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Category : Nanomedicine

Precision NanoSystems to Host Nanomedicines Symposium – Technology Networks

Join Precision NanoSystems for its second annual nanomedicines symposium, entitled Nanomedicines: enabling new therapeutic modalities, on the 15th of July in Boston, MA. Following the success of last years inaugural event, the symposium will bring together distinguished researchers and drug developers from across the nanomedicines industry, and will precede the Controlled Release Societys Annual Meeting and Exposition from the 16th to 18th of July.

The symposium schedule has been designed to provide an overview of the latest developments in nanomedicine research, including strategies for overcoming in vitro and in vivo barriers to effective and targeted drug delivery. It will cover a diverse range of applications, with the keynote address To target or not to target: lessons from RNAi-based targeted lipid nanoparticles being provided by Professor Dan Peer from the Department of Cell Research and Immunology at Tel Aviv University. Other topics covered during the symposium will explore cutting-edge research in the fields of gene therapy, genetic vaccines and small molecule delivery. This will include industry talks from GSK, CureVac and Genentech, as well as presentations from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, the University of British Columbia and Houston Methodist/Weill Cornell Medical College.

The symposium will also give attendees a chance to explore the latest enabling technologies in the nanomedicines sector with presentations from Precision NanoSystems and event sponsors Spectradyne, SpectrumLabs, Malvern Instruments and Sigma-Aldrich as well as providing networking opportunities throughout the day.

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Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumors – Phys.Org

Killer T cells surround a cancer cell. Credit: NIH

Early phase Northwestern Medicine research has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.

The strategy involves using lipid polymer based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs).

"BTICs are malignant brain tumor populations that underlie the therapy resistance, recurrence and unstoppable invasion commonly encountered by glioblastoma patients after the standard treatment regimen of surgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy," explained the study's first author, Dr. Dou Yu, research assistant professor of neurological surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using mouse models of brain tumors implanted with BTICs derived from human patients, the scientists injected nanoparticles containing small interfering RNA (siRNA)short sequences of RNA molecules that reduce the expression of specific cancer promoting proteinsdirectly into the tumor. In the new study, the strategy stopped tumor growth and extended survival when the therapy was administered continuously through an implanted drug infusion pump.

"This major progress, although still at a conceptual stage, underscores a new direction in the pursuit of a cure for one of the most devastating medical conditions known to mankind," said Yu, who collaborated on the research with principal investigator Dr. Maciej Lesniak, Michael J. Marchese Professor of Neurosurgery and chair of neurological surgery.

Glioblastoma is particularly difficult to treat because its genetic makeup varies from patient to patient. This new therapeutic approach would make it possible to deliver siRNAs to target multiple cancer-causing gene products simultaneously in a particular patient's tumor.

In this study, the scientists tested siRNAs that target four transcription factors highly expressed in many glioblastoma tissuesbut not all. The therapy worked against classes of glioblastoma BTICs with high levels of those transcription factors, while other classes of the cancer did not respond.

"This paints a picture for personalized glioblastoma therapy regimens based on tumor profiling," Yu said. "Customized nanomedicine could target the unique genetic signatures in any specific patient and potentially lead to greater therapeutic benefits."

The strategy could also apply to other medical conditions related to the central nervous systemnot just brain tumors.

"Degenerative neurological diseases or even psychiatric conditions could potentially be the therapeutic candidates for this multiplexed delivery platform," Yu said.

Before scientists can translate this proof-of-concept research to humans, they will need to continue refining the nanomedicine platform and evaluating its long-term safety. Still, the findings from this new research provide insight for further investigation.

"Nanomedicine provides a unique opportunity to advance a therapeutic strategy for a disease without a cure. By effectively targeting brain tumor initiating stem cells responsible for cancer recurrence, this approach opens up novel translational approaches to malignant brain cancer," Lesniak summed up.

