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Category : Veganism

How veganism and other plant-based diets are becoming mainstream – Iowa State Daily

Veganism is one of many popular diets available to people looking to try a new diet.

Eating less meat and more plants are becoming an increasing topic of conversation.

People all over the country are constantly talking about the health benefits of becoming vegan and plant-based.Even though the diets are used interchangeably, they are very different from each other.

Veganism is a practice that stays away from animal products of any kind, including items such as makeup, hair products, clothing and furniture; plant-based diets do not have an issue with buying animal-based products and are more concerned about the health benefits from eating fruits and vegetables.

The awareness of the term veganism and plant-based is growing;40 percent of Americans are making an effort to consumemore plant-based foods on a daily diet.

It's popular today because a lot of consumers are reading about how meat production affects the environment and has led, among other things, to climate change, all true but there are many nuances, said Smaranda Andrews, assistant teaching professor in food and nutrition sciences at Iowa State.

Even though the popularity of veganism and plant-based diets has been growing, people tend to forget many people throughout history have eaten plant-based diets. In history, some families could not afford meat and treated it as a luxury.

Throughout history, humans ate mainly plant-based diets, Andrews said. Meat was always a luxury and it still is for the vast majority of people on this planet. Meat... was eaten on special occasions and only the wealthy could afford meat more often because meat is expensive to produce and takes a lot of resources.

Many people in the U.S. consume most of the meat available today compared to other countries. Andrews says the U.S. consumes 124 kilograms per capita per year, while India, for example, consumes about 4 kilograms per person per year. This has occurred in the last 50 to 60 years.

Concerningmore mainstreammedia, there are many recipe books, food blogs and Food Network shows that are showing people how to cook vegan meals while educating the importance of this diet. This diet is also diverse, ranging from all genders, age groups and races who are consuming more fruits and vegetables.

The popularity has grown so much that many restaurants are providing options for people to continue their diet. Fast food chains such as Burger King and KFC have changed their menu to include more vegan-friendly options. Colleges have also adjusted their dining meals to vegan and plant-based options for their students to pick from.

After breaking her ACL from sports, Vegan Knees owner, creator and photographer Keesha Ward noticed after a few years of eating a plant-based diet she did not have any health concerns.

I got a letter in a mail from the hospital saying that they were going to drop me, and I was like why am I coming in like Im fine, Ward said. My body felt different. Even though I did it for my knees I did it for my future without looking back.

Many people have ongoing questions about being vegan or plant-based, including where to start.It'simportant to know what is going into the body rather than buying it beforehand.

Your goal is to listen to your body and the signals that it is giving you because that will tell you exactly what the foods are doing to you, Ward said.

Eating plant-based or vegan can not only improve diets, but the environment as well. While experiencing this COVID-19 pandemic, we are starting to see how quickly the environment has changed since everyone has been social distancing.

Meat-packing plants and food distribution factories have employees that are constantly being overworked. This causes damaging and excessive pollution to the air.

Because our environment can not really sustain people eating mass amounts of meat and dairy any longer, three meals a day of animal products are affecting the environment, said Lyssa Wade, the owner of Veggie Thumper. "Now that we are experiencing pandemics, were starting to see how poorly workers are treated, people are starting to realize things. We kind of lost touch with the land because people are so reliant on everything being so fast and readily available."

Even though it may be hard and you might want to give it up, its OK. The first time is not the last time.

Being plant-based and vegan is not for everybody, but it is a good place to start a healthy diet if it is the best choice for you.

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How veganism and other plant-based diets are becoming mainstream - Iowa State Daily

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Behind the Menu | From-scratch Ethiopian fare offered at Nile Vegan – The Columbus Dispatch

Located on the south end of the University District, the Ethiopian restaurant offers inexpensive, scratch-made fare. Although misconceptions abound, vegan fare does not necessarily mean light fare, owner Siyum Tefera said.

In central Ohios growing ethnic dining scene, Nile Vegan will have a familiar appeal to some and be a truly adventuresome dining experience for others.

Located on the south end of the University District, the Ethiopian restaurant offers inexpensive, scratch-made fare.

Although misconceptions abound, vegan fare does not necessarily mean light fare, owner Siyum Tefera said.

"I would say our food is very filling," Tefera said.

