Page 21234..1020..»

Category : Human Longevity

In COVID-19 Crisis, Older Canadians Are More Resilient than Younger Generations, Research Finds – The Suburban Newspaper

Edward Jones, in partnership with Age Wave, released a landmark study on Aug. 4 that takes a comprehensive look at retirement in Canada, focusing specifically on four central pillars: health, family, purpose and finances.

The study examines trends affecting the rapid transformation of retirement in Canada as the country's aging population approaches this new stage of life. This includes the impact of COVID-19 which has accelerated many of the trends unearthed in this study.

Despite COVID-19's severe and disproportionate impact on the health of aging adults, older Canadians reported they are coping far better than younger ones. "The Four Pillars of the New Retirement" study of 1,000 Canadian respondents across five-generations revealed that 38 per cent of Gen Z and 36 per cent of millennials said they have suffered mental health declines since the pandemic began, while only 20 per cent of baby boomers and 7 per cent of silent generation respondents said the same. The majority of Canadian retirees (51 per cent) defined retirement as a whole new chapter filled with new choices, freedoms and challenges, and they do so in a more holistic way across four important areas of health, family, purpose and finance.

"We've certainly seen COVID-19's disruptive influence on finances, with the pandemic impacting retirement timing and financial confidence," said David Gunn, Country Leader, Edward Jones Canada. "However, the pandemic has brought families closer and renewed the focus on important discussions about planning earlier for retirement, saving more for emergencies and even talking through end-of-life plans and long-term care costs."

"COVID-19's impact forever changed the reality of many Canadians, yet we've observed a resilience among Canadian retirees in contrast to younger generations," said Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., psychologist/gerontologist and founder and CEO of Age Wave. "Older Canadians recognize the value of a long-term view, and so as they think about their lives, longevity and legacy, they're able to pull from an array of experiences that help them weather current storms, feel gratitude about many aspects of their lives and still plan for the future."

The four pillars to living well in the "new retirement"

The study goes beyond the impacts of COVID-19 and outlines what makes today's retirement "new". Canada's retirement landscape is unique - increasing longevity and a groundswell of Boomers entering retirement make this one of the most significant societal shifts in history. The study found, changing attitudes and aspirations coupled with external forces (i.e. economic downturns, the pandemic, technology, etc.) have drastically changed the expectations of those approaching or entering retirement and will shape what retirement looks like for generations to come.

The study identified four key pillars for living well in the "new retirement":

When it comes to living well in retirement, 97 per cent of retirees and 99 per cent of those age 75 and over, say that health is more important than wealth. 91 per cent of Canadian retirees say it's never too late to improve health, however, there is an intention/action gap as 51 per cent of Canadian retirees don't exercise regularly, and 33 per cent say they don't maintain a healthy diet. While physical health usually declines with age, for many Canadians mental health rises.

A bright spot coming out of the pandemic is the deepening of family ties. Two-thirds of Gen Z define family as "anyone they love and care for, regardless of whether they are related by blood, marriage or adoption." They believe in "families of affinity" or families of choice. As we approach what is expected to be the largest generational wealth transfer in recent memory, retirees cite they worry about their children more (44 per cent) and are willing to do whatever it takes, personally and financially, to support family members in need, even if it means sacrificing their own financial security (63 per cent). The study also found, 47 per cent of Canadians overall and 30 per cent of Canadians age 65 and over have yet to begin discussing their end-of-life care preferences with their family or close friends.

Retirees with a strong sense of purpose are happier, healthier and live longer, according to the study. This cohort reports they find their strongest sense of purpose from spending time with loved ones (72 per cent) and many (46 per cent) find purpose by being generous or helping others, particularly women (54 per cent). They are also looking for meaningful ways to carve out their free time. They don't just want to keep busy; they want to make useful and rewarding contributions to community and family. As the country's population continues to age, 89 per cent of Canadians agree that there should be more ways for retirees to help in their communities.

According to the study, a chief financial goal amongst retirees, is to have enough resources to provide security (48 per cent) and the freedom to live the lives they want (47 per cent). Retirees' greatest financial worry is not economic uncertainty like recessions, inflation or taxes, despite the disruption associated with COVID-19. Their greatest concerns are encountering unexpected expenses (54 per cent) and the cost of health care, including long-term care (47 per cent). Pre-retirees express even higher concerns about health and long-term care (59 per cent) with three quarters of those who plan to retire (74 per cent) stating they have no idea what their health and long-term care costs may be in retirement.

"Beyond finances, we can help our clients envision and truly realize a holistic and fulfilling retirement, which, we know includes decisions about their health, family and purpose," said Gunn. "Empathy and knowledge allow us to better serve as a trusted advisor to our clients in a human-centered way and work together to achieve what's most important to Canadians and their families."

While the above findings feature a selection of data regarding the new definition of retirement, further examination of the four pillars of health, family, purpose and finances reveal their highly intertwined nature and influence in shaping retirees' overall quality of life. For the complete study, please visit http://www.edwardjones.ca/newretirement

Edward Jones is a full-service investment dealer with more than 850 financial advisors in Canadian communities from coast-to-coast.

Edward Jones Canada, http://www.edwardjones.ca

Age Wave, http://www.agewave.com

AB

Read more from the original source:
In COVID-19 Crisis, Older Canadians Are More Resilient than Younger Generations, Research Finds - The Suburban Newspaper

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Scientists Found a Way to Tweak Proteins That Prolongs Life of Roundworms, Will It Work on Humans Too? – Science Times

Scientists from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have found a way to tweak proteins that control cellular activity levels. That means they were able to turn up and down levels in roundworm that prolongs its lifespan.

In that sense, drugs could be designed to combat age-related problems and increase the lifespan of humans.

The enzyme in roundworms that the scientists tweaked is responsible for converting the sugar into energy when the cellular level is low, in which they found that it can be controlled. Like roundworms, humans also have these proteins, which means that there is a possibility of developing longevity-promoting drugs.

(Photo: Pixabay)Scientists Found A Way To Tweak Proteins That Prolongs Life of Roundworms, Will It Work on Humans Too?

Read: Long Life: Here's How to Extend Your Lifespan According to Science

One of the most commonly used in lab testing, the Korean scientists used the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans(C. elegans) for their study, published in Science Advances.

C. elegans experienced a boost in its lifespan when the scientists altered a couple of proteins responsible for monitoring the cellular energy levels.

These proteins are the VRK-1 and AMPK, and both work in tandem in roundworm cells. VRK-1's job is to tell AMPK to stick a phosphate molecule on it. AMPK's role then is to monitor the energy levels in cells when it is running low.

In short, VRK-1controls AMPK, and AMPK controls the cellular energy levels. The researchers were able to turn up and down the cellular activity that tells it to produce VRK-1 protein through various biological research tools, such as introducing foreign genes into the roundworm.

Pretty much, this gene remained unchanged over the course of evolution, which is why most complex organisms, including humans, have it.

According to lead author Sang-soon Park, he and his colleagues successfully increased the production of VRK-1 protein that boosts the lifespan of roundworms. They found that its activity increased when the worm has low cellular energy levels.

Simply saying, there is reduced mitochondrial respiration, and a decline in its function are associated with age-related illness. Mitochondriais the powerhouse of a cell.

However, the mild inhibition of mitochondrial respiration has shown to promote a longer lifespan for other species like flies and mammals.

Read Also:Scientists to Improve "Longevity Gene" Efficiency in Battling the Aging Process

When Park and his colleagues tried tweaking the same protein in humans, they found that they could also replicate the same process that occurs in roundworms.