Explore further: Cold virus, stem cells tested to destroy deadly brain cancer

More information: Dou Yu et al, Multiplexed RNAi therapy against brain tumor-initiating cells via lipopolymeric nanoparticle infusion delays glioblastoma progression, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701911114

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Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumors - Phys.Org

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Nanobiotix Revenues for the 2nd Quarter of 2017 – Markets Insider

Regulatory News:

NANOBIOTIX (Paris:NANO) (Euronext: NANO ISIN: FR0011341205), a late clinical-stage nanomedicine company pioneering new approaches to the treatment of cancer, today announced its unaudited revenues for the second quarter of 2017.

Income statement

Activity and results

Total revenues for the second quarter amounts to 58,645, which is fully in line with the Companys expectations.

For this period, most of the revenues are generated from services that Nanobiotix crossed-charged to its partners as per its operational activities.

In May, Nanobiotix announced a first set of clinical data from its immuno-oncology (IO) program, showing the potential ability of NBTXR3 to transform "cold tumors into "hot tumors. The new clinical data and previous pre-clinical data indicate that NBTXR3 could play a key role in oncology and could become a backbone in immuno-oncology.

Nanobiotix presented the results of the Phase I/II head and neck cancer trial with its lead product candidate, NBTXR3, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), Chicago in June. The excellent safety profile demonstrated in this elderly and frail population so far indicates that NBTXR3 would represent a valuable option to preserve and improve patients Quality of Life compared to other treatments. This safety profile also opens up opportunities for combinations with different types of treatments. These encouraging results point towards a positive improvement of loco-regional Control, impacting Overall Survival of the patients.

Nanobiotix is filing a protocol amendment of this study to include 44 additional patients in an expansion to demonstrate the efficacy of NBTXR3. Nanobiotix is opening 12-15 additional sites in Europe to expand the development of this indication, and plans to expand this study in the US.

Finally, in mid-June, Nanobiotix presented new translational data at the "Immunotherapy workshop - Incorporating Radiation Oncology into Immunotherapy co-sponsored by the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Taken together, these non-clinical and preliminary clinical results confirm that NBTXR3 plus radiotherapy could efficiently prime an adaptive antitumor immune response, turning "cold tumors in "hot tumors. Additionally, these results suggest that the physically-induced response and subsequent immune activation triggered by the NBTXR3 treatment could be generic. NBTXR3 with radiotherapy could transform tumors into an effective in situ vaccine, opening up very promising perspectives in the treatment of local cancer and metastases.

-Ends-

Next financial press release: revenue for the first half of 2017 to be released on August 31, 2017.

About NANOBIOTIX: http://www.nanobiotix.com

Nanobiotix (Euronext: NANO / ISIN: FR0011341205) is a late clinical-stage nanomedicine company pioneering novel approaches for the treatment of cancer. The Companys first-in-class, proprietary technology, NanoXray, enhances radiotherapy energy with a view to provide a new, more efficient treatment for cancer patients.

NanoXray products are compatible with current radiotherapy treatments and are meant to treat potentially a wide variety of solid tumors including soft tissue sarcoma, head and neck cancers, liver cancers, prostate cancer, breast cancer, glioblastoma, etc., via multiple routes of administration.

NBTXR3 is being evaluated in: soft tissue sarcoma (STS), head and neck cancers, prostate cancer, and liver cancers (primary and metastases). Additionally, head and neck cancer and rectal cancer trials led by Nanobiotixs Taiwanese partner, PharmaEngine, are underway in the Asia Pacific region. The Company has filed in August 2016 for market approval (CE Marking) in Europe for its lead product NBTXR3.

The Company started in 2016 a new preclinical research program in Immuno-oncology with its lead product NBTXR3, which could have the potential to bring a new dimension to cancer immunotherapies.

Nanobiotix is listed on the regulated market of Euronext in Paris (ISIN: FR0011341205, Euronext ticker: NANO, Bloomberg: NANO: FP). The Company Headquarter is based in Paris, France. Affiliate in Cambridge, United States.

