size basketball court

A dedicated Kids Academy, for kids ages three months to 11

LifeCafe, a nutrition-focused, fast-casual restaurant featuring a full menu, Meals to Go and grab-and-go assortments, along with Peets coffee and proprietary nutritional supplements

LifeSpa, a full-service salon and spa for hair, body and nails

Luxurious dressing rooms with whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms and complimentary towels and lockers

The project is expected to total $40 million, and Life Time plans to create 250-plus new full and part-time jobs.

For a peek at what this location will look like, check out these photos from their latest opening in Bridgewater:

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

Photos from the Bridgewater location of Life Time fitness club.

More here:

A $40M, 3-story fitness club will open in Middletown - nj.com

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

On a Mission to Promote Healthy Living Lauren Shares Her Story – Magazine of Santa Clarita

I opened Your CBD Store in Thousand Oaks September 2018. My mission was to create a safe place, raise awareness of mental health and offer a quality product with personalized experience.You see, as a survivor of a mass shooting (Las Vegas 2017) I found myself filled with anxiety, depression and PTSD. Pharmaceuticals gave me side effects and as a mom of three, I didnt like the cloudiness that came with it as well. After I discovered the benefits of what CBD did for me, I felt that it was now my purpose to spread the word with others going through similar emotions.October 2018 was extremely hard, and it marked the one-year anniversary for us. But it wasnt until November that having a store in the community really hit home. I grew up here in SoCal. I went to school in Simi Valley, played travel softball all throughout Santa Clarita and spent many weeknights in Thousand Oaks listening to country music. Our store is located right up the street from Borderline. I grew up attending Borderline very frequently. When tragedy struck our little town it felt very personal. Shortly after this tragic event, we had people from the shooting start trickling into our store to either find relief or find comfort and we were there. We were there to cry with them, hug them, talk with them all while offering a safe place and quality product. And with the devastation from the Woolsey fire to top it off, our community couldnt seem to catch their breath. I remember a customer calling to purchase a product that she had bought a few days prior and lost it because her home burned down. We mailed her a new one, no charge. We donated many bottles of Pet CBD products because even they were going through panic. And once again, tragedy has struck our community. This time, in Saugus.As one of our employees is a parent of a Saugus student, we are especially effected by this as well. Having this as her community we grieve with everyone and our hearts are broken for the loss these other parents have hadloss of their trust that their children are safe at school, and loss of an innocence of their children that witnessed such a horrific event, and the ultimate horror of the loss of a child. Our doors are open and our arms are open to embrace and support our community as best we can.We are not just Your CBD Store, we are here for our community. To bring light in the darkness and hope during despair. Weve been there, and we understand. We are community strong and are so humbled, thankful and blessed to be serving Santa Clarita, Thousand Oaks and Ventura as your trusted CBD store.

Read this article:

On a Mission to Promote Healthy Living Lauren Shares Her Story - Magazine of Santa Clarita

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Edmonds Senior Center events and activities for December – My Edmonds News

Holiday Bazaar

Saturday, Dec. 14

10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Edmonds Church of God gym, 8224 220thSt. S.W., Edmonds

Free admission. Over 35 vendor tables.

Bring your holiday shopping list and plan to check off those gift items! We will have vendors offering handmade goods, jewelry, home decor, clothing, kitchen items and more. Bake sale goods will also be available for purchase. All funds raised by this event go to support Edmonds Senior Center programs and services. Bake sale donations are needed. Contact Michelle Burke at 425- 774-5555 ext.108 if you would like to help.

Christmas Lunch

Thursday, Dec. 19

11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Holy Trinity Church, 657 Daley St., Edmonds

$3 suggested donation for 60-plus; all others pay $7.50

Reservations required; sign up by calling the Admin Office at 425-774-5555 ext. 104

Enjoy a special Christmas lunch that includes tossed salad, baked ham, sweet potatoes, vegetable medley, dinner roll, and holiday dessert.

Take a tripand leave the driving to the senior center

Make new friends, see new places and experience new things, and dont worry about parking or traffic. The senior center provides transportation and ticket/admission is included with the cost. Sign up over the phone with a credit card by calling the Admin Office at 425-774-5555 ext. 104. Become a member and save when you sign up for these upcoming trips:

Monday, Dec. 2: Senior Holiday Party at the Seattle Sheraton. Cost is $12 member/$15 non-member

Thursday, Dec. 5: The New Burke Museum. Cost is $15M$20NM.

Saturday, Dec. 7: STOMP at the Moore Theatre. Cost is $100M$125NM.

Tuesday, Dec. 10: Enchant at T-Mobile Park. Cost is $44M/$55NM.

Friday, Dec. 13: Reindeer Festival at Swansons Nursery. Cost is $15M/$20NM.

For more detailed information about these trips, check out the newsletter at edmondswaterfrontcenter.org

Health and Personal Care

Bastyr Center for Natural Health Medicine Clinic

Wednesdays (Dec. 4, 11, 18)

9 a.m.-noon, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

Mountlake Terrace Community Senior Center, 23000 Lakeview Dr., Mountlake Terrace

Cost: $15/visit; sign up by calling the Admin Office at 425-774-5555 ext. 104

Care provided and supervised by Dr. Laurie Cullen, licensed Naturopathic Physician

Edmonds Senior Center has joined Bastyr Universitys community medicine network and is offering the naturopathic Team Care approach in your community. Patients see a licensed naturopathic physician on the faculty of Bastyr University and advanced level students. Naturopathic medicine is effective in preventing and treating chronic and degenerative diseases. Common treated conditions include:

-Fatigue

-Depression

-Colds and flus

-Menopausal symptoms

-Stress-related conditions

-Allergies and asthma

-Cardiovascular disease

-Ulcers

-Digestive problems

-HIV/AIDS

Naturopathic medicine is a form of primary care medicine, which emphasizes prevention and wellness. Underlying causes of illness are investigated as means to promote patients wellness. Therapies and treatment plans are designed to fit the individual needs of patients, focusing on the whole person including the physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects of health. The Team will blend centuries old knowledge of natural treatments with current research in health and natural medicine. Practitioners can work with patients medical doctors and help patients become partners in their own health care.