Most entrees are served with injera, a style of unbaked flatbread made from teft flour that ferments for three days.

The coiled piece of bread is sponge-like in texture and tangy in flavor, meant to scoop up the food on the plate.

Yes, that means eating with ones hands is preferred at Nile Vegan.

The mushroom stew ($9.99) offers cremini and button mushrooms sauteed in vegan butter (coconut, avocado and grapeseed oil) with peppers, tomatoes and onions and berbere spices, a dry mixture of chile peppers, black pepper, dried ginger, dried garlic and salt, common in many dishes.

By and large, Nile Vegans dishes arent substantially spicy, according to Teferas standards.

The curry vegetable medley ($7.99) offers a broad range of textural notes with cabbage, potatoes and carrots, plus onion and garlic, and a yellow hue from turmeric plus a bite from jalapeno.

"I would say its very tolerable, he said. "We actually get quite a few requests, asking us to make it spicier."

The restaurant dips into popular territory for those on a no-meat, non-dairy diet.

Kale ($9.99), the green goddess of modern veganism, is stewed in tomatoes, onions and other seasonings, along with ground chickpeas, which cook down to a consistency smoother than hummus.

With the "specialty" tofu ($9.99), the dehydrated bean curd is cut into cubes and stewed in the rich, ubiquitous spice mixture, leaving the protein with a firm texture.

Combination platters, featuring smaller portions of up to four entrees, are available as well.

The restaurant has temporarily stopped serving breakfast but plans to resume those hours in the next few weeks, in plenty of time for incoming Ohio State University students, Tefera said.

The business took a hit from the coronavirus pandemic but has rebounded lately, he said.

"Its been pretty decent," he said. "Were starting to get things rolling again."

onrsestaurants@dispatch.com

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Behind the Menu | From-scratch Ethiopian fare offered at Nile Vegan - The Columbus Dispatch

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Vegan restaurant Neon Tiger opens on King Street with plant-based drinks, pizzas and a look into the future – Charleston City Paper

Neon Tiger is John Adamson's newest project, a moody and mysterious upper King Street spot that has him focusing on growing the vegan food community in Charleston after making a name for himself with engaging restaurant design at popular Charleston destinations like The Rarebit.

Opening an entirely plant-based restaurant and cocktail bar is more than just a business endeavor for Adamson, who previously owned The Rarebit along with The Americano, a Cuban-themed Mount Pleasant eatery that closed in 2017. According to the restaurateur, he spent most of his life as a meat-eating American until 2017 when he first experienced what vegans call "making the connection" between animals and the meat on your plate.

"I had never even considered any form of veganism or vegetarianism before I made the connection, but once I did, I instantly went vegan," Adamson said. "And, I also simultaneously became an activist."

This newly found calling to advocate for veganism, a diet that avoids animal-derived food and products tested on animals, is driving the cuisine at Neon Tiger. Look for an entirely vegan cocktail menu paired with an innovative assortment of dishes created by Toronto-based chef Doug McNish who has worked on vegan menus at restaurants in Canada, the United States, Europe and Australia. Currently, the restaurant is operating with limited offerings featuring pizzas, sides and salads while McNish is stuck in Canada due to COVID-19. But in the coming months, the full menu is set to have vegan versions of pasta, tacos, burgers, crab cakes, mac and cheese and desserts.

An early favorite has been the fried "shrimp" made from konjac, a high-fiber herb that grows in parts of Asia. Pizzas are made using non-GMO flour and topped with an assortment of vegetables and proteins like crispy soy bacon and seitan pepperoni.

"Making vegan meat substitutes is really about the texture and the flavors," Adamson said. "Now, we can replicate the texture and we can absolutely replicate the flavor."

"I was so excited about this place as a consumer," said Neon Tiger general manager Isabelle Maloney. "Because there isn't a place in Charleston where you can go and not have to wonder if the bartenders are using egg whites or Worcestershire. To be able to come in as a vegan, vegetarian or just someone who's curious and know that you can pick off the entire menu is really exciting."

Adamson's plans for Neon Tiger's local footprint are lofty, as he hopes the restaurant can be more than just a place to go for healthy, delicious cuisine and cocktails. Currently, he is in the process of getting the restaurant classified as a B Corporation, which would make it one of only three in South Carolina. B Corps are part regular corporation and part nonprofit, keeping consumers informed about the way the business spends its money.