Disclaimer

This press release contains certain forward-looking statements concerning Nanobiotix and its business. Such forward-looking statements are based on assumptions that Nanobiotix considers to be reasonable. However, there can be no assurance that the estimates contained in such forward-looking statements will be verified, which estimates are subject to numerous risks including the risks set forth in the reference document of Nanobiotix filed with the French Financial Markets Authority (Autorit des Marchs Financiers) under number D.17-0470 on April 28, 2017 (a copy of which is available on http://www.nanobiotix.com) and to the development of economic conditions, financial markets and the markets in which Nanobiotix operates. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are also subject to risks not yet known to Nanobiotix or not currently considered material by Nanobiotix. The occurrence of all or part of such risks could cause actual results, financial conditions, performance or achievements of Nanobiotix to be materially different from such forward-looking statements.

This press release and the information that it contains do not constitute an offer to sell or subscribe for, or a solicitation of an offer to purchase or subscribe for, Nanobiotix shares in any country. At the moment NBTXR3 does not bear a CE mark and is not permitted to be placed on the market or put into service until NBTXR3 has obtained a CE mark.

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Nanobiotix Revenues for the 2nd Quarter of 2017 - Markets Insider

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Koch Institute’s Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine Brings Together Renowned Faculty to Combat Cancer – AZoNano

Written by AZoNanoJul 10 2017

The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT will soon be reaching the first anniversary of the launch of the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, founded through a generous gift from Kathy and Curt Marble 63.

The Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicines faculty is made up of Koch Institute members who are committed to fighting cancer with nanomedicine through research, education, and collaboration. Top row (l-r) Sangeeta Bhatia, director; Daniel Anderson; and Angela Belcher. Bottom row: Paula Hammond; Darrell Irvine; and Robert Langer. (Photo: Koch Institute Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine)

Bringing together leading Koch Institute faculty members and their teams, the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine focuses on huge challenges in cancer detection, treatment and monitoring that can profit from the latest physics and biology of the nanoscale.

These challenges include spotting cancer earlier than present techniques allow, harnessing the immune system to combat cancer even as it progresses, using therapeutic insights from cancer biology to design therapies for formerly undruggable targets, integrating current drugs for synergistic action, and developing tools for more accurate diagnosis and improved surgical intervention.

Koch Institute member Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. and Dorothy Wilson, Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, serves as the Inaugural Director of the center.

A major goal for research at the Marble Center is to leverage the collaborative culture at the Koch Institute to use nanotechnology to improve cancer diagnosis and care in patients around the world.

Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Koch Institute Member

Transforming nanomedicine

The Marble Center joins MITs larger efforts at the forefront of discovery and advancement to solve the critical global challenge that is cancer. The concept of convergence the combination of the life and physical sciences with engineering is a trademark of MIT, the founding principle of the Koch Institute, and at the heart of the Marble Centers mission.

The center galvanizes the MIT cancer research community in efforts to use nanomedicine as a translational platform for cancer care. Its transformative by applying these emerging technologies to push the boundaries of cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring and translational by promoting their development and application in the clinic.

Tyler Jacks, Director of the Koch Institute and a David H. Koch Professor of Biology

The centers faculty six renowned MIT Professors and Koch Institute Members are committed to combating cancer with nanomedicine through research, education and partnership. They are, Sangeeta Bhatia (director), the John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Daniel G. Anderson, the Samuel A. Goldblith Professor of Applied Biology in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science; Angela M. Belcher, the James Mason Crafts Professor in the departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering; Paula T. Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor of Engineering and head of the Department of Chemical Engineering; Darrell J. Irvine, Professor in the departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering; and Robert S. Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor.

Extending their partnership within the walls of the Institute, members of the Marble Center profit greatly from the support of the Peterson (1957) Nanotechnology Materials Core Facility in the Koch Institutes Robert A. Swanson (1969) Biotechnology Center. The Peterson Facilitys array of technological resources and know-how is unparalleled in the United States, and gives members of the center and of the Koch Institute, a distinctive advantage in the development and application of materials and technologies at the nanoscale.