EDMONDS Senior Center Foot Care Clinic

1st & 2nd Tuesday (Dec. 3, 10)

8 a.m.-noon

My Sisters Place, 8304 212th St. S.W., Edmonds

Cost: $20/visit, please sign up by calling the Admin Office at 425-774-5555 ext. 104

About the Foot Care Clinic:

This is an all-inclusive, full-service foot care clinic. Routine nail and foot care is provided which includes reduction of nail length and thickness, corn and callus reduction, removal of ingrown nail portion when indicated, and a gentle moisturizing massage of the lower extremities.

All foot care services are provided by experienced Registered Nurses (volunteers/pro bono), who are podiatrist-trained foot care nurse specialists and members of the American Foot Care Nurses Association (AFCNA).

Those with all levels of health issues and foot care are welcome, all stages of basic or high-risk foot care, diabetic, circulatory impairment, neuropathy, anti-coagulant medications, arthritis, gout, bunions, calluses, ingrown toenails, fungal conditions, misshapen, discolored or overgrown nails.

It is the goal of this clinic to help each of our clients reach a level of comfort and safety through regular, ongoing foot care and education so they may maximize their mobility, independence and health.

Healthy Living Workshops

Your Life Your Wishes Advance Directives

Wednesday, Dec. 11

9:30 a.m.-noon

Edmonds Library (2nd Floor Plaza Room), 650 Main St., Edmonds

Cost: Free. Sign up by calling the Admin Office at 425-774-5555 ext.104

Facilitators: Michelle Reitan, MSW, Sue Shearer, RN, BSN, and Angel Malidore of the Edmonds Senior Center

While most Americans say they would prefer to live through the end of their lives at home, surrounded byfriends and family, the reality is the exact opposite. This workshop is designed to educate people and stimulate ongoing conversations about health care decisions at the end of life. Presenters will help participants explore these questions:

1) Who will be your voice if you are unable to speak?

2) What life-sustaining treatments do you want?

3) What values shape your choices for treatment?

4) What documents make your choices known to others?

5) What options & alternative choices are there for burial?

This is a free community class about how to live well at the end of life by making choices now on health care options. Each participant will receive helpful handouts that they can take home to discuss and share with loved ones and physicians.

Follow this link:

Edmonds Senior Center events and activities for December - My Edmonds News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Community Calendar: Meetings and events in Council Bluffs and southwest Iowa – The Daily Nonpareil

SUNDAY

Al-Anon Family Group 10 a.m., The 500 Club, 410 S. 16th St.

Southwest lowa Narcotics Anonymous 11 a.m., Spiritual Breakfast Meeting, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave.; 6:45 p.m., New Way Group, Broadway United Methodist Church, east door, Room 210, 11 S. First St.; 8:30 p.m., Rebellions, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave.

Gamblers 12-Step Program 2:30 p.m., 12-Step House, 7306 Grant St., Omaha. For 24-hour hotline, call 402-978-7899.

Overeaters Anonymous 3 p.m., 309 Elm St., Atlantic. Rear door, wheelchair accessible. Contact Karen W. at 712-774-5620; 4 p.m., St. Matthews Church, 60th and Walnut Streets, Omaha. Call Kathleen at 402-556-7877.

Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 104 Bingo 6 p.m., North 16th Street and Avenue F. Public welcome.

Carter Lake Volunteer Fire Department Monthly Pancake Breakfast 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost is $6 for adults; $5 for seniors; and $5 for children ages 6 to 12. Seconds cost $3. Delivery available; call 712-347-5900. All proceeds benefit the fire department.

White Shrine of Jerusalem Pancake and French Toast Breakfast 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Masonic Temple, 130 S. Sixth St. Call 712-322-0539.

MONDAY

Hometowner Chorus 9:45 to 11:30 a.m., Broadway United Methodist Church, 11 S. First St., choir room. For retired singers. All types of vocal music and all voice parts. For information, call 712-328-2125.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 9661 Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 100 Locust St., Carter Lake. Daily specials and full menu.

Monday Noon Alcoholics Anonymous Noon, The 500 Club, 410 S. 16th St. For details, call 712-328-9979.

Southwest Iowa Narcotics Anonymous Noon, Let it Be, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave., Council Bluffs; 6 p.m., Straight Friends, Presbyterian Church, Third Avenue, Villisca; 8 p.m., Never Alone, St. Michaels Parsonage, 2005 College Drive, south door, Harlan; 8:30 p.m., Rebellions, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave.

Downtown Kiwanis Noon to 1 p.m., Hy-Vee, 1745 Madison Ave., conference room. For information, call Mike at 712-322-0637.

Overeaters Anonymous Noon, Broadway Christian Church, 2658 Ave. A, enter at the main entrance, call Peggy at 712-323-2446; 7 p.m., St. Andrews Methodist Church, 15050 Maple St., Omaha, use southeast entrance marked sanctuary, basement, Room 4. Accessible.

Coping-Dual Recovery Anonymous 6 to 7 p.m., CHI Health Peer Connection, 622 S. Fourth St.

Water Exercise Program 7 to 8 p.m., Lewis Central Pool.

Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 104 Bingo 7 p.m., North 16th Street and Avenue F. Public welcome.

Westend Optimist Club 7 p.m., Peace Church of the Brethren, 2605 Ave. E.