Moreover, Professor Seung-Jae V. Lee, one of the researchers, explained that their research raises a very intriguing possibility that VRK-1 can also increase human lifespan. Perhaps drugs that promote longevity can be developed to alter the activity of VRK-1.

In that way, humans will be able to combat age-related illnesses that involve the disruption of chemical reactions in the body and diseases of the mitochondria.

But the researchers advise conducting more research to better understanding the workings of VRK-1 before developing longevity drugs. They added that they still need to figure out the exact mechanics of how AMPK controls energy levels in cells.

Read More: Are Scientists Close to Discovering a Way to Delay Aging?

Read the original here:
Scientists Found a Way to Tweak Proteins That Prolongs Life of Roundworms, Will It Work on Humans Too? - Science Times

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

What are ACE scores and why do they matter? – Record Searchlight

Shasta County health officials revealed a 5-year public health plan that focuses on prevention and fighting Adverse Childhood Experiences.

When Kaiser Permanente and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the study to measure Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) levels in Shasta County in 2012, the results they found were striking.

The ACE study examined categories of childhood physical and emotional abuse and neglect. It measured household dysfunction includingdomestic violence, mental illnessand substance abusethat create toxic stress leading to neuro-system changes during child development.

The higher the ACE score a child has, the higher the risk of developing chronic illnesses like heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), depression and cancer.

More: Hotline launches to support Shasta County parents and caregivers through COVID-19

Shasta Countys ACE score was found to be double the state average. Forty percent of the adults surveyed in Shasta County reported a score of 4 or higher.

Since the study published, schools, youth centersand even law enforcement officials have adopted trauma-sensitive methods to support youth trying to develop healthy coping mechanisms to overcome trauma.

Almost all Shasta County school districts have attended a trauma-informed training or received ACEs training with the Shasta County Office of Education.

The Happy Valley Primary School was able to overwhelmingly decrease bad behavior offenses in the last three years, Principal Shelly Craig said. The Shasta County Probation Department began tracking juvenile behavior patterns in order to reverse them as well, Chief Probation Officer Tracie Nealsaid viaemail.

Peer Court jury training by the Anderson Police in 2019.(Photo: Youth Options Shasta)

Susan Wilson, executive director of Youth Options Shasta and steering committee member of the Strengthening Families Collaborative, said the study was the confirmation of a problem that youth groups and health agency administrators knew had beenprevalent for a long time.

We have struggled in the northern part of California. We have struggled for a long time. We have struggled because we have low education levels. We have struggled because we have high poverty. We have high poor results in physical health. Statistics show that our kids are not learning at the same level as the kids typical in California, Wilson said.

Before the study published, Wilson and other community organizers were already putting together the Strengthening Families Collaborative curriculum, and introducing Protective Factors for Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders variables that promote developmental competencies in youth.

All these things happened together, not as a result of the ACEs study. The ACEs study was almost a confirmation of the problem that we knew we had. In other words, we knew kids were not doing well, Wilson said. But we didnt have the background of ACEs, the study, the data, to inform us. When we did the study and got the results we sat back like wow.

After the ACEs study, organizations like Youth Options Shasta, which connects youth to peer court and restorative justice practices, began to incorporate some additional screening when evaluating teenagers, an at-risk population with high ACE scores that the group works with.

Peer court youth jury deliberations in the jury room.(Photo: Youth Options Shasta)

ACEs are predictable and as a result, preventable, said Kelly Rizzi, director of School and District Support at Shasta County Office of Education. Rizzi joined the Shasta County Office of Education seven years ago to address the literacy issue in Shasta County, but learned the bleak literacy levels were related to trauma.

Many of the students who were struggling with literacy were living in toxic stress conditions and persistent fear, Rizzi said, damaging their amygdala the part of the brain that plays an importantrolesin the expression of emotion and behavior. That unrelenting stress can also shutoff the learning and growth that takes place in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, which is linked to decision making andreasoning.

What we really have is a regulation gap, not an education gap, Rizzi said. What we learned is we can teach kids to self-regulate. Your ACE score doesnt define you; it informs you and empowers you to make different decisions for yourself, your family and community.

More: Coronavirus live updates: Twelve more Shasta County residents test positive

In the last ten years a whole generation has come into adulthood but the population is changing slowly. To measure the effectiveness of the community's response to address high ACE scores in real time, it starts with the children, said Donnell Ewert, Director of the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency.

Some experts question whether its wise to ask children about traumatic life events to generate a trend, out of concern that itll have an adverse effect on young people. Organizations and schools have begun efforts to respond to ACEs, but the challenge is measuring the effectiveness of the initiatives, Ewert said.

He said that the agency has frameworks in place to measure behavior shifts in people involved with the probation department, as well as the homeless populationand other high-risk populations.

But, Ewert said, the high ACE scores will not change dramatically in a short period of time.It will take years to see a difference.

Almost all Shasta County school districts have adopted a "social-emotional learning" program in the last fiveyears and noticed a reduction in bad behavior, Rizzi said. That is one way of tracking the effectiveness of ACEs reduction efforts.

Peer Court trial held in Shasta Lake City Council Chambers in 2016.(Photo: Youth Options Shasta)

The reality is, if youre not talking about it on a regular basis, it goes by the wayside, Rizzi said. Before COVID-19, schools began holding ACEs training for parents but now we cant hold gatherings. Our best bet is to teach the teachers and kids in classes.

At Happy Valley Primary School, Craig, the principal, began assessing the response to students basic needs by measuring daily and weekly data ranking bad behavior at a low level, medium level or high level.

Happy Valley has a total of about 490 students, with 240 primary students inpre-K through third grade. The trauma-informed practices, behavior dataand systems Craig adopted when she began working at the district three years ago have benefited the student body and decreased incidents of bad behavior significantly, she said.Students are taught to self-regulate by relating to issues and identifying coping methods so they can return to learning.

More: What will the new school year look like in Shasta County school districts?

The longevity data is going to be crucial moving forward, but in the first year as principal, I was spending 80% of my time focused on student discipline, and as Im transitioning out of this year (third year), I would say 7% of my time is spent on student discipline, Craig said. Its a significant culture change. It just looks different.

Reversing the risky effects of high ACE scores in the community is difficult but not impossible, Wilson said.

Youth advisory members attend the annual California Youth Court Summit trip in 2014.(Photo: Youth Options Shasta)

Another method of measuring the effectiveness of the community response can be tracking the number of toxicology screenings at birth whichcould indicate that mothers are paying attention to risks caused by ACEs, such as substance abuse.

People who successfully complete probation demonstrate an ability to overcome the high level of ACE scores and transform negative behavior patterns, she added.

At the Shasta County Probation Department, Neal collects data to include short, moderateand long term goals and analyzes the data every sixmonths. Staff is trained to develop cognitive skills and work with traumatized youth, she said.

Some key observation points include school graduation rates, employment, truancy, parental involvement and the level of conflict within the home. Success with mental health and substance abuse treatments are also considered.

"There is an emphasis on gender-specific trauma groups and exploring what trauma impacts people, developing awareness to triggers and healthy coping skills," Neal said in an email. "Being involved in the juvenile criminal justice system creates an enormous amount of stress and trauma in itself."

Nada Atieh is a Report For America corps member and education reporter focusing on childhood trauma and the achievement gap for the Redding Record Searchlight. Follow her on Twitter at @nada_atieh. Help local journalism thrive by subscribing today!