Looking ahead

The Marble Center made the most of its first year, and has provided backing for advanced research projects including theranostic nanoparticles that can both detect and treat cancers, real-time imaging of interactions between cancer and immune cells to properly understand reaction to cancer immunotherapies, and delivery technologies for a number of powerful RNA-based therapeutics capable of engaging specific cancer targets with precision.

As part of its efforts to help adopt a multifaceted science and engineering research force, the center has offered fellowship support for trainees as well as valuable opportunities for scientific exchange, mentorship and professional development.

Promoting wider engagement, the Marble Center serves as a bridge to a broad network of nanomedicine resources, linking its members to MIT.nano, other Nanotechnology Researchers, and Clinical Partners across Boston and beyond. The center has also set up a scientific advisory board, whose members come from leading clinical and academic centers around the country, and will assist in shaping the centers future programs and continued development.

As the Marble Center enters another year of partnerships and innovation, there is a new landmark in sight for 2018. Nanomedicine has been chosen as the main theme for the Koch Institutes 17th Annual Cancer Research Symposium. The event is scheduled for June 15th, 2018, and will bring together national domain experts, providing a perfect forum for Marble Center members to share the discoveries and progresses made during its sophomore year.

Having next years KI Annual Symposium dedicated to nanomedicine will be a wonderful way to further expose the cancer research community to the power of doing science at the nanoscale. The interdisciplinary approach has the power to accelerate new ideas at this exciting interface of nanotechnology and medicine.

Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Koch Institute Member

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Global Nanomedicine Market 2017 GE Healthcare, Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Co. Inc. – Ask Reporter 24

The worldwide Nanomedicine Market report is an in-depth research on the current situation of the Nanomedicine industry. The research study of Global Nanomedicine Market 2017 offers a strategic assessment of Nanomedicine market. The industry report focuses on the growth opportunities, which will help the Nanomedicine industry to expand operations in the existing markets globally.

Firstly, Nanomedicine Market report introduces a basic overview of the Nanomedicine industry, which includes Nanomedicine definitions, applications, classifications and Nanomedicine industry chain structure. Worldwide Nanomedicine market analysis is provided for the international market including Nanomedicine industry competitive analysis, Nanomedicine market development history and major sectors development status on Nanomedicine industry scenario.

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Global Nanomedicine Market 2017: Competitive Landscape and Key Vendors

1 GE Healthcare 2 Johnson & Johnson 3 Mallinckrodt plc 4 Merck & Co. Inc. 5 Nanosphere Inc. 6 Pfizer Inc. 7 Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc. 8 Smith & Nephew PLC 9 Stryker Corp 10 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. 11 UCB (Union chimique belge)

Nanomedicine Market 2017: Type Segment Analysis

Regenerative Medicine In-vitro & In-vivo Diagnostics Vaccines Drug Delivery

Nanomedicine Market 2017: Applications Segment Analysis

Clinical Cardiology Urology Genetics Orthopedics Ophthalmology

The Nanomedicine market covers the geological regions including US, EU, China, and Japan. Other regions can also be added efficiently as per customers need. The report also displays the market size for each category during the forecasting period from 2017 to 2022.

Further, the report guides the client according to the various aspects of Nanomedicine industry like supply chain analysis, Nanomedicine industry rules, and policies, along with product cost, product images, the cost structure, import/export information and utilisation figures. The detailed competitive plan of Nanomedicine industry report will help the clients to systematically specify better business strategies for a desired business payoff.

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At the end, report Global Nanomedicine Market 2017 focuses the feasibility of new investment projects is assessed, and overall research conclusions are offered on Nanomedicine market scenario.

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Converging on cancer at the nanoscale – The MIT Tech

This summer, the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT marks the first anniversary of the launch of the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, established through a generous gift from Kathy and Curt Marble 63.

Bringing together leading Koch Institute faculty members and their teams, the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine focuses on grand challenges in cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring that can benefit from the emerging biology and physics of the nanoscale.

These challenges include detecting cancer earlier than existing methods allow, harnessing the immune system to fight cancer even as it evolves, using therapeutic insights from cancer biology to design therapies for previously undruggable targets, combining existing drugs for synergistic action, and creating tools for more accurate diagnosis and better surgical intervention.