Overcomers in Christ 7 p.m. (for women), First Assembly of God, 3320 Harry Langdon Blvd., call 712-323-7721; 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. (for men and women), Church of Freedom, 701 S. Fourth St., call 712-325-6939. Christ-centered support group open to those struggling with any addiction. Child care provided.

Lodge No. 259 Open Meeting 7:30 p.m., Masonic Temple, 130 S. Sixth St.

I Want to Work the Steps 2658 Ave. A., Broadway Christian Church, 7:30 p.m.

Gamblers 12-Step Program 7:45 p.m., Bellevue Library, 1003 Lincoln Road, Bellevue, Nebraska; 8 p.m., 12-Step House, 7306 Grant St., Omaha. For 24-hour hotline, call 402-978-7899.

Monday Nite Alcoholics Anonymous Family Group 8:30 p.m., The 500 Club, 410 S. 16th St., downstairs. For anyone affected by another persons problems with alcohol. Non-smoking.

Monday Night Al-Anon Building Blocks 6 p.m., CHI Health Building, 622 S. Fourth St.

Alcoholics Anonymous 7 p.m., First Christian Church, 20794 Highway 92.

TUESDAY

Financial Education and Empowerment 10 to 11:30 a.m., Catholic Charities, 1215 N. Broadway. Free classes for those who identify as a victim/survivor of domestic or sexual violence. New participants will need to schedule an intake. Call 712-256-2059 ext. 103 for more information.

Overeaters Anonymous 6 to 7 p.m., Broadway Christian Church, 2658 Ave. A. Call Janie at 712-328-8482.

Overeaters Anonymous 7 p.m., Unity Church, 3424 N. 90th St., Omaha. Call Marcy at 402-571-6843.

Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 104 Bingo 7 p.m., North 16th Street and Avenue F. Public welcome.

Alcoholics Anonymous 8:30 p.m., 410 S. 16th St.

PTSD Support Group for Veterans 5 to 7 p.m., Kanesville Honor Guard Building, 3000 Ave. B. A support group for veterans, law enforcement, firefighters, EMTs, city workers and first responders.

Board Game Night for Adults 6 to 9 p.m., Council Bluffs Public Library. The public is invited to come play new and classic board and card games at the Council Bluffs Public Library. Bring your own or stop in to join a game. This group meets the first and third Tuesday each month and is free and open to the public.

Disabled American Veterans 6:30 p.m., American Legion Post No. 2, 716 S. Fourth St.

Newtown-Avoca Historical Society in Avoca 7 p.m., Historical Museum.

Council Bluffs Lions Club Meeting Noon, Madison Avenue Hy-Vee.

WEDNESDAY

Rent Wise 10 to 11:30 a.m., Catholic Charities, 1215 N. Broadway. Free classes for those who identify as a victim/survivor of domestic or sexual violence. New participants will need to schedule an intake. Call 712-256-2059 ext. 103 for more information.

Wednesday Night Dance 7 to 9:30 p.m., YMCA Healthy Living Center, 714 S. Main St. All dances are subject to change. In case of inclement weather, Wednesday Night Dances are canceled if Council Bluffs Schools are closed. Cost is $6 per person for members; $12 per person for non-members.

Breastfeeding Support Group 9:30 a.m., CHI Health Mercy Hospital Lactation Clinic in Mercy 2 Professional Center, Room 206. Call 712-328-5252.

Lewis & Clark Study Group 9 to 11 a.m., 2 Huron Circle, Salem United Methodist Manawa Center. Find out what happened to the explorers.

Carter Lake VFW No. 9661 Hamburger Night 5 to 7:30 p.m., 100 Locust St., Carter Lake. 712-347-6969.

Greater Communicators Toastmasters Club 6 to 7 p.m., Firehouse No. 5, 3405 11th St., Council Bluffs. Meetings open to the public. Contact Floy 712-326-9332.

Water Exercise Program 7 to 8 p.m., Lewis Central Pool.

Carter Lake Optimist Club 7 p.m., Carter Lake Senior Center, 626 Locust St.

Gamblers 12-Step Program 8 p.m., 12-Step House, 7306 Grant St., Omaha. For 24-hour hotline, call 402-978-7899.

Wednesday Night Live Al-Anon 6 p.m., CHI Health Building, 622 S. Fourth St.

Pre-read Book Sale 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mercy Hospital, 800 Mercy Drive, in the lobby. Proceeds go to activities hospital-wide.

Rotary Centennial Club 7 a.m., Madison Avenue Hy-Vee by Mall of the Bluffs.

This Wonderful Life 7:30 p.m., The Arts Center at Iowa Western Community College, 2700 College Road, Council Bluffs. This Wonderful Life is a one-man play, acted by Jeremy Kendall. Based on the iconic 1946 holiday favorite film, Its a Wonderful Life, the production brings to life over 32 familiar people in an amazing display of physical and verbal virtuosity. For more information and ticket prices, go online to artscenter.iwcc.edu.

THURSDAY

Work in Progress 10 to 11:30 a.m., Catholic Charities, 1215 N. Broadway. Free classes for those who identify as a victim/survivor of domestic or sexual violence. New participants will need to schedule an intake. Call 712-256-2059 ext. 103 for more information.

Journey Beyond Abuse 6:30 to 8 p.m., Catholic Charities, 1215 N. Broadway. Free classes for those who identify as a victim/survivor of domestic or sexual violence. New participants will need to schedule an intake. Call 712-256-2059 ext. 103 for more information.

Optimist Club of Council Bluffs 7 a.m., Madison Avenue Hy-Vee.

Al-Anon Family Group 10 a.m., The 500 Club, 410 S. 16th St.

Council Bluffs Rotary Noon, YMCA Healthy Living Center, 714 S. Main St.

Council Bluffs MAD DADS 7 p.m. Call 712-328-0302.