Read or Share this story: https://www.redding.com/story/news/2020/08/04/california-shasta-county-adverse-childhood-experiences-test-aces-study/5559233002/

More here:
What are ACE scores and why do they matter? - Record Searchlight

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Are very long-lived trees immortal and what can they teach humans? – ABC News

While humans are all too familiar with the ravages of getting older, many trees seem to handle ageing a lot better.

Certain trees can live for thousands of years and appear to be immortal.

But not everyone is convinced these old timers can escape death due to old age.

Regardless, could humans with their relatively puny lifespans have something to learn from these ancient trees? Some scientists think so.

Establishing how old the oldest living tree is depends a bit on which plants are in the running for the title.

You could argue that Australia's Wollemi pine, which has been cloning itself for more than 60 million years, deserves the title. But that's kind of cheating because this involves multiple stems growing from the one rootstock.

This is why the oldest tree in the world is generally regarded as a single-stemmed bristlecone pine called Pinus longaeva.

This species can live to around 5,000 years and does well where most other plants cannot even grow in rocky, dry, high-altitude areas in the United States.

What's amazing is that scientists have not so far been able to show that getting older directly affects the health of such millennial trees, plant biologist Sergi Munne-Bosch from the University of Barcelona says.

It's because of this, some say these trees are essentially immortal.

But in a recent article, Professor Munne-Bosch argues that it's likely even ancient trees could die from old age assuming something else doesn't kill them first.

He emphasises that there's a difference between ageing, which is about how long an organism has lived, and age-related deterioration, which is referred to as senescence.

"Just because we can't track senescence in long-lived trees doesn't mean they are immortal."

Professor Munne-Bosch points to recent research on centuries-old Ginkgo biloba trees that found no evidence of senescence.

The study was the first to look for evidence of age-related changes in cells of the cambium, a layer just beneath the bark that contains cells that can produce new tissue throughout the plant's life.

It confirmed the long-lived trees, which in this case were up to 667 years old, were just as healthy as younger ones says Professor Munne-Bosch.

"They grow very well, they produce seeds, they produce flowers, so they are healthy."

He points out that even though a 667-year-old tree seems old when compared to a human, it is relatively young for a ginkgo.

"This species can live for more than two millennia."

Professor Munne-Bosch argues that the ginkgo researchers' data shows that older trees had thinner vascular tissue and that this hints at possible age-related deterioration that would be more obvious in even older trees.

Yet despite this deterioration, he says these trees are more likely to die from insects, disease, fire, drought or loggers, than old age.

"For a species that can live for millennia, aging is not really a problem in evolutionary terms because they are much more likely to die of something else."

The problem is there are so few of these long-lived trees that it's hard to get the data to know for certain whether they can die of old age.

"We cannot prove it either way," Professor Munne-Bosch says, adding that age-related deterioration is likely to happen in these trees at such a different pace compared to in humans.

"For a Ginkgo biloba, six centuries is not as physiologically relevant as it is to us."

Brenda Casper, a professor of biology at the University of Pennsylvania says it's not clear that the changes found in the older Ginkgo biloba trees were necessarily detrimental to the tree.

But she agrees the low number of millennial trees makes it hard to study their longevity.

"It's difficult to find statistical evidence for senescence."

Even if there were enough trees, she says some of the age-related deterioration may be hard to detect, or we may not know what to look for.

"It's not just internal physiology per se but it's the interaction of the tree with its environment."

For example, she says it would be hard to measure whether age had made a tree more susceptible to disease, or less structurally sound so it's more likely to fall over in a windstorm.

Even if the jury is out on whether millennial trees are immortal, some experts say their longevity could be inspirational for medical research.

Professor Munne-Bosch says such trees can draw on a bag of tricks to help them "postpone death".

First is having a simple body plan with modular-like branches and roots. This means they can compartmentalise any damaged or dead roots or branches and work around them.

"They can lose part of leaves or roots and continue to be healthy..

And he says although 95 per cent of the trunk of a tree might be dead, the living cambium just beneath the bark is "one of the secrets of longevity" in trees.

Millennial trees have used the combination of these features to their best advantage and Professor Munne-Bosch says these tricks are providing a model for scientists researching the negative effects of ageing.

"Imagine if we could regenerate our lungs or circulatory system every year, we would be much healthier than we are."

Want more science plus health, environment, tech and more? Subscribe to our channel.

Professor of biomedical engineering at the University of New South Wales, Melissa Knothe Tate is one researcher who is inspired by millennial trees.

"They have units and if one unit breaks you can replace it with another unit."

Only a small percentage of an individual long-lived tree may be alive, but she argues it's all about survival of the cells that are able to regenerate the tree.

"Those that survive best, survive longest."

"Millennial trees are the best survivors because they've seen a lot."

While a tree and a human might seem worlds apart, Professor Knothe Tate sees the similarities, pointing to the role of stem cells in maintaining bones in humans.

She says cells add new layers to bone, like tree rings, to increase girth and when bone is injured, stem cells quickly help repair it.

"We're constantly renewing our bones and trees do something similar."

Professor Knothe Tate says she is using stem cells and new biomaterials that emulate tree cambium, to create replacement tissue in the lab, and has several patents for the work.

"I think about plants a lot when I'm up in the mountains and amongst the trees."

Professor Knothe Tate, who draws on her training in philosophy, biology and mechanical engineering for her work, sees other similarities that can inspire research.

For example, she likens the human brain to the network of roots and branches that helps a tree remain resilient if one part is damaged, another part can sometimes take up the slack.

"As parts of the brain are injured or die, it's remarkable what functionality we can retain,

"If we knew which of the brain's networks were essential for certain functions, we may be able to grow them."

Want even more science, health and tech? Join the conversation on Facebook.

Professor Knothe Tate also set up a science education project for girls that explores the parallels between the biomechanics of trees and bones. It was inspired by her observation of how huge trees sway like a blade of grass in the wind.

She has high hopes for the potential of regenerative medicine research that draws on knowledge from other disciplines like plant biology.

"Then we can then start to think about making ourselves immortal."

Plant biologist Professor Munne-Bosch is also enthusiastic.

"The future of medicine is very similar to what has evolved in millennial trees."

But while regenerating tissues will help humans live much longer, he doubts we will ever be immortal.

"It won't be forever, because we are more likely to die of something else, whether it be an accident or a pandemic."

Get all the latest science stories from across the ABC.

Read more:
Are very long-lived trees immortal and what can they teach humans? - ABC News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

The Power and the Glory of Comics A Review of "Green Lantern: 80th Anniversary" | A Comics Column – Nation Valley News

Cover by Liam Sharp 2020 DC Comics (used for review purposes only)

by Patrick R. Burger

Comics are the very real inheritors of the pulp fiction legacy, and the first appearance of the original Green Lantern in 1940, four years after pulp fiction master Robert E. Howards death, owes a lot to the pulp fiction heritage in general and, I believe, to Howards signal success in creating larger-than-life super-heroic characters (essentially proto-super-heroes). It seems self-evident that Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (creators of Superman), Bob Kane (creator of Batman) and Martin Nodell, the creator of the original Green Lantern, were influenced by the pulps. The supernatural-weird fiction pulp influence was apparent in the 1940 Green Lanterns magical powers, as was the detective-crime fiction pulp heritage in the flavour of the stories. With the 1959 re-boot of Green Lantern we were introduced to Hal Jordan as Green Lantern, but wooden art and a 10-year-old reading level, and the whites-only world that existed at that time in DC comics1resisted the emotional resonance of the revolution in comics storytelling that was going on at Marvel at the same time. But DC, and Green Lantern in particular, made up for lost time with the classic Denny ONeil and Neal Adams game-changing relevance stories of the early seventies, especially with this classic sequence:

Green Lantern by Neal Adams 1970 DC Comics (used for review purposes only)

Since then, Green Lantern comics have twinned a social conscience with the hallmark of the pulps and the comics that succeeded them epic adventure and action.