Koch Institute member Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, serves as the inaugural director for the center.

A major goal for research at the Marble Center is to leverage the collaborative culture at the Koch Institute to use nanotechnology to improve cancer diagnosis and care in patients around the world, Bhatia says.

Transforming nanomedicine

The Marble Center joins MITs broader efforts at the forefront of discovery and innovation to solve the urgent global challenge that is cancer. The concept of convergence the blending of the life and physical sciences with engineering is a hallmark of MIT, the founding principle of the Koch Institute, and at the heart of the Marble Centers mission.

The center galvanizes the MIT cancer research community in efforts to use nanomedicine as a translational platform for cancer care, says Tyler Jacks, director of the Koch Institute and a David H. Koch Professor of Biology. Its transformative by applying these emerging technologies to push the boundaries of cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring and translational by promoting their development and application in the clinic.

The centers faculty six prominent MIT professors and Koch Institute members are committed to fighting cancer with nanomedicine through research, education, and collaboration. They are:

Sangeeta Bhatia (director), the John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science;

Daniel G. Anderson, the Samuel A. Goldblith Professor of Applied Biology in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science;

Angela M. Belcher, the James Mason Crafts Professor in the departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering;

Paula T. Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor of Engineering and head of the Department of Chemical Engineering;

Darrell J. Irvine, professor in the departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering; and

Robert S. Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor.

Extending their collaboration within the walls of the Institute, Marble Center members benefit greatly from the support of the Peterson (1957) Nanotechnology Materials Core Facility in the Koch Institutes Robert A. Swanson (1969) Biotechnology Center. The Peterson Facilitys array of technological resources and expertise is unmatched in the United States, and gives members of the center, and of the Koch Institute, a distinct advantage in the development and application of nanoscale materials and technologies.

Looking ahead

The Marble Center has wasted no time getting up to speed in its first year, and has provided support for innovative research projects including theranostic nanoparticles that can both detect and treat cancers, real-time imaging of interactions between cancer and immune cells to better understand response to cancer immunotherapies, and delivery technologies for several powerful RNA-based therapeutics able to engage specific cancer targets with precision.

As part of its efforts to help foster a multifaceted science and engineering research force, the center has provided fellowship support for trainees as well as valuable opportunities for mentorship, scientific exchange, and professional development.

Promotingbroader engagement, the Marble Center serves as a bridge to a wide network of nanomedicine resources, connecting its members to MIT.nano, other nanotechnology researchers, and clinical collaborators across Boston and beyond. The center has also convened a scientific advisory board, whose members hail from leading academic and clinical centers around the country, and will help shape the centers future programs and continued expansion.

As the Marble Center begins another year of collaborations and innovation, there is a new milestone in sight for 2018.Nanomedicine has been selected as the central theme for the Koch Institutes 17th Annual Cancer Research Symposium. Scheduled for June 15, 2018, the event will bring together national leaders in the field, providing an ideal forum for Marble Center members to share the discoveries and advancements made during its sophomore year.

Having next years KI Annual Symposium dedicated to nanomedicine will be a wonderful way to further expose the cancer research community to the power of doing science at the nanoscale, Bhatia says. The interdisciplinary approach has the power to accelerate new ideas at this exciting interface of nanotechnology and medicine.

To learn more about the people and projects of the Koch Institute Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, visit nanomedicine.mit.edu.

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Converging on cancer at the nanoscale - The MIT Tech

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Semiconductor-laced bunny eyedrops appear to nuke infections – The Register

Don't worry, little guy. They're really, really small!

In early lab experiments on rabbits, eyedrops laced with nanoparticles appear to combat bacterial keratitis, a serious infection of the cornea which can, in severe cases, cause blindness.

Researchers hope that these nanoparticles could someday offer a non-toxic alternative to antibiotics, which have the undesirable side effect of creating resistant bacteria.