Adamson will start by contributing a percentage of profits to the Agriculture Fairness Alliance, an organization working to give the vegan community a voice in debates over agricultural policy.

Adamson says the impact of animal agriculture on the world's oceans inspired Neon Tiger's eclectic decor. The dark colors, retro futuristic murals and eye-catching plant wall are all meant to depict what the world might look like in 2048 the year when some experts believe oceans will be dead due to pollution and climate change.

"Neon Tiger is supposed to be a glitch in the matrix," Adamson said.

The current menu is just a small taste of what Neon Tiger plans to offer, and Adamson hopes Charleston can catch up to other cities with a strong vegan presence. Unlike cities which boast dozens of vegan restaurants Toronto, Los Angeles and New York City Charleston has very few all-vegan options.

"The vegan community is growing every day," said Maloney. "And, in terms of other cities, I think Charleston is very behind especially for being such a culinary destination and a food and bev town."

Adamson and Maloney hope to clear the way for more vegan restaurants as Charlestonians begin to venture into Neon Tiger for a pia colada with oat milk or an old fashioned with date syrup and stay for a bite of something delicious.

For the time being, the restaurant is only open for takeout 5-9 p.m., but follow @neon_tiger_ on Instagram to get the scoop on the dining room's opening date and expanded menu.

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Vegan restaurant Neon Tiger opens on King Street with plant-based drinks, pizzas and a look into the future - Charleston City Paper

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis – Wicked Local Franklin

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are on the Nirvana Tea House & Caf's menu, all researched by Shift Manager Kelly Harris. The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally friendly and pay their workers fairly, said owner Ed Williamson, and its teas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

MILLIS Thirteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas, Franklin resident Ed Williamson, his hiking guide, a horseman and a cook set up and broke down tents across the mountain for 10 days last year. They never had to worry about finding a stranger living in a tent on that mountain in Bhutan who wasn't willing to invite them in for a cup of tea.

That welcome over a cup of tea, remind Williamson of his childhood.

The tea was just a way to talk, said Williamson, who grew up in Cork, Ireland, with a mother who lit a burner for the teapot whenever company was invited over.

Anyone that came to visit the teapot went on," he said."I grew up drinking tea; coffee was not something we drank. That whole (experience drinking tea with strangersin theHimalayas) reminded me of home.

Its a concept and a feeling hes infused in opening his own vegan caf and tea house in Millis. He opened Nirvana Tea House & Caf, at 969 Main St., in late June with the help of his three managers - General Manager Keith Maher and Shift Managers Tamra Saegh and Kelly Harris, who came up with the cafs name.

The word nirvana is really about being in a happy place, said Williamson.

Williamson said the vegan and plant-based caf was slated to open earlier this spring, but halfway through completion, the coronavirus pandemic hit.

But if we can survive in this, well do all right, said Williamson, who also owns the Pathways Wellness Center next to the tea house where he teaches tai chi, meditation andmindful living classes. The space where the caf sits was once his studio where he taught classes.

From "meat and potatoes tolentils and quinoa

Growing up in Ireland, Williamson was raised on a meat and potatoes diet, he said, and he rarely ate any pasta. He moved to the United States at 23 to find work as a carpenter, first living in Westwood for a week then moving out to Medway in 1985 for a job.

About half a year later he moved to Franklin, where hes lived for the last 35 years. He has his own construction business in town - called Impressions Building Corp. and these last few months during the pandemic haveresulted in lots of work, he said.

Its been crazy busy, everyone that I know in the construction business is doing fine, he said, explaining that he mainly works on remodeling and home additions. He became a vegetarian 11 years ago when his then 12-year-old daughter said she wanted to become avegetarian, and that her father should, too.

I thought Id miss (animal products) but I dont, he said. Theres so much good stuff to eat thats vegan.

Veganism was a rare topic of conversation in Ireland when he left in 1985, he said. But last October, he returned to the country and there weremore vegan eateries in his hometown of Cork than in the Milford region.

Satisfying cravings

He wondered if a local vegan placewould ever open in the area.

Because then I dont have to worry about what Im choosing, said Williamson, who was also an avid tea house customer. He especially loves the Dobr tea franchise, butits closest location is in Northampton.