Before dipping into the stories, a comment about the character2and his (her and its) longevity is in order. The interesting thing about the Green Lanterns, particularly Hal Jordan, is that their super-power is essentially willpower. The Green Lantern power rings channel the willpower, but without willpower the rings can do little on their own. While it is a trope of super-heroes (and the pulp fiction heroes they descend from) that their willpower allows them to overcome great obstacles, this is even more significant in Green Lantern stories. Just as Robert E.Howards pulp heroes exhibit a Nietzschean will to power, the Green Lantern concept is essentially founded on that philosophy.

The 80th Anniversary celebration edition opens with a tale of the original Green Lantern from the 1940s, engineer Alan Scott, who survives a sabotage-induced rail disaster thanks to a mysterious green lantern. The story requires knowledge of the original Green Lanterns origin going in, as it is a sparse human-interest moment about Scott visiting the mother of the crash victim who pointed out the mysterious lantern to Scott before dying. The mothers speech wherein she resents Scott for surviving while her son had to die reveals, in perhaps a metaphoric way, that her dying son was the source of the light that saved Scott. James Tynion IVs writing is a bit abrupt, and Gary Franks art is somewhat static but this nod to the original Green Lantern has dignity and gravitas.

Last Will (featuring Hal Jordan for many of us the real Green Lantern) is a powerful and dramatic piece where Green Lantern crash lands on a planet and his malfunctioning power ring cannot tell him where the desolate moon-scape-like place he has landed is. To make matters worse, the ring only has enough energy to send three SOS messages. Heartfelt calls to the Green Lantern Corps, Batman (who Green Lantern reveals is a role model to him) and to Jordans long-time love interest, Carol Ferris, precede the moment where his ring fails and can no longer protect him from the atmosphere. Which he discovers he can breathe! It turns out hes been in the Nevada desert all along and his Justice League of America buddies end up having a laugh at his expense. Although the joke ending is a bit of a let-down, you totally buy the emotional lead-up to the joke-reveal and only then do you start thinking of logical problems: the existence of some vegetation should have tipped Hal off, and an experienced space explorer should have been able to recognize the constellations as being what youd see from Earth. But writer Geoff Johns effort is still commendable while Ivan Reis art is the best in the whole collection, with his flawless anatomy and great perspectives.

Green Lantern (Hal Jordan) by Ivan Reis 2020 DC Comics (used for review purposes only).

Of course, no Green Lantern anniversary issue could be without Green Lanterns greatest enemy, and The Meaning of Fear captures Sinestros brilliance, cowardice and cruelty. As he speaks to a dying Green Lantern about fear and willpower, Sinestros explanation about how his willpower is fuelled by his fear has a tragic logic that explains much in our world. When the dying Green Lantern refuses to feel fear, Sinestro kills him, and here writer Cullen Bunn brilliantly uses a trope of Green Lantern stories: how the power ring of a dying Green Lantern will find the nearest worthy recipient. The story ends with Sinestro taking off into space after the ring and we understand now that he has been killing every rookie recipient of that ring before they can amass the experience needed to defeat someone like Sinestro. Doug Mahnkes feathery art style leads to some beautiful panels but his anatomy does not have the perfection and robustness of Reis although his layouts are quite powerful.

The next story was a treat for those of us who bought Green Lantern comics in the 70s, for it teamed the legendary writer Denny ONeil with another DC great, artist Mike Grell. Touted as ONeils last story for DC, Time Alone revisits the early 70s Green Lantern and Green Arrow on their on-the-road discovering of America. For a time in the mid-70s it looked like Grell would be the artistic inheritor of Neal Adams: despite occasional issues with anatomy and perspective, his art was dynamic, sexy and often hit the bullseye. ONeils farewell story captures the hippie flavour of the early 70s Green Lantern stories by foregrounding Green Lanterns reading of Walden by Thoreau, while Grell provides some nice layouts (and a tribute to the 1969 Mercury Cougar), but anatomy issues make one cringe from time to time (especially in comparison to Reis and Mahnke).

Legacy, a story featuring Kyle Rayner, the fourth human to be given a Green Lantern power ring, is a solid, bit run-of-the-mill story with a teamwork message. The script by Ron Marz reminds Green Lantern fans of Kyle Rayners pivotal role in upholding justice when the Green Lantern Corps temporarily disbanded, and Darryl Banks art is capable, with dynamic lay-outs, but with some stiffness in characters bodies and faces. The teamwork message is undercut by the fact that Rayner wills his ring to duplicate the other human Green Lanterns to help him overcome his foe. While this is revealing of Rayners thoughts on teamwork, there is, in fact, no real teamwork, so the story falters on that level.

Heart of the Corps is a story that features the rough-housing, wise-cracking Guy Gardner the third human to receive a power ring and a Green Lantern Corps favourite, Kilowog. This Peter J. Tomasi tale is a classic DC birthday surprise story, with the kicker being that after Guy Gardner has led the morose Kilowog through some Dionysian fighting Kilowogs birthday is the same day that his planet was destroyed. The cheesiness of a birthday story is overcome by the magnitude of the gesture and its healing intention, and Fernando Pasarins art is cosmic and impressive.

Of all the Lanterns, John Stewart the black Green Lantern created by Denny ONeil as a corrective to the whites-only DC world up until the late 60s gets the shortest shrift by being featured (alongside Hawk Girl) in a story by hip comic creators Charlotte (Fullerton) McDuffie and Chriscross. The stylized retro-kind of art seems very cool at first glance, but the story is also retro to the 10 year-old-aimed, wooden story-telling of the early 60s. Sparse, corny and stilted dialogue mars the story, as does an artistic lapse at the climax where the reader doesnt really get what is happening. The least impressive story of the collection.

The next story, Four is one of the most powerful of the collection as it flash-forwards to Hal Jordan, John Stewart and Kyle Rayner meeting up as old men to joke and reminisce, especially about Guy Gardner and his self-sacrificing style of heroism. Dialogue between the ex-Lanterns and the waitress make the reader think that Guy Gardner is simply late, like every year, but the final panel has the three gathered before Gardners tombstone. It is a nice homage to the Guy Gardner character, written by Robert Venditti, and Rafa Sandovals art varies between impressive and basic.

The next story features the sixth human Green Lantern, Jessica Cruz. The story begins with Cruz battling an anxiety attack, thus addressing a real concern of modern life. Cruz reveals the horrific origin of her anxiety and as befitting the great tradition of the Green Lanterns she is able to call on her willpower to overcome her anxiety and her monstrous foe. She helps, and is helped by, her partner Green Lantern, the fifth human with a power ring, Simon Baz. Writer Mariko Tamaki does a fine job humanizing the cosmic willpower theme at the core of Green Lantern stories, while artist Mirka Andolfo shines in depicting Cruz as both athletic and waif-like.