Gamblers 12-Step Program 7 p.m., Pacific Hills Lutheran Church, 90th and Pacific Streets, Omaha. For 24-hour hotline, call 402-978-7899.

All Acoustic Music Jam 1 to 4 p.m., Western Historic Trails Center.

White Elephant Bingo 12:30 p.m., YMCA Healthy Living Center.

Teen Gaming 3:30 to 7:30 p.m., Council Bluffs Public Librarys Teen Central. Mix of board and video games for students in sixth through 12th grade. Call 712-323-7553.

The Compassionate Friends 7 p.m., New Cassel Retirement Center, 900 N. 90th St., auditorium, second level, Omaha. A nonprofit, self-help support organization that offers friendship, understanding and hope to bereaved parents, grandparents and siblings. No religious affiliation. No membership dues or fees. Find more at tcfomaha.org. Call Shirley at 712-352- 2244.

Blood Pressure Checks Available at Neola Area Community Center.

This Wonderful Life 7:30 p.m., The Arts Center at Iowa Western Community College, 2700 College Road, Council Bluffs. This Wonderful Life is a one-man play, acted by Jeremy Kendall. Based on the iconic 1946 holiday favorite film, Its a Wonderful Life, the production brings to life over 32 familiar people in an amazing display of physical and verbal virtuosity. For more information and ticket prices, go online to artscenter.iwcc.edu.

Taste of Clarinda 4 to 6:30 p.m., downtown square, 115 E. Main St., Clarinda. Sample favorite holiday recipes and collect recipe cards for your home collection as you stroll and shop the Clarinda businesses.

FRIDAY

Seeking Safety 10 to 11:30 a.m., Catholic Charities, 1215 N. Broadway. Financial Education and Empowerment also offered from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Free classes for those who identify as a victim/survivor of domestic or sexual violence. New participants will need to schedule an intake. Call 712-256-2059 ext. 103 for more information.

Seeking Safety 10 a.m. to noon, Catholic Charities Office at Zion Recovery Services, 1500 E. 10th St., Atlantic. Financial Education and Empowerment also offered from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. Free classes for those who identify as a victim/survivor of domestic or sexual violence. New participants will need to schedule an intake. Call 712-256-2059 ext. 103 for more information.

Elks Lodge TGIF Dinner 6 to 8 p.m., 380 McKenzie Ave. Call 712-323-2589 or find Elks Lodge 531 Council Bluffs on Facebook for weekly menu.

Southwest lowa Narcotics Anonymous Noon, Let It Be, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave.; 6:30 p.m., Just for Today, Faith Community Church, 2701 N. Eighth St., Red Oak; 7 p.m., Clean & Free Group, first floor McDermott building, 800 Mercy Drive; 8 p.m., Straight and Grateful, 309 Elm St., Atlantic; 8:30 p.m., Discovery Group Church of Christ, 714 Benson St., Omaha; 8:30 p.m., Rebellions, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave.

Pickin and Grinnin Country Music Jam 6:30 to 9 p.m., Emma Jeans Restaurant, 2117 Antique City Drive, Walnut. Musicians and music lovers invited to a weekly jam session. Call Emma Jeans at 712-784-2500.

UMBA Hall Skating Every Friday night at UMBA Hall in Underwood except holiday weekends or if Underwood Schools are cancelled due to weather. Fourth grade and younger may skate from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Fifth grade and older skate from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Admission is $4. No outside skates are allowed. The party room may be reserved for birthday celebration for $30. Private skating parties are available for two hours of skating for $300. Call 712-566-2222 to reserve a time.

Family Night at the Museum 5:30 to 8 p.m., Union Pacific Railroad Museum, 200 Pearl St. Create, learn and play at Union Pacific Museum free Family Nights the first Friday of every month from 5:30-8:00 p.m. Every month features a different theme and new partners in this mini carnival-like family event. For more information please visit the website http://www.uprrmuseum.org or call 712-329-8307.

Winter Wonderland Night Hike 6 p.m., Hitchcock Nature Center, 27792 Ski Hill Loop, Honey Creek. A guided night hike to experience a whole new side of nature at Hitchcock Nature Center. Hit the trails with a naturalist and see what winter holds during this interpretive hike then join in for cookies and cocoa to warm up after the adventure. All ages are welcome to attend this event. While the hike will not be strenuous. it will involve walking on uneven terrain in the dark; please wear appropriate closed-toe shoes. Strollers are not permitted. The cost for this event is $5 per person and includes admission to the park, all programming, and refreshments. Space in this hike is very limited; pre-registration is required to attend. Please go online to pottcoconservation.com for details and to register.

SATURDAY

Overeaters Anonymous 8:30 a.m., Douglas County Health Center, town hall meeting room, first floor, 42nd and Woolworth Streets, Omaha. Call Tracy at 402-551-9711. 10:30 a.m., Unity Church, 3424 N. 90th St., Omaha. Wheelchair accessible and child care provided. Call Dala at 402-210-3755.

Southwest Iowa Narcotics Anonymous 5 p.m., Saturday Serenity, St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 812 Farnum St., Harlan; 6 p.m., On the Right Track, 515 E. Broadway; 8 p.m., Living Clean, 303 Walnut St., Shenandoah; 8:30 p.m., Rebellions, New Litehouse, 200 16th Ave.

Gamblers 12-Step Program 7 p.m., 354 N. 76th St., Omaha. For 24-hour hotline, call 402-978-7899.

Electric Music Jam Noon to 4 p.m., Western Historic Trails Center.

Treynor Optimist Club 8 a.m., Treynor Community Center.

Underwood Optimist Club 7:30 a.m., UMBA Hall.

Christmas at the Orchard 4 to 9 p.m., Ditmars Orchard & Vineyard, 19475 225th St., Council Bluffs. Live music from Jerome Brich from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Take your own free photo with Santa and Mrs. Claus from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Warm up inside with hot apple cider, mulled wine and cider, chili, or soup. For more information, go online to facebook.com and search Christmas at the Orchard.