The caf offers a range of vegan bowls, salads and wraps, from the "baba buddha wrap," which features hummus, baba ganoush, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, Kalamata olives andred onion with a side of dressed mixed greens, to the lentil love bowl, made with organic white rice, stewed lentils, carrot saut, celery, golden raisins, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, purple cabbage, radishes and coconut curry dressing.

Some of its ingredients are sourced from Tangerini's Farm in Millis, which also makes treats for the caf based off recipes from Mahar. Currently, those treats include lemon poppy seed matcha bread, chai cakes and blueberry ginger scones.

But thecaf isnt just for vegan customers, Williamson said. Regular meat-eaters will also enjoy what they have to offer.

His non-vegetarian accountant came in to try the cafs Mediterranean platter the other day, which is served with baba ganoush, a mashed eggplant blended with tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and salt. It was the first time he had tried the concoction.

Hes hooked on it now, said Williamson.

Many individually selected teas

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are offered on the cafs menu, all researched by Harris.Those teas include black, green, chai, Earl Grey, herbal, oolong, purple, rooibos, white, yellow, iced and tea lattes.

The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally friendly and pay their workers fairly,said Williamson, and itsteas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

In some of those places in Africa, a path for elephants to pass through the farm has been constructed by workers to make space for them as they migrate. Williamson said they even know some of the names of workers on these farms.

Tea is served to customers at their tables, and at full capacity, seating is offered for about 25 to 30 people,he said.Currently, because of the pandemic, only about half that much indoor seating is available, with another dozen or so seats outside.

Inside is a hand-painted mural of a tea farm by Norfolk artist Jason Sawtelle of BlackBeak studios, who also designed the cafs logo. On the floor are two colorful rugs with swirling dragons that he was told once sat inside the office of the king of Bhutan, a country located in the eastern Himalayas south of Tibet.

Williamsonwas given them by his Himalayan guide who said the rugs were being tossed out of the office because they were too small.

Workersdont accept tips at the caf, said Williamson, stating that he paysthem more than minimum wage at $17 an hour. For those who want to tip, himself and managers are narrowing down three charities for customers to donate to one for hunger relief, another to support the environment and the other to promote human justice. Customers can choose which charity they want to donate to.

The Nirvana Tea House & Caf is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Lauren Young writes about politics, social issues and covers the town of Franklin. Reach her at 774-804-1499 or lyoung@wickedlocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @laurenatmilford.

Link:
Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis - Wicked Local Franklin

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis – MetroWest Daily News

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are served on the Nirvana Tea House & Caf's menu, all researched by Shift Manager Kelly Harris. The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally-friendly and pay their workers fairly, said Owner Ed Williamson, and its teas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

MILLIS Thirteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas, Franklin resident Ed Williamson, his hiking guide, a horseman and a cook set up and broke down tents across the mountain for 10 days last year. They never had to worry about finding a stranger living in a tent on that mountain in Bhutan who wasn't willing to invite them in for a cup of tea.

That welcome over a cup of tea, remind Williamson of his childhood.

The tea was just a way to talk, said Williamson who grew up in Cork, Ireland, with a mother who lit a burner for the teapot whenever company was invited over.

Anyone that came to visit the tea pot went on," he said."I grew up drinking tea, coffee was not something we drank. That whole (experience drinking tea with strangersin theHimalayas) reminded me of home.

Its a concept and a feeling hes infused in opening his own vegan caf and tea house in Millis. He opened Nirvana Tea House & Caf, at 969 Main St., in late June with the help of his three managers - General Manager Keith Maher and Shift Managers Tamra Saegh and Kelly Harris, who came up with the cafs name.

The word nirvana is really about being in a happy place, said Williamson.

Williamson said the vegan and plant-based caf was slated to open earlier this spring, but halfway through completion, the coronavirus pandemic hit.

But if we can survive in this, well do alright, said Williamson, who also owns the Pathways Wellness Center next to the tea house where he teaches tai chi, meditation andmindful living classes. The space where the caf sits was once his studio where he taught classes.

From "meat and potatoes tolentils and quinoa

Growing up in Ireland, Williamson was raised on a meat and potatoes diet, he said, and rarely ate any pasta. He moved to the United States at 23 to find work as a carpenter, first living in Westwood for a week then moving out to Medway in 1985 for a job.