Green Lantern (Hal Jordan) by Ivan Reis 2020 DC Comics (used for review purposes only)

The final story, Homegrown Hero, features the afore-mentioned Simon Baz. This Muslim characters very existence shows DC addressing the social reality of American (and North American) life, and writer Sina Grace makes sure we see him interacting with with his hijab-wearing aunt and sister in the normalcy of day-to-day life. DC walks an interesting line with this character as he is frequently partnered with Jessica Cruz, whose skin-tight Lantern garb expresses the inherent sexiness of costumed female super-heroes (which aesthetic has for decades now been worn by women throughout the western world). That Baz can accept and co-exist with both liberal western and orthodox Muslim social conventions is a positive signal that DC is emitting with this character. Ramon Villalobos art is capable and has a bit of a European-Heavy Metal feel and it brings across the seediness of the terrorist attempts by white supremacists to shoot up a Muslim art exhibit and a mosque. Baz speech to one of the terrorists is reminiscent of the game-changing speech of the black man in the early 70s Green Lantern cited above: This ring is a lot like my faith. I fight for compassion. It doesnt make me the judge thats HIS job. Being a Lantern, a Muslim its about oneness.

Just as the pulps before them, comics embody an important social function. Just as Robert E. Howards characters and stories pushed against societal norms whether it was Solomon Kane allying himself with an African shaman, or Conan accepting the authority of the female pirate captain Blit we see that same socially-progressive agenda in the Green Lantern comics. Each of the stories in this Green Lantern: 80th Anniversary special carries this tradition forward. The highlighting of willpower in the concept behind the Green Lantern characters is a message about how human will can make change for the better. In a world where nature is being destroyed at a catastrophic rate due to human will, it will take an enormous act of willpower to change course and protect the planet instead of destroying it.

Finally, this collection has something for everyone. For the Green Lantern newbie, this is a perfect introduction to the universe of characters and stories that have emerged from the 80 year tradition of Green Lantern. For the current up-to-date reader, this is a celebration of all that is Lantern in comics today. And for the older reader who grew up with Green Lantern in the 60s, 70s and 80s, it is a wonderful refresher on what has gone before and where the concept is going today.

1In street scenes in Gotham City, Metropolis or Central City all the citizens were depicted as white; in other words, black Americans simply did not exist in the DC comics world.

2Green Lantern is a misleading term, as there are 7,500 Green Lanterns in the universe and no less than six on Earth!

Related

Read more from the original source:
The Power and the Glory of Comics A Review of "Green Lantern: 80th Anniversary" | A Comics Column - Nation Valley News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

How AI is bringing the dark matter of nutrition to light, unlocking the power of plants – The European Sting

(Credit: Unsplash)

This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration ofThe European Stingwith theWorld Economic Forum.

Author: Jim Flatt, CEO & Co-founder, Brightseed

The COVID-19 pandemic didnt just transform how we work and communicate. It also accelerated the need for more proactive health measures for chronic health problems tied to diet. Such problems have emerged as a top risk factor for coronavirus and people with poor metabolic health accounted for half of COVID-19 hospitalizations in some regions around the world. The resulting high numbers led the authors of a report in The Lancet to issue a call for more resources to tackle metabolic health to avoid needless deaths.

Thankfully, new tools have been developed to offer comprehensive understanding of nutrition. This expertise and technology wont just help us tackle metabolic health it could help us finally fully realize the power of plants to improve health and wellness outcomes.

coronavirus, health, COVID19, pandemic

The first global pandemic in more than 100 years, COVID-19 has spread throughout the world at an unprecedented speed. At the time of writing, 4.5 million cases have been confirmed and more than 300,000 people have died due to the virus.

As countries seek to recover, some of the more long-term economic, business, environmental, societal and technological challenges and opportunities are just beginning to become visible.

To help all stakeholders communities, governments, businesses and individuals understand the emerging risks and follow-on effects generated by the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Marsh and McLennan and Zurich Insurance Group, has launched its COVID-19 Risks Outlook: A Preliminary Mapping and its Implications a companion for decision-makers, building on the Forums annual Global Risks Report.

Companies are invited to join the Forums work to help manage the identified emerging risks of COVID-19 across industries to shape a better future. Read the full COVID-19 Risks Outlook: A Preliminary Mapping and its Implications report here, and our impact story with further information.

We know that plants are critical for health, but do not fully understand why. Humans have not mapped the breadth of what plants offer, nor have we pinpointed the specific biological mechanisms of action triggered in our bodies when we eat them. This knowledge gap exists at the molecular level, with a need to understand how phytonutrients tiny plant molecules with anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and neuroprotective properties work in our bodies. In fact, the scientific community refers to the vast world of phytonutrients as the dark matter of nutrition because less than 1% of these molecules have been catalogued to date. The opportunity to learn more about phytonutrients and further tangibly connect their impact to health is massive.

Technologies, such as Artificial Intelligence, are helping researchers learn more about the biological connections between plants and humans. For instance, Brightseed has created a powerful artificial intelligence called Forager, which coupled with advanced metabolomics instrumentation, systematically identifies unknown plant compounds and predicts their likely roles in human health. Thus far, the technology has predicted beneficial phytonutrients for many important health conditions.

Recently, in collaboration with leading biomedical researchers, Brightseed discovered a powerful phytonutrient with the potential to improve metabolic health. This phytonutrient helps restore proper function of a central metabolic regulator, including maintaining healthy lipid and sugar levels in the bloodstream and key organs such as the liver, whose function is impaired by a poor diet. Brightseed will start clinical studies on this phytonutrient before the end of this year.

The impact of this discovery could be wide reaching and have profound implications for more than two billion people worldwide at elevated risk of chronic metabolic diseases. Elevated levels of fat in the liver (which are directly caused by chronic overeating) afflict between 25% and 30% of the global population. These individuals with fatty liver disease are 57% more likely to die prematurely and much more like to develop other debilitating metabolic diseases, including diabetes. The discovery of this phytonutrient is a glimpse into the positive change deeper nutritional understanding could bring.

Just as 1918 pandemic led to creation of the modern medicine industry, we now are at a similar tipping point with nutrition, on the precipice of developing a much more complete understanding of how plants are connected to human health.

The first step is improving our foundational knowledge. In the U.S., there is a broad-based effort among leading academic, non-profit and industry stakeholders to create a National Institute of Nutrition (NIN) to accelerate nutrition science and uncover the role of human nutrition in improving public health and reducing disease. The NIN, similar to institutes that exist in other countries, can support and incentivize higher-quality, more rigorous nutrition research at the molecular level. This research will provide a stronger foundation for nutrition recommendations and guidelines, which is essential to developing consensus in both the scientific and consumer communities.

The second step is a mindset shift. Modern food and agricultural systems have largely focused on and solved the problem of food insufficiency. However, preventable diet-driven chronic diseases have emerged instead. We need to pivot from merely increasing the supply of food to leveraging technologies that can help improve the nutritional quality of what we consume.

We need to pivot from merely increasing the supply of food to leveraging technologies that can help improve the nutritional quality of what we consume.

Jim Flatt, Brightseed

Healthier food options can be the center of a new proactive health industry and provide the food industry the opportunity to make important contributions to health and longevity, while benefiting economically from the capture of existing healthcare investment that currently is directed to treating chronic disease. Our current treatment-focused healthcare system is increasingly unaffordable and poorly suited to addressing the needs of individuals at heightened risk of developing chronic diseases that are largely preventable through lifestyle modifications, especially those related to diet.

No changes will be possible without forging new collaborations between public and private entities. Through cooperation we can develop more nutritious options and greatly influence policy change. Partnerships are also how well create a more nourished world and maximize our impact.

For the first time, we have the tools to explore the plant kingdom at the molecular level and answer questions such as How does what we eat really affect us? or How can food become medicine?