A common treatment option is steroids, but they can cause scarring. Boffins have found that some nanomaterials, such as copper oxide and silicon, appear to damage bacterial cells. Lately, some groups have realised that carbon quantum dots really tiny semiconductors seem to offer similar benefits with low toxicity, the ability to disperse in water easily, and a relatively simple fabrication process.

"We think it should be safe," Han-Jia Lin, a biochemist at National Taiwan Ocean University in Keelung, told The Register. He and his team had previously studied quantum dots for wound healing in rats.

In the new study, Lin and his team created carbon quantum dots approximately six nanometers in diameter by heating spermidine at around 200oC for about three hours and placing the resultant dots in liquid. The ratio was about 0.4 per cent quantum dot to liquid.

The team infected rabbits with bacterial keratitis. Some received 4 per cent SMX antibiotics, some the quantum-filled eye drops, and others no treatment for control. The researchers found that the quantum dot eyedrop solution showed therapeutic effects right away, even after the first day. The dots were small enough to sneak into the cornea and destroy the bacterial cells.

This had something to do with the quantum dots' compatibility with the cells as well as how they destabilised the cell membranes. The researchers don't know exactly why they work.

By two weeks, the rabbits' eyes were mostly better the quantum dot eyedrop worked about as well as antibiotics. Lin says the treated rabbits showed no side effects from treatment.

A paper describing the research appeared this week in ACS Nano.

It's a "conceptually and technically quite elegant study with remarkable results" but "still with a couple of open questions and obvious risks before this could lead to any product that could help patients," Claus-Michael Lehr, a nanomedicine researcher at Saarland University in Saarbrcken, Germany, told The Reg.

First, he said the reasons why the nanomedicine has such strong bactericidal effects is "not easily explained". Second, the effect of opening tight junction tissue barriers (a potential risk in itself) needs to be shown to be reversible. Third, what chemical products are formed by the quantum dots are they toxic or carcinogenic?

Finally, he said it was wasn't clear how quantum dots that penetrate tissue would behave in the long term. "These structures are probably not biodegradable," he said, "and if they were, what metabolites are being formed?"

Lin says the next steps are to test the long-term effects of the quantum dots, but the the team is trying to be careful in their research to try to limit how they accumulate in bodies. Here, for example, they tested them on the eye.

Because the carbon quantum dots work on such a sensitive part of the body such as the eye without apparently harming cells, "This has potential," Lin said.

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Semiconductor-laced bunny eyedrops appear to nuke infections - The Register

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Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market Expected to Generate Huge Profits by 2015 2021: Persistence … – MilTech

Nanotechnology is one of the most promising technologies in 21st century. Nanotechnology is a term used when technological developments occur at 0.1 to 100 nm scale. Nano medicine is a branch of nanotechnology which involves medicine development at molecular scale for diagnosis, prevention, treatment of diseases and even regeneration of tissues and organs. Thus it helps to preserve and improve human health. Nanomedicine offers an impressive solution for various life threatening diseases such as cancer, Parkinson, Alzheimer, diabetes, orthopedic problems, diseases related to blood, lungs, neurological, and cardiovascular system.

Development of a new nenomedicine takes several years which are based on various technologies such as dendrimers, micelles, nanocrystals, fullerenes, virosome nanoparticles, nanopores, liposomes, nanorods, nanoemulsions, quantum dots, and nanorobots.

In the field of diagnosis, nanotechnology based methods are more precise, reliable and require minimum amount of biological sample which avoid considerable reduction in consumption of reagents and disposables. Apart from diagnosis, nanotechnology is more widely used in drug delivery purpose due to nanoscale particles with larger surface to volume ratio than micro and macro size particle responsible for higher drug loading. Nano size products allow to enter into body cavities for diagnosis or treatment with minimum invasiveness and increased bioavailability. This will not only improve the efficacy of treatment and diagnosis, but also reduces the side effects of drugs in case of targeted therapy.