Santa House 10 to 11:30 a.m., downtown square, 115 E. Main St., Clarinda. Sponsored by the Clarinda Lions Club.

Exira Festival of Lights Main Street, Exira. One of the largest Christmas trees in Southwest Iowa. Soup supper, cookie walk, children activities and Santa.

Winter Craft Fair & Goodie Walk 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., United Methodist Church of Logan, 302 E. Eighth St., Logan. Crafts by local and out of town crafters and vendors. Goodie Walk starts at 9 a.m. (Sponsored by Sunday school youth to raise money for camp.)

Continued here:

Community Calendar: Meetings and events in Council Bluffs and southwest Iowa - The Daily Nonpareil

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Healthy Living: Cutting calories, not traditions – Q13 News Seattle

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SEATTLE -- You know youre going to eat it! What? All of it! The pies, mashed potatoes, and green bean casserole. Is it possible to health these items up just a bit without changing the flavor that you love? YES!

The average person will consume 4500 calories on Turkey day. We are not attempting to talk you out of it!

However, with a few tweaks, Nutritionist Deborah, you could cut down on some of the bad fats and sugar and still enjoy all of the typical Thanksgiving goodies.

RECIPES:

CRANBERRY SAUCE Healthy hack: MONK FRUIT TO CUT THE SUGAR GRAMS

1/2 c. sugar & cup of Monk Fruit (I used the Lakanto brand from Costco)

1 c. water

1 (12-oz.) package fresh cranberries

2 tsp. orange zest

Kosher salt

DIRECTIONS

In a small saucepan over low heat, combine sugar and water until sugar dissolves. Add cranberries and cook until they burst, 10 minutes. Stir in orange zest and a pinch of salt.

Remove saucepan from heat and let cool completely, then transfer to a resalable container and refrigerate.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS Healthy hack: GHEE TO ADD MORE FLAVOR WHILE USING LESS FAT

2 pounds Brussels sprouts

1/4 cup olive oil

1 teaspoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons honey

Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat the oven to 425F. Meanwhile, trim the bottoms from the sprouts if they appear dry or yellowed, and peel away the loose outer leaves. Cut each Brussels sprout in half through the stem.

Place the Brussels sprouts on a rimmed baking sheet. Add the oil and toss to coat. Season with the salt and pepper and toss to coat again. Arrange them cut-side down.

Roast, stirring halfway through, until the leaves are dark brown and crisp and the undersides of the sprouts are browned, 25 to 30 minutes total. Drizzle with the balsamic vinegar and honey and toss to coat. Serve immediately. Recipe from @thekitchn

SWEET POTATO SALAD-Healthy hack: HIGHER FIBER THAN REGULAR SALAD & FULL OF ANTIOXDANTS

3 large sweet potatoes peeled and cubed (about 2 lb.)

1 small red onion, thinly sliced into half moons

2 tbsp. Avocado oil or Ghee (warm it up so its liquid)

S & P

Freshly ground black pepper

1/2 c. dried cranberries

1/2 c. crumbled goat cheese

1/4 c. freshly chopped parsley

Dressing:

Add these ingredients to a bowl

1 cup olive oil

cup of balsamic vinegar.

3 tbsp. of water

1 tbsp. of maple syrup

1 heaping tsp of Dijon mustard

1 big smashed chopped clove of garlic

Salt & pepper & EBTB seasoning

Wisk away and then let it sit and let the ingredients mingle (like a dating site but better)

Feel free to get fancy with your own additions but the key point? 3:1 ratio of oil to vinegar.

Preheat oven to 400. On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss sweet potatoes and red onion in oil then season with salt and pepper.

Distribute them evenly on sheet in a single layer. Bake until tender, about 20 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes then transfer to a large bowl.

Toss sweet potatoes with dressing, cranberries, goat cheese, and parsley. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Recipe modified from @delish

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Healthy Living: Cutting calories, not traditions - Q13 News Seattle

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Prevent holiday weight gain with healthy living tips from UAB – Alabama NewsCenter

The holiday season is a time with family, friends and fun, but it is also a time filled with lots of food and sweets.

Exercise and dieting can be hard to maintain during this time of year; but Payton Joyner, assistant director of Fitness and Well-being, and Katie Ellison, M.S., from the University of Alabama at Birminghams FitWell team with University Recreation, have some tips to help you stay healthy this holiday season.

Exercise

Finding the time to exercise can be tricky during this time of year especially if you are traveling. If you are away from home and do not have access to your local gym, Joyner suggests finding ways to get outside.

If you are out of town, search for local hiking trails or parks with access to fitness equipment; it can be a great way to get some exercise while also sightseeing, Joyner said. If youre around children, offer to take them to the park, and work on your push-ups and pull-ups on the playground.

Spending time outside could also help reduce some of the stress that can come with the holidays, even if you are just relaxing. A recent UAB study suggests that spending 20 minutes in an urban park makes people happier regardless of whether they are engaged in exercise during the visit.

If weather is preventing you from enjoying the outdoors, Joyner suggests turning to the internet to find workouts.

You can find a large variety of free flexibility, yoga and meditation videos online. Or, if that is not really your style of workout, hit up a circuit-style, bodyweight workout that focuses on higher reps and shorter breaks to keep your heart rate up, Joyner said.

Joyner suggests an eight-step workout to help you stay active if you are stuck indoors:

Complete as many repetitions of each exercise as you can within 20 to 30 seconds, Joyner said. Take 20 to 60 seconds to rest between exercises, or you can immediately move into the next exercise to make things harder. Complete this circuit two to fivetimes.

Joyner recommends including a warm-up of your choice to get your body ready before you begin and a cool-down to help your body ease back to resting.