Technology is exponentially improving our understanding of how plants are connected to health. Together, we can goal shift the healthcare model from one squarely focused on treatment of disease to one that promotes health and natural resilience.

See the rest here:
How AI is bringing the dark matter of nutrition to light, unlocking the power of plants - The European Sting

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Your Pension May Be Gambling On Human Life, Profiting From COVID Deaths – Forbes

Your pension may gambling on highly-controversial life settlement funds which profit when people die ... [+] prematurely from COVID.

Whether you know it or not, your pension may be gambling on highly-speculative life settlement funds which profit when people die prematurely from COVID. Life settlement funds are controversial for a host of obvious and not-so-obvious reasons. These investments in a pension ensuring the retirement security of workers is doubly problematic.

Many public and private pensions are gambling on highly speculative funds that invest in so-called longevity-contingent assets, such as life insurance policies insuring the lives of individuals who are generally at least 70 years old. The insured individual must have a life expectancy ranging from, say, not less than two years to not more than 15 years. A given fund may have exposure to hundreds of lives in the portfolio with an average insured age of over 80 years old.

The sooner the terminally ill and other elderly insured individuals die, the betteras far as your pension is concerned.

With more than 80% of COVID deaths in the United States occurring in people aged 65 and older, this should be the best of times for gambling on these controversial funds which often promise annualized returns ranging from 8-12%. (Actual net returns are likely to be less than half those promised.)

If so, would it comfort you to know your pension was profiting from the misery of others?

Do you know whether your pension invests in life settlements? Have any such investments been clearly disclosed to you? Do the people managing your pension even know?

Believe it or not, they may not.

Today many alternative investment funds provide that they may withhold disclosure of underlying investments from pensions and participants, including stinky stuff like payday loans and life settlements.

Life settlement funds are controversial for a host of obvious and not-so-obvious reasons. Gambling on these highly speculative investments in a pension ensuring the retirement security of workers is doubly problematic.

Many regulators, lawmakers and other governmental authorities, as well as many insurance companies and insurance industry organizations, oppose the selling and buying of longevity-contingent assets. The industry and some of its participants have long been in legal and regulatory hot water. Opponents of the industry argue that these life insurance transactions are contrary to public policy by promoting financial speculation on human life and all-too-often involve elements of fraud and other wrongdoing.

Ask yourself: Why would an elderly, sickly or terminally ill insured person sell his or her life insurance policy? Because he or she needs cash to cover rising medical costs and living expenses? What are the chances the sale of that individuals life insurance policy may have been coerced or induced by fraud? Its no surprise that thoughtful regulators and lawmakers would be highly concerned.

The limited regulatory oversight of these funds is another major red flag. Many funds take the position that whole life settlements do not constitute securities under the federal securities laws and do not register as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940. Compliance with other federal and state securities laws is also a concern. The SEC has long had difficulty reigning in industry abuses since unless securities are involved the agency generally lacks jurisdiction.

Worst of all, since the portfolio investments of these funds do not currently have a readily available market for valuation purposes, the likelihood that portfolio values, as well as investment returns may be inflated by the managers is high. This is particularly troublesome for open-ended investment funds, where new investors may be buying into a fund at an already inflated Net Asset Value (NAV). The life settlement asset class has had a troubled past with respect to inflated NAVs caused by funds underestimating life expectancies.

In other words, fund managers, are so hopeful that the old and sick insureds will die sooner rather than later, they assume the life expectancies will be shorter.

In Europe, a number of open-end funds (so-called sickened death bond funds) have gated, trapping investors. After waiting several years for the funds to liquidate, investors have recovered only pennies on the dollar.

In my opinion, additional regulatory action regarding overvaluations of the portfolios of these funds is almost certainly coming. If so, your pensionyour retirement securitymay be at risk.

In 2016, the Office of the Virgin Islands Inspector Generalissued a scathing report finding that the Virgin Islands General Employees Retirement System had entered into an extremely risky and questionable life settlement investment that jeopardized about $42 million of its investment portfolio. This was done without performing the necessary due diligence and obtaining the necessary expert advice, before exposing the pension fund to this high-risk investment. As a result, GERS has already written-off 20% or $8.4 million of the remaining value. In addition, GERS also granted a $10 million line of credit to the same partnership that is handling the viatical. The majority of the proceeds were to pay past due and near term premiums for the policies.

An advisor to the pension noted, There is uncertainty on the use of viaticals as an investment by a defined benefit plan. Also, The nature of the investment in viaticals, that is an investment seeking profits off death, raises issues of social responsibility.

To be sure, in my opinion, life settlement funds are the antithesis of socially responsible investing.

Should your retirement savings be in longevity-contingent assets supporting speculation on human life which often involve elements of fraud and other wrongdoing? First find out whether your pension is invested in these funds, then let your voice be heard.

Continued here:
Your Pension May Be Gambling On Human Life, Profiting From COVID Deaths - Forbes

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

In COVID-19 Crisis, Older Americans Are More Resilient Than Younger Generations, Edward Jones and Age Wave Research Finds – Webster County Citizen

ST. LOUIS, Aug. 4, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --Despite COVID-19's severe and disproportionate impact on the health of aging adults, older Americans reported they are coping far better than younger ones, according to the Edward Jones and Age Wave study released today, "The Four Pillars of the New Retirement." The9,000-person, five-generation study in the U.S. and Canada revealed that in the U.S. 37% of Gen Z and 27% of millennials said they have suffered mental health declines since the pandemic began, while only 15% of baby boomers and 8% of silent generation respondents said the same.

"COVID-19's impact forever changed the reality of many Americans, yet we've observed a resilience among U.S. retirees in contrast to younger generations," said Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., psychologist/gerontologist and founder and CEO of Age Wave. "Older Americans tend to recognize the value of a long-term view, and so as they think about their lives, longevity and legacy, they're able to pull from an array of experiences that help them weather current storms, feel gratitude about many aspects of their lives and still plan for the future."

The landmark Edward Jones and Age Wave research uncovered a new definition for retirement, as far more than simply the end of work. The majority of U.S. retirees (55%) defined retirement as a whole new chapter filled with new choices, freedoms and challenges, and they do so in a more holistic way across four important areas of health, family, purpose and finance.

COVID-19's Impact on Family Closeness and Finances COVID-19's initial dramatic impact on the U.S. economy and personal financial situations may very well leave long-lasting implications. Reflecting a great deal of generational generosity, 24 million Americans* have provided financial support to adult children due to COVID-19, and an overwhelming 71% of retirees said they would offer financial support to their family even if it could jeopardize their own financial future. Despite COVID-19's negative impact on finances, 67% of Americans said the pandemic has brought their families closer together. The research also revealed that 20 million Americans stopped making retirement savings contributions during the COVID-19 pandemic and only a quarter of working Americans were on track with their retirement savings prior to the pandemic.[i]

"We've certainly seen COVID-19's disruptive force on finances, with the pandemic influencing retirement timing and financial confidence," said Ken Cella, Edward Jones Client Services Group Principal. "However, this cloud has brought several silver linings in terms of family closeness and important discussions about planning earlier for retirement, saving more for emergencies and even talking through end-of-life plans and long-term care costs."

Social Relationships as Predictor of Health and Purpose While loneliness is pervasive across all five generations, as people age, physical isolation becomes a greater health risk, as deadly as smoking a pack of cigarettes a day[ii], and it is linked to increased risk for heart disease and dementia.[iii]While most retirees (76%) said they derive the greatest sense of purpose from social relationships, specifically time spent with loved ones, 72% noted that one of their biggest fears is becoming a burden on their families.