About half a year later he moved to Franklin, where hes lived for the last 35 years. He has his own construction business in town - called Impressions Building Corp. and these last few months during the pandemic haveresulted in lots of work, he said.

Its been crazy busy, everyone that I know in the construction business is doing fine, he said, working mainly on remodeling and home additions. He became a vegetarian 11 years ago when his then 12-year-old daughter,said she waswanted to become avegetarian, and that her father should too.

I thought Id miss (animal products) but I dont, he said. Theres so much good stuff to eat thats vegan.

Veganism was a rare topic of conversation in Ireland when he left in 1985, he said. But last October, he returned to the country and there weremore vegan eateries in his hometown of Cork than in the Milford region.

Satisfying cravings

He wondered if a local vegan placewould ever open in the area.

Because then I dont have to worry about what Im choosing, said Williamson, also an avid tea house customer. He especially loves the Dobr tea franchise, butits closest location is in Northampton.

The caf offers a range of vegan bowls, salads and wraps, from the baba buddha wrap, which features hummus, baba ganoush, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, kalamata olives andred onion with a side of dressed mixed greens, to the lentil love bowl, made with organic white rice, stewed lentils, carrot saut, celery, golden raisins, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, purple cabbage, radishes and coconut curry dressing.

Some of its ingredients travel from Tangerini's Farm in Millis, which also makes treats for the caf based off recipes from Mahar. Currently, those treats include lemon poppy seed matcha bread, chai cakes and blueberry ginger scones.

But thecaf isnt just for vegan customers, Williamson said regular meat-eaters will also enjoy what they have to offer.

His non-vegetarian accountant came in to try the cafs Mediterranean platter the other day, which is served with baba ganoush, a mashed eggplant blended with tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and salt. It was the first time he had tried the concoction.

Hes hooked on it now, said Williamson.

Many individually selected teas

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are served on the cafs menu, all researched by Harris.Those teas include black, green, chai, Earl Grey, herbal, oolong, purple, rooibos, white, yellow, iced and tea lattes.

The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally-friendly and pay their workers fairly,said Williamson, and itsteas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

In some of those places in Africa, a path for elephants to pass through the farm has been constructed by workers to make space for them as they migrate through. Williamson said they even know some of the names of workers on these farms.

Tea is served to customers at their tables, and at full capacity, seating is offered for about 25 to 30 people,he said.Currently only about half that much seating is available during the pandemic, with another dozen or so seats outside.

Inside is a hand-painted mural of a tea farm by Norfolk-based artist Jason Sawtelle of BlackBeak studios, who also designed the cafs logo. On the floor are two colorful rugs with swirling dragons that once sat inside the king of Bhutans office, a country located near Nepal and above Bangladesh.

Williamsonwas given them by his Himalayan guide who said the rugs were being tossed out of the office because they were too small.

Workersdont accept tips at the caf, said Williamson, stating that he paysthem more than minimum wage at $17 an hour. For those who want to tip, himself and managers are narrowing down three charities for customers to donate to one for hunger relief, another to support the environment and the other to promote human justice. Customers can choose which charity they want to donate to.

The Nirvana Tea House & Caf is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Lauren Young writes about politics, social issues and covers the town of Franklin. Reach her at 774-804-1499 or lyoung@wickedlocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @laurenatmilford.

Excerpt from:
Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis - MetroWest Daily News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Saving Earth: Is veganism good for the planet? Here’s why the solution is not that simple – MEAWW

Planet Earth is in dire need of solutions. Astronomer Carl Sagan once said that we have a responsibility "to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known." Our campaign Saving Earth focuses on nature and wildlife conservation and this column will feature stories on the pressing needs of our planet and hopefulness of our fight.

While the fossil fuel industry takes a chunk of the rap for its carbon footprint, meat and dairy industries aren't far behind. In fact, scientists say that avoiding meat and dairy is the single biggest way the average person can contribute to the fight against anthropogenic climate change. Meat production is the primary source of methane emissions a greenhouse gas 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide over a 20-year period and beef cattle produced over 70 percent of it via enteric fermentation (belching and farting) in 2016. Dairy production accounted for another 25 percent that year.