Healthy eating

The holidays are filled with lots of treats, and for some it can be an overwhelming task to stay on a diet. Ellison has some suggestions to help you prepare for the holiday food.

Another way to be mindful during holiday meals is to substitute regular recipe ingredients and make dishes more nutritious. To do this, Ellison recommends:

The holidays are a time to spend with family and friends, and with a few smart choices you can enjoy all of the traditions and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

This story originally appeared on the University of Alabama at Birminghams UAB News website.

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Prevent holiday weight gain with healthy living tips from UAB - Alabama NewsCenter

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Healthy Living: November 19, 2019 – WABI

BANGOR, Maine (WABI) - Fall and Winter are typically the worst times for "cold and flu" season, when lots of respiratory illness circulates among the population. Most of these illnesses are mild and have similar symptoms that may including congestion, sore throat, cough, and fever.

Viral Croup is one such illness in small children that starts like any other "cold" with congestion, but the symptoms quickly become quite specific. Croup mostly affects children less than 5 years old and tends to occur mostly in the Fall. In croup, the windpipe/trachea and voice box /vocal cords become swollen and this causes its distinctive symptoms. The cough from croup is classically described as "barking" or "seal-like". The voice becomes raspy and there can be a high-pitched squeaking sound when breathing IN; this is known as stridor. All these symptoms become worse with agitation or crying.

The reason these noises are so specific is that air is harder to pull into the lungs because the swelling makes the size of the windpipe smaller. Its much harder to breath through a drinking straw, than say, a snorkel. Croup targets young children because their breathing tubes are small to begin with because they are small people. A little bit of swelling makes a much bigger difference to them than older children or adults who have the same amount of swelling but are starting with much larger breathing tubes.

Happily, most cases of croup are mild and don't need any special treatment. Keeping your child calm and comfortable while encouraging fluids and rest as you normally would with any minor illness is often all that is required. Tylenol and ibuprofen can be used for any fever or other pain. A cool mist humidifier or steam filled bathroom may improve the barking cough, sometimes dramatically. If its cool and moist outside, taking the child outside may provide some relief.If a child with croup is still eating, drinking and sleeping well they should be fine to stay home. The illness usually runs it course in a week or less. Sometimes, however, it needs more medical attention. If the stridor is worsening quickly, or breathing becoming fast and labored, seek care right away. With more serious croup you can see the notch at the base of the neck suck in during each breath and maybe the chest as well. If your child has trouble talking, swallowing or is drooling a lot you should go to an emergency room right away. Same thing if they become lethargic and listless or very anxious appearing.

There is a type of nebulizer (racemic epinephrine) that can be given that will temporarily help relieve the airway swelling of croup. When this is required, steroids are also typically given for a more lasting effect. Often only one dose of steroids is required. A small number of patients will need admission to the hospital for repeat doses of nebulizers and steroids and very rarely may even require the help of a respirator until the airway inflammation improves.

It has been an active Fall for croup in our region so if your small child starts barking like a seal, don't panic! Be ready to handle it at home as described above and prepared to seek medical attention on the off chance it gets worse.

References: 1. http://www.mayoclinic.org./diseases-conditions/croup 2.https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/croup3.www.healthychildren.org/croup

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Healthy Living: November 19, 2019 - WABI

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Health briefs 11-25-19 | Healthy Living – Uniontown Herald Standard

Events

n Medicares annual open enrollment period runs through Dec. 7. The APPRISE Program can help answer questions. Those interested in having a free, confidential plan comparison done can contact a local Area Agency On Agings APPRISE Program to meet with a certified Medicare counselor to discuss needs. For a list of enrollment centers and their dates and times open for enrollment or contact information about local Area Agency on Aging offices, call Southwestern Pennsylvania Human Services, Inc. at 724-489-8080.

n Mon Valley Hospital will host a hernia education and screening event at 5 p.m. Dec. 16 in the educational conference center. Arshad Bachelani, M.D., of Mon-Vale Surgical Associates, will conduct individual screenings following a brief educational talk on hernias. Registration: 724-258-1333 or http://www.monvalleyhospital.com.

n Adagio Health has moved to a new location at Uniontown Professional Plaza, 205 Easy Street, near Uniontown Hospital. Health care services include family planning and reproductive care for women and men, breast and cervical cancer screening, and adult care basics such as immunizations and screening. The majority of patients receiving healthcare services are women who are uninsured, underinsured or need access to confidential family planning services. Adagio Health also serves thousands of children and families through education and nutrition programs including WIC and Power Up (SNAP-Ed), along with offering tobacco cessation programs aimed at teens and adults. All services are provided through funding from foundations, the State and Federal government and in partnership with a variety of local organizations and other funders.

Courses

n Exercise classes, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Center in the Woods, 130 Woodland Court, Brownsville. Classes include chair dancing at 9:30 a.m. followed by healthy steps at 11 a.m. Information: 724-938-3554.

n Monongahela Valley Hospital will host an American Heart Association Heartsaver CPR/AED course 4-8 p.m. Nov. 26 and 8 a.m. to noon Dec. 17 in the education conference center. Adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR/AED) classes are offered by Monongahela Valley Hospital. The fee for the class is $50 to cover the class and required materials. Registration: 724-258-1333 or https://www.monvalleyhospital.com/registration.asp.

n Monongahela Valley Hospital will host American Heart Association Family and Friends CPR/AED 9-11 a.m. Nov. 26 and 4-6 p.m. Dec. 17 in the simulation center. This course is designed for the layperson that has little or no medical training, and is taught by a certified instructor. This course is for people who do not need a certification card for a job. Content includes an orientation to CPR for adult, child, infants, choking and use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Cost of this course is $35 to cover the cost of the book, which includes a class participation card. Registration: 724-258-1333 or https://www.monvalleyhospital.com/registration.asp.