"Retirees say they miss people and purpose, not paychecks, when they retire, but 31% of new retirees are struggling to find purpose in this stage of life. They want to feel useful, not just youthful, and keep learning and growing at every age," Dychtwald added.

The study found that 89% of all Americans feel that there should be more ways for retirees to use their talents and knowledge for the benefit of their communities and society at large.

Financial Advisors as Connectors and Confidence Builders As Americans redefine retirement in a broader way across the four pillars, the majority of U.S. respondents felt their ideal financial advisor is a guide who can understand them and help them achieve their goals. In fact, 84% of those working with a financial advisor said that their financial advisor relationship gave them a greater sense of comfort regarding their finances during the pandemic.

Further underscoring the fundamental importance of financial security, retirees are often met by new challenges as they enter retirement. Thirty-six percent of retirees said managing money in retirement is more confusing than saving for retirement, and they want help navigating. Fifty-two percent of retirees cited healthcare costs, including long-term care, as the most common financial worry. This concern was also echoed by pre-retirees as more than two-thirds (68%) of those who plan to retire in the next 10 years said they have no idea what their healthcare and long-term care costs will be in retirement.

"Beyond finances, we can help our clients envision and truly realize a holistic retirement, which, we know includes decisions about their health, family and purpose," said Cella. "Empathy and knowledge allow us to better serve our clients in a human-centered way and work together to achieve what's most important to them and their families."

While the above findings feature a selection of respondents' thoughts regarding the new definition of retirement, further examination of the four pillars of health, family, purpose and finances reveal their highly intertwined nature and influence in shaping retirees' overall quality of life. For more details from The Four Pillars of the New Retirement, please visit http://www.EdwardJones.com/NewRetirement.

MethodologyThis report is based on a large-scale investigation of what it means to live well in retirement that began in November 2019. The study was conducted by Edward Jones in partnership with Age Wave and The Harris Poll.

As part of the study, The Harris Poll conducted an online, representative survey from May 21 through June 4, 2020among more than 9,000 adults age 18+, in the US and Canada, including n=3,000 among a US general population, n=1,000 among a Canadian general population, and oversamples of approximately 500 in each of the following 10 metropolitan regions: Atlanta, Charlotte, Cleveland, Dallas, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Portland, Raleigh-Durham, St. Louis, and Toronto.Results were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population.

*Estimated projections to the US population are calculated based on the 2019 Census Current Population Survey.

About Edward Jones Edward D. Jones & Co., L.P., a Fortune 500 company headquartered in St. Louis, provides financial services in the U.S. and, through its affiliate, in Canada. Every aspect of the firm's business, from the investments offered to the location of branch offices, caters to individual investors. The firm's 19,000-plus financial advisors serve more than 7 million clients with a total of $1.2 trillion in client assets under care. Visit http://www.edwardjones.comor the recruiting website at http://www.careers.edwardjones.com. Member SIPC.

About Age Wave Under the leadership of Founder and CEO Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., Age Wave is the nation's foremost thought leader on population aging and its profound business, social, financial, health care, workforce, and cultural implications. Dychtwald's long-awaited new book What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life's Third Age was just published (Wiley, July 15,2020). Since its inception in 1986, the firm has advised numerous non-profits and over half the Fortune 500. For more information, please visitwww.agewave.com.

About The Harris Poll The Harris Poll is one of the longest-running surveys in the U.S.;tracking public opinion, motivations and social sentiment since 1963. The Harris Poll is now part of Harris Insights & Analytics, a global consulting and market research firm that delivers social intelligence for transformational times. The Harris Poll works with clients in three primary areas; building twenty-first-century corporate reputation, crafting brand strategy and performance tracking, and earning organic media through public relations research. Learn more atwww.theharrispoll.com

[i]Federal Reserve, Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2018 - May 2019

[ii]Holt-Lunstad J, Smith TB, Layton JB. Social relationships and mortality risk: a meta-analytic review. PLoS Med., July 2010

[iii]National Institute on Aging, "Social isolation, loneliness in older people pose health risks," April 23, 2019.

Read the original post:
In COVID-19 Crisis, Older Americans Are More Resilient Than Younger Generations, Edward Jones and Age Wave Research Finds - Webster County Citizen

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

In COVID-19 Crisis, Older Canadians Are More Resilient than Younger Generations, Edward Jones and Age Wave Research Finds – Canada NewsWire

The landmark five-generation study examines how the pandemic has transformed and impacted the outlook for retirement in Canada across key areas including health, family, purpose and finances.

MISSISSAUGA, ON, Aug. 4, 2020 /CNW/ - Today Edward Jones, in partnership with Age Wave, released a landmark study that takes a comprehensive look at retirement in Canada, focusing specifically on four central pillars: health, family, purpose and finances. The study examines trends affecting the rapid transformation of retirement in Canada as the country's aging population approaches this new stage of life. This includes the impact of COVID-19 which has accelerated many of the trends unearthed in this study.

Despite COVID-19's severe and disproportionate impact on the health of aging adults, older Canadians reported they are coping far better than younger ones. "The Four Pillars of the New Retirement" study of 1,000 Canadian respondents across five-generations revealed that 38 per cent of Gen Z and 36 per cent of millennials said they have suffered mental health declines since the pandemic began, while only 20 per cent of baby boomers and 7 per cent of silent generation respondents said the same. The majority of Canadian retirees (51 per cent) defined retirement as a whole new chapter filled with new choices, freedoms and challenges, and they do so in a more holistic way across four important areas of health, family, purpose and finance.

"We've certainly seen COVID-19's disruptive influence on finances, with the pandemic impacting retirement timing and financial confidence," said David Gunn, Country Leader, Edward Jones Canada. "However, the pandemic has brought families closer and renewed the focus on important discussions about planning earlier for retirement, saving more for emergencies and even talking through end-of-life plans and long-term care costs."

"COVID-19's impact forever changed the reality of many Canadians, yet we've observed a resilience among Canadian retirees in contrast to younger generations," said Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., psychologist/gerontologist and founder and CEO of Age Wave. "Older Canadians recognize the value of a long-term view, and so as they think about their lives, longevity and legacy, they're able to pull from an array of experiences that help them weather current storms, feel gratitude about many aspects of their lives and still plan for the future."

The four pillars to living well in the "new retirement"

The study goes beyond the impacts of COVID-19 and outlines what makes today's retirement "new". Canada's retirement landscape is unique - increasing longevity and a groundswell of Boomers entering retirement make this one of the most significant societal shifts in history. The study found, changing attitudes and aspirations coupled with external forces (i.e. economic downturns, the pandemic, technology, etc.) have drastically changed the expectations of those approaching or entering retirement and will shape what retirement looks like for generations to come.

The study identified four key pillars for living well in the "new retirement":

Health When it comes to living well in retirement, 97 per cent of retirees and 99 per cent of those age 75 and over, say that health is more important than wealth. 91 per cent of Canadian retirees say it's never too late to improve health, however, there is an intention/action gap as 51 per cent of Canadian retirees don't exercise regularly, and 33 per cent say they don't maintain a healthy diet. While physical health usually declines with age, for many Canadians mental health rises.

Family A bright spot coming out of the pandemic is the deepening of family ties. Two-thirds of Gen Z define family as "anyone they love and care for, regardless of whether they are related by blood, marriage or adoption." They believe in "families of affinity" or families of choice. As we approach what is expected to be the largest generational wealth transfer in recent memory, retirees cite they worry about their children more (44 per cent) and are willing to do whatever it takes, personally and financially, to support family members in need, even if it means sacrificing their own financial security (63 per cent). The study also found, 47 per cent of Canadians overall and 30 per cent of Canadians age 65 and over have yet to begin discussing their end-of-life care preferences with their family or close friends.