Global nanomedicine market is majorly segmented on the basis of applications in medicines, targeted disease and geography. Applications segment includes drug delivery (carrier), drugs, biomaterials, active implant, in-vitro diagnostic, and in-vivo imaging. Global nanomedicine divided on the basis of targeted diseases or disorders in following segment: neurology, cardiovascular, oncology, anti-inflammatory, anti-infective and others. Geographically, nanomedicine market is classified into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and MEA. Considering nanomedicine market by application, drug delivery contribute higher followed by in-vitro diagnostics. Global nanomedicine market was dominated by oncology segment in 2012 due to ability of nanomedicine to cross body barriers and targeted to tumors specifically however cardiovascular nanomedicine market is fastest growing segment. Geographically, North America dominated the market in 2013 and is expected to maintain its position in the near future. Asia Pacific market is anticipated to grow at faster rate due to rapid increase in geriatric population and rising awareness regarding health care. Europe is expected to grow at faster rate than North America due to extensive product pipeline portfolio and constantly improving regulatory framework.

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Major drivers for nanomedicine market include improved regulatory framework, increasing technological know-how and research funding, rising government support and continuous increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, kidney disorder, and orthopedic diseases. Some other driving factors include rising number of geriatric population, awareness of nanomedicine application and presence of high unmet medical needs. Growing demand of nanomedicines from the end users is expected to drive the market in the forecast period. However, market entry of new companies is expected to bridge the gap between supply and demand of nanomedicines. Above mentioned drivers currently outweigh the risk associated with nanomedicines such as toxicity and high cost. At present, cancer is one of the major targeted areas in which nanomedicines have made contribution. Doxil, Depocyt, Abraxane, Oncospar, and Neulasta are some of the examples of pharmaceuticals formulated using nanotechnology.

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Key players in the global nanomedicine market include: Abbott Laboratories, CombiMatrix Corporation, GE Healthcare, Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Company, Inc., Nanosphere, Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., and UCB (Union chimique belge) S.A.

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Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market Expected to Generate Huge Profits by 2015 2021: Persistence ... - MilTech

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Nanoparticle delivery tech targets rare lung disease – In-PharmaTechnologist.com

Researchers at London, UK-based Imperial College are developing a technology to transport drugs directly to the lungs of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients.

The technology consists of ethanol-heated iron and trans-trans muconic acid nanoparticles that can be small molecule drug actives.

These particles can be delivered directly to the site of the disease according to lead researcher Jane Mitchell, who told us the targeted approach bypasses the toxicity issues that have held back development of less targeted, systemic nanomedicines.

One of the biggest limitations in nanomedicine is toxicity, some of the best nanomedicine structures do not make it past the initial stages of development, as they kill cells, said Mitchell.

However in a study published in Pulmonary Circulation , researchers explain that these metallic structures - called metal organic frameworks (MOF) are not harmful to cells.

We made these prototype MOFs, and have shown they were not toxic to a whole range of human lung cells, Mitchell told us.

The hope is that using this approach will ultimately allow for high concentrations of drugs we already have, to be delivered to only the vessels in the lung, and reduce side effects, she said.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)

PAH is a rare lung disease caused by changes to the smaller branches of the pulmonary arteries. The artery walls thicken, and eventually cause organ failure.

While no cure exists, treatments that open up blood vessels in the artery wall are available. According to Mitchell, these treatments can produce negative side effects.

The drugs available [for PAH]are all small molecule drugs which are seriously limited by systemic side effects. Therefore delivering these drugs to the site of disease in our metal organic frame-work (MOF) carrier would represent a paradigm step forward in technology to treat this disease, she said.

Further, researchers believe the MOF technology has therapeutic benefits of its own.

We know that the carriers can havetherapeutic benefits intheir own right such as reducing inflammation and, in the case of ourformation, the potential for imaging, said Mitchell.

For patients with PAH, it could mean we are able to turn it from a fatal condition, to a chronic manageable one, she said.

According to Mitchell, the technology is not expensive at the experimental level, and would be scaled up at commercial level.

We now need to perform proof of concept studies using carriers containing drugs in cell and animal based models. With funding, this will be complete within 2 years, she Mitchell.

Upon completion of clinical trials, the University hopes to license out the technology.