n Monongahela Valley Hospital will host a diabetes management program 9-11 a.m. Dec. 3, 10 and 17 and 6-8 p.m. Dec. 4, 11 and 18 in the education conference center. Topics include the importance of controlling blood sugars, diabetes medications, lifestyle changes, meal planning and methods to reduce the risk of complications. The program is three consecutive Tuesdays. Registration is required at least one week prior to the start date of class by calling 724-258-1483.

n Mon Valley Hospital will host an advanced carbohydrate counting program 9-11 a.m. Dec. 12 in the educational conference center. The program is a diabetes self-management class designed to educate on how to count carbohydrate content in food to improve blood sugar control. Topics include how to track effects of carbohydrates and blood sugar, glycemic index and how to read food nutrition labels. Registration is required at least one week prior to the start of class by calling 724-258-1483.

Support groups

n Breaking Addiction, HEAL Group for Men. The small group meeting for men is designed to help those who have a desire to overcome addictions and find a new direction in life. All sessions give instruction for practical life skills through Biblical Principles found in Gods Word. Discussion and interaction are encouraged at each group meeting. They are scheduled at 7 p.m. the first, second and fourth Thursdays of the month at Eagle Ranch Ministries Inc., 1579 Pleasant Valley Road, Mount Pleasant. Registration: 724-542-7243.

n Breaking Addiction, HEAL Group for Women. The small group meeting for women is designed to help those who have a desire to overcome addictions and find a new direction in life. All sessions give instruction for practical life skills through Biblical Principles found in Gods Word. Discussion and interaction are encouraged at each group meeting. The meetings are scheduled for 7 p.m. every Tuesday at Eagle Ranch Ministries Inc., 1579 Pleasant Valley Road, Mount Pleasant. Registration: 724-244-5261 or 412-969-8520.

n Caregiver support group, 6:30-8:30 p.m., the fourth Wednesday of the month at Lafayette Manor. Classes meet in the new physical therapy department. Light refreshments are provided. Open for family and friends who have lost a loved one to cancer. Registration: http://www.excelahealth.org or 877-771-1234.

n Mon Valley Hospital will host a suicide bereavement support group 12:30 p.m. Dec. 9 and Dec. 23 in the education conference center. The support group is a four-month program that meets the second and fourth Mondays of each month and is led by a licensed psychologist and is free and open to all those touched by suicide. Required registration: 724-678-3601.

n Mon Valley Hospital will host an Alzheimers support group 6-8 p.m. Dec. 10 in the education conference center. The free support group is designed to help the families, friends and caregivers of those suffering from Alzheimers disease or other forms of dementia. Discussion topics include the challenges of coping with this disorder as well as techniques for managing stress and methods of encouraging social engagement. Reservations: 724-258-1333.

n Monongahela Valley Hospital will host a Ostomy support group 2-3 p.m., Dec. 19 in the educational conference center. This support group is free and open to all persons with ostomies and their families and friends. The group meets the third Thursday of each month. Information: 724-258-1773.

n Grief support group, 6-8 p.m. first Tuesday of every month, at the St. John the Evangelist Church on West Crawford Avenue in Connellsville. The group is a collaborative effort for those facing grief due to the loss of a loved one from addiction. Information: 724-628-6840.

n Al-Anon Family Groups, 8 p.m. Wednesdays, Trinity Church parlor, Fayette and Morgantown streets, Uniontown. Please enter at the handicapped ramp entrance. A second is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Christian Church, Pittsburgh Street, Connellsville. These meetings are for anyone who has been affected by or is having problems from someone elses drinking. Information: al-anon.alateen.org or pa-al-anon.org.

n Survivors of Incest Anonymous group, 6:30-8 p.m. the first and third Mondays of the month, excluding holidays. This 12-step recovery program is meant for men and women aged 18 or older who were sexually abused by a trusted person as a child. The group meets at the Mount Macrina Retreat Center. A similar group, Healing Friends, is from 6:30-7:30 p.m., East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Information: peopleofcourage@gmail.com siawso.org, or healingfriends8@gmail.com.

n Missing Piece of My Heart support group, 6-8 p.m. the last Thursday of each month at the Crime Victims Center conference room in the Oliver Square Plaza. The group is for families who have lost a child to a violent crime. Information: 724-438-1470.

n Silver Generation support group, 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays, East End United Community Center, Uniontown. The program is for ages 55 and older. Information: 724-437-1660.

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Health briefs 11-25-19 | Healthy Living - Uniontown Herald Standard

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Stoneham Couple Benefits From Healthy Aging Tai Chi Program – Patch.com

Dick Van Dyke is the reason Eddie Di Muzzio can now lift one leg off the floor. Just a year ago, he couldn't imagine balancing himself without holding onto a chair.

Eddie and his wife, Pauline, were watching a television program hosted by the actor/comedian Dick Van Dyke. Van Dyke, who is 93 years old and an advocate of a healthy aging lifestyle, was promoting the Tai Cheng program, a form of Tai Chi, particularly geared toward older adults. He credited Tai Chi for improving his mobility. Van Dyke's program convinced Eddie and Pauline to give Tai Chi a try to help improve their coordination and balance, which had been a problem for them for years.

As Stoneham residents, the couple signed up for a Dr. Paul Lam's Tai Chi for Health course at the Stoneham Senior Center. The course is offered through Mystic Valley Elder Services as part of its Healthy Aging Program. It consists of a free eight-week, one-hour class on learning the basics of Tai Chi. The couple was hooked and have been taking classes for more than a year.

Prior to taking the Tai Chi classes, Eddie could hardly stand. He had pain and stiffness throughout his legs and suffered from light neuropathy in his foot. And when he did stand, his balance was off. Pauline shared the same problem, her coordination while walking was poor. Eddie, at nearly 88 years old, and Pauline, being 84, just accepted it as a burden of getting old.