Purpose Retirees with a strong sense of purpose are happier, healthier and live longer, according to the study. This cohort reports they find their strongest sense of purpose from spending time with loved ones (72 per cent) and many (46 per cent) find purpose by being generous or helping others, particularly women (54 per cent). They are also looking for meaningful ways to carve out their free time. They don't just want to keep busy; they want to make useful and rewarding contributions to community and family. As the country's population continues to age, 89 per cent of Canadians agree that there should be more ways for retirees to help in their communities.

FinancesAccording to the study, a chief financial goal amongst retirees, is to have enough resources to provide security (48 per cent) and the freedom to live the lives they want (47 per cent). Retirees' greatest financial worry is not economic uncertainty like recessions, inflation or taxes, despite the disruption associated with COVID-19. Their greatest concerns are encountering unexpected expenses (54 per cent) and the cost of health care, including long-term care (47 per cent). Pre-retirees express even higher concerns about health and long-term care (59 per cent) with three quarters of those who plan to retire (74 per cent) stating they have no idea what their health and long-term care costs may be in retirement.

"Beyond finances, we can help our clients envision and truly realize a holistic and fulfilling retirement, which, we know includes decisions about their health, family and purpose," said Gunn. "Empathy and knowledge allow us to better serve as a trusted advisor to our clients in a human-centered way and work together to achieve what's most important to Canadians and their families."

While the above findings feature a selection of data regarding the new definition of retirement, further examination of the four pillars of health, family, purpose and finances reveal their highly intertwined nature and influence in shaping retirees' overall quality of life. For the complete study, please visit http://www.edwardjones.ca/newretirement.

MethodologyThis report is based on a large-scale investigation of what it means to live well in retirement that began in November 2019. The study was conducted by Edward Jones in partnership with Age Wave and The Harris Poll. As part of the study, The Harris Poll conducted an online, representative survey from May 21 through June 4, 2020,among more than 9,000 adults age 18+ in the U.S. and Canada, n=1,000 among a Canadian general population and an oversampling of n=500 in Toronto.

About Edward Jones Canada Edward Jones is a full-service investment dealer with more than 850 financial advisors in Canadian communities from coast-to-coast. A member of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada and the Canadian Investor Protection Fund, the firm is also a participating organization in the Toronto Stock Exchange. Edward Jones has been ranked #1 for eight consecutive years in the J.D. Power Canada Full-Service Investor Satisfaction Study (2013-2020). For more information, visit edwardjones.ca.

Edward Jones received the highest score in the J.D. Power 2013-2020 Canada Full-Service Investor Satisfaction Studies of investors' satisfaction with their full-service investment firm. Visit jdpower.com/awards.

About Age WaveUnder the leadership of Founder and CEO Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., Age Wave is the North America's foremost thought leader on population aging and its profound business, social, financial, health care, workforce, and cultural implications. Dychtwald's long-awaited new book What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life's Third Age was just published (Wiley, July 15, 2020). Since its inception in 1986, the firm has advised numerous non-profits and over half the Fortune 500. For more information, please visitwww.agewave.com.

About The Harris PollThe Harris Poll has been tracking public opinion, motivations and social sentiment since 1963 and is now part of Harris Insights & Analytics, a global consulting and market research firm that delivers social intelligence for transformational times. The Harris Poll works with clients in three primary areas; building twenty-first-century corporate reputation, crafting brand strategy and performance tracking, and earning organic media through public relations research. Learn more atwww.theharrispoll.com@HarrisPoll

SOURCE Edward Jones

For further information: Nisha Mohan, Edward Jones, [emailprotected], (647) 212-6699; Tom Horn, Proof Strategies, [emailprotected], (416) 969-2781

Follow this link:
In COVID-19 Crisis, Older Canadians Are More Resilient than Younger Generations, Edward Jones and Age Wave Research Finds - Canada NewsWire

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Sustainability and Covid-19 accomodations can co-exist in hospitality industry, by Jane Bokunewicz – Press of Atlantic City

While hospitality organizations have taken steps to slow the spread of coronavirus, in terms of green initiatives, they may have taken a few steps back.

In 2019, a World Wide Fund for Nature study estimated that by the year 2030, plastic pollution would nearly double. By and by, more restaurant operators and food establishments began finding sustainable solutions to reverse this trend. The casual chain Just Salad introduced a $1 reusable plastic bowl to its customers, saving an estimated 75,000 pounds of plastic waste per year. Starbucks and Dunkin Donuts offered low-cost reusable cups. Supermarkets strongly encouraged and in some instances, required reusable shopping bags at checkout. These innovative methods to reduce plastic usage would soon be placed on an indefinite hold in an effort to follow CDC guidelines for COVID-19 and minimize tactile transmission between staff and customers.

In the wake of COVID-19 and the shutdown to follow, local restaurants faced an evident catch-22 contradiction when it comes to reducing trash, plastic and non-recyclables: take-out. As restaurants began to experience major losses in revenue, take-out and delivery deemed permissible by most states seemed to be the only way these establishments could keep their doors open. Customers were happy to provide support and longevity to their local businesses.

However, take-out typically requires single-use packaging and excessive plastic consumption, which poses an environmental concern. A Press of Atlantic City article on July 30 reported a significant increase in litter on the beaches and boardwalks due in part to an increase in outdoor dining and take out orders.

Unfortunately, food and beverage is not the only hospitality sector to have to scale back green initiatives. Pre-pandemic, hotels including Marriott, Hilton and Intercontinental began replacing mini-shampoos and conditioners with bulk pump-top dispenser units in an effort to reduce plastic waste. In todays reality, the pump-top while environmentally conscious could result in guests feeling hesitant to touch something previously used by other guests.

At the present moment, slowing the spread of COVID-19 and saving as many human lives as possible is of higher priority than negative environmental impact. However, whos to say that the two cannot work in tandem? Do customers need the plastic utensils provided for takeout if they are just taking the food home to eat? Just offering a no-utensil option could both reduce waste and save money.

COVID-19 has encouraged the eco-friendly innovation known as contactless technology. McGettigans 19th Hole in Galloway, for example, has a QSR code on each dining table that customers can scan with their smart phone and be directed almost instantly to an online menu, eliminating the risk of contracting the virus via physical menus and reducing the need for disposable paper or plastic-coated menus. Sirens Bar & Grill in Atlantic City has taken QSR coding a step further: once the customer scans the code, they are able to place orders directly from their smart phone, enter their table number, and wait patiently for their food to arrive. Customers can pay the bill and tip from their phones as well, entirely eliminating touch, and paper, from the process.

Without a doubt, the ingenuity on the part of restaurant, hotel and casino operators in adapting to this new normal of COVID-19 precuations has been nothing short of commendable. As operators continue to innovate and rethink previous business models, it is also especially important to keep an eye on sustainability finding ways to both slow the spread and minimize unnecessary waste.

Jane Bokunewicz, of Galloway Township, is coordinator of the Lloyd D. Levenson Institute for Gaming, Hospitality and Tourism, and an associate professor of hospitality and tourism management studies at Stockton University,

Go here to see the original:
Sustainability and Covid-19 accomodations can co-exist in hospitality industry, by Jane Bokunewicz - Press of Atlantic City

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson


Page 21234..1020..»