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Nano-sized drug carriers could be the future for patients with lung … – Phys.Org

July 3, 2017 by Ryan O'hare Nanomedicine could help patients with fatal lung conditions. Credit: Imperial College London

Metallic nanomolecules capable of carrying drugs to exactly where they are needed could one day help to treat patients with a fatal lung condition.

Scientists based at Imperial College London have tested a new type of nanoparticle called metal organic frameworks (MOF) tiny metal cages less than 100 nanometres across that can be loaded with drug molecules which they believe could potentially be used to treat patients with a devastating condition called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

In PAH the blood vessels of the lungs constrict and thicken, increasing blood pressure and causing the right side of the heart to work harder and harder, until it eventually fails. The condition is rare but devastating and can affect people of all ages, including babies, young adults and the elderly. Patients in the late stage of the disease have few treatment options beyond transplant, with a mean survival time of around five years following diagnosis.

While there is no cure for PAH, existing treatments work by opening up these blood vessels. These drugs act on blood vessels throughout the body, however, causing blood pressure to drop and resulting in a number of side effects which means the dose at which these drugs can be given is limited.

In their latest study, published online in Pulmonary Circulation, the multidisciplinary group at Imperial describes how it has taken the first in a number of steps to develop nanoparticles which could deliver drugs directly to the lungs, showing that the basic structures are not harmful to cells.

Professor Jane Mitchell, from the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial, who led the research, said: "The hope is that using this approach will ultimately allow for high concentrations of drugs we already have to be delivered to only the vessels in the lung, and reduce side effects. For patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, it could mean we are able to turn it from a fatal condition, to a chronic manageable one."

Metallic cages for drug delivery

The tiny metallic structures composed of iron were made in the lab of Professor Paul Lickiss and Dr Rob Davies's, from the Department of Chemistry and by Dr Nura Mohamed during her PhD studies at Imperial. Dr Mohamed, who was funded by the Qatar Foundation, made the structures so existing drugs used to treat PAH could fit inside them.

These structures were tested in human lung cells and blood vessel cells, which were grown from stem cells in the blood of patients with PAH. The team found that the structures reduced inflammation and were not toxic to the cells.

Further tests showed that the MOFs were safe in rats, with animals injected with MOFs over a two-week period showing few side effects other than a slight build-up of iron in the liver.

"One of the biggest limitations in nanomedicine is toxicity, some of best nanomedicine structures do not make it past the initial stages of development as they kill cells," said Professor Mitchell. "We made these prototype MOFs, and have shown they were not toxic to a whole range of human lung cells."

MOFs are an area of interest in nanomedicine, with engineers aiming to develop them as carriers which can hold onto drug cargo, releasing it under specific conditions, such as changes in pH, temperature, or even when the nanostructures are drawn to the target area by magnets outside the body.

Beyond the finding that their iron nanostructures were non-toxic, the team believes the MOFs may have additional therapeutic properties. There was evidence to suggest anti-inflammatory properties, with the MOFs reducing the levels of an inflammatory marker in the blood vessels, called endothelin-1, which causes arteries to constrict. In addition, iron is also a contrast agent, meaning it would show up on scans of the lungs to show where the drug had reached.

The MOFs have not yet been tested in patients, but the next step is to load the tiny metallic structures with drugs and work out the best way to get them to target their cargo to the lungs. The researchers are confident that if successful, the approach could move to trials for patients, with a drug candidate ready to test within the next five years. The MOFs could potentially be delivered by an inhaler into the lung, or administered by injection.

"In this study we have proved the principle that this type of carrier has the potential to be loaded with a drug and targeted to the lung," explained Professor Mitchell. "This is fundamental research and while this particular MOF might not be the one that makes it to a drug to treat PAH, our work opens up the idea that this disease should be considered with an increased research effort for targeted drug delivery."

Explore further: Longer-lasting pain relief with MOFs

More information: Nura A. Mohamed et al. Chemical and biological assessment of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) in pulmonary cells and in an acute in vivo model: relevance to pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy, Pulmonary Circulation (2017). DOI: 10.1177/2045893217710224

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