Eddie and Pauline are currently taking their third Healthy Aging Program Tai Chi course, this one at the Milano Family Senior Center in Melrose. Because the Tai Chi courses are so popular, the class was filled at the Stoneham location. But that did not stop them from taking classes.

"We really enjoy the class and the company," says Eddie. "Many of the same people take the classes so we get to know one another. There is only one other male in the class, so we hang out together."

Eddie admits that it took him a while to learn the steps and get acclimated to the moves. But as he learned when he began to play the piano back in the day, it is all about practice. He is beginning to master the movements and can feel the difference in his legs with more flexibility and less pain. Pauline can see a major difference in her walking; her coordination is much better than it was a year ago.

Another reason the couple continues to take the course is because of their class leader, Susan Becker. "Susan is a people person," says Pauline. "She is very personable and a great leader. She explains the process making sure all of us understand it and will work with you until you have the movement down."

Both agree that having Susan lead their class really adds to the sessions. "She's an excellent teacher," says Eddie. "She goes over the actions until we have retained what we have learned."

Coincidently, Susan recently won the Kate Lorig Healthy Living Innovation Award, which is given by the Healthy Living Center of Excellence annually to recognize the innovative efforts of individuals or organizations for their creative thinking, commitment, and implementation of ideas that improve the quality of life for older adults through healthy aging programs.

For more information on Mystic Valley Elder Services' Healthy Aging Programs, please contact Donna Covelle, Healthy Aging Program Coordinator, at (781) 388-4867 or dcovelle@mves.org.

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Stoneham Couple Benefits From Healthy Aging Tai Chi Program - Patch.com

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What this sunny, religious town in California teaches us about living longer – CNN

Experts say that's because Loma Linda has one of the highest concentrations of Seventh-day Adventists in the world. The religion mandates a healthy lifestyle and a life of service to the church and community, which contributes to their longevity.

Wareham was 100 years old at the time and still mowed his front yard.

"I never had stress," said Wareham, a life-long Seventh-day Adventist. "I have a philosophy: You do the best you can. And the things you can't do anything about, don't give any thought to them."

A heart surgeon by trade, Wareham assisted in surgeries until he was 95 years old, and told Gupta that he would still be able to operate at the age of 100.

"I could do open heart surgery right now. My hands are steady, my eyes are good," Wareham said. "My blood pressure is 117. I have noticed no deterioration in my mental ability with my age. If you gave me something to memorize, I would memorize it now just as quickly as when I was 20."

The role of vegetarianism

"The average for non-vegetarians is only about two ounces of total meat a day, which is quite low," Orlich said.

What does that vegetarian lifestyle accomplish? A lower weight, for one. Vegans in the study had an average body mass index (BMI) of 23, well below the healthy cutoff of 25, Orlich said. Meat eaters in the study -- no matter how little they ate -- had an average BMI of 29, just shy of being considered obese.

Healthy lifestyle factors

Other key factors to longevity: Only 1% of the Seventh-day Adventist community in the study smokes. Little to no alcohol is consumed. Daily exercise out in the fresh air of nature is the norm. The church advocates a life of service, so dedication to volunteering, humanitarian and mission work is typical, which contributes to a sense of community.

Religion is key to their lives. Adventists have a "weekly date with God," in which they are to attend church, do no work, and dedicate the day to rest and rejuvenation.

"If your life is God directed, don't interfere with him, he is a pretty big person," Wareham told Gupta with a chuckle. "It gets you free of stress."

"Those that were religiously engaged had a healthier diet, did more exercise and had more emotional wellness and less depression," said study co-author Kelly Morton, a professor of medicine and psychology at Loma Linda University. "And they did live longer."

Morton is deep into a new study analyzing the resilience characteristics of the oldest members of the community, those over age 100. Again, they are finding that religious engagement is an important factor in their longevity.

"It seems being highly connected to this church relationship, to this religious engagement activity, gives you the community of wellness to carry you into your later years," Morton said.

Add all of these factors together and what do you get? A healthier body, less likely to succumb to diseases tied to obesity, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer and heart disease. Research on Seventh-day Adventists, which began in the 1950s, has consistently shown that connection.

"In our Adventist Health Study-2 people tended to have lower blood pressures, lower LDL cholesterol, less prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, and less diabetes," Orlich said. "Broadly defined vegetarians, which includes the pesco- and the semi-vegetarian, have a lower risk of colorectal cancer by about 22%. Pesco-vegetarians have a lower risk for prostate cancer."

"If you had all those factors in the right direction, so to speak, they predicted about a 10-year differential in mortality within the Seventh-day Adventist population," Orlich said."

Is it too late?

Few of us practice these healthy lifestyle habits, much less do them all at once. The good news, says Orlich, is that it's never too late to start.

"The bulk of evidence suggests that changing a few simple lifestyle factors can have a profound difference in the risk of major diseases and the likelihood of living a long life," Orlich said. "The body has an amazing ability to, um, you know, heal itself to some degree.

Take smoking for example. Many Baby Boomers are reformed smokers, addicted at a time when smoking was the norm in society.

"If you've stopped smoking for more than say, 20 or 30 years, you're hard to distinguish from somebody who has never smoked," said Orlich.

And if you're a couch potato, the good news is that starting any sort of exercise is going to be beneficial for you.

"The biggest bang for your buck is definitely going from little or no intentional physical activity to just a modest amount, like a bit of moderate walking a couple times a week," Orlich said. "So it's rarely too late to start adopting a healthy lifestyle. People can usually get impressive benefits even in a short length of time."

Correction: An earlier version gave an incorrect English translation of Loma Linda.

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What this sunny, religious town in California teaches us about living longer - CNN

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