A 2018reportfrom the EPA found that methane emissions from beef cattle increased in the United States by nearly 2 percent between 1990 and 2016, driven in part by increases in the cattle population.Animal-based foods tend to have a higher footprint than plant-based. Lamb and cheese both emit more than 20 kilograms CO2-equivalents per kilogram. Poultry and pork have lower footprints but are still higher than most plant-based foods, at 6 and 7 kg CO2-equivalents, respectively.

Most greenhouse gas emissions result from land-use change and from processes at the farm stage. Farm-stage emissions include processes such as the application of fertilizers both organic ("manure management") and synthetic and enteric fermentation (the production of methane in the stomachs of cattle). Combined, land use and farm-stage emissions account for more than 80% of the footprint for most foods.

So, the argument for going vegan is quite clear. Veganism avoids meat and dairy and has been touted as the way to go if you want to help save the planet, in addition to getting healthier. However, veganism has its downfalls too, and what it comes to is that the unsustainable consumption of food vegan or not that needs to be addressed.

For instance, many vegan-favorite foods are not as green as one might think. Quinoa a vegan superfood that is popular in veganism is often flown halfway across the planet from where it is farmed in South America. The carbon footprint from that air travel is often more than eating meat that is locally sourced. Delicate fruits like blueberries and strawberries, for example, are often imported to Europe and the US by air to fill gaps left when local fruits are out of season.

Research by Angelina Frankowska, who studies sustainability at the University of Manchester, recently found that asparagus eaten in the UK has the highest carbon footprint compared to any other vegetable eaten in the country, with 5.3kg of carbon dioxide being produced for every kilogram of asparagus, mainly because it is imported by air from Peru.

Another vegan favorite is the avocado it is a versatile fruit that can be used in toasts, milkshakes and salads, to name a few. However, avocado production has an emissions footprint of 846.36g CO2, almost twice the size of one kilo of bananas (480g). This is because of the complexities involved in growing, ripening and transporting the popular green fruit.

Avocados are mostly grown in the tropical southern hemisphere, in countries such as Chile, Peru, or South Africa, and need to be imported to the countries in the global north, where avocado consumption is popular. They also use huge amounts of water in production. A single mature tree in California, for example, needs up to 209 liters (46 gallons) every day in the summer more than what is needed to fill a large bathtub. In some areas, like Peru and Chile, the growing demand for the crop has led toillegal extraction from riversand has been blamed for anincreasing water-shortage crisis.

There are, of course, other factors to consider as well. Artificial fertilizers, for example, account for at least 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the industry. The production of synthetic fertilizer emits carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane into the atmosphere, while their use on fields releases nitrous oxide, another potent greenhouse gas.

Agricultural practices such as the tilling of fields also release large volumes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and help to speed up erosion.The truth, however, is that the current lifestyles and consumption rates are far too unsustainable to be good for the planet. Reducing meat consumption is certainly important to address this concern, and while going vegan might help, we need to be more mindful of choosing what we eat.

Link:
Saving Earth: Is veganism good for the planet? Here's why the solution is not that simple - MEAWW

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

DoorDashs Vegan Burger Orders Have Increased 443% – LIVEKINDLY

Food delivery service DoorDash has reported a major increase in vegan burger orders.

The company unveiled this years hottest food trends in its newly released DoorDash Deep Dish report.

The mid-year report outlines top takeout and cooking trends using order data from January 1 to June 30. It also used data from a national consumer survey, which polled 2,000 Americans on their eating and cooking habits during the pandemic.

Research shows demand for plant-based foods is on the rise. The survey found that those between the ages of 18 and 24 ranked plant-based foods as the most appetizing. Plant-based burgers were especially popular. The food delivery service reported a 443 percent increase in vegan burger orders this year.

According to the DoorDash Deep Dish report, food habits are changing amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Twenty percent of the surveys respondents said they have seriously considered veganism. Six percent say they currently are or have been vegan in the past.

Vegetable pasta was ranked the most appetizing plant-based dish. On the contrary, tofu dishes were ranked the least appetizing.

The study also found that plant-based meat, like vegan burgers, is more popular among millennials. Those between the ages of 18 and 24 ranked plant-based meat as being more appetizing than vegetable pasta, which was more popular among other generations.

New data from the Plant Based Foods Association (PBFA), released in June, backs up DoorDashs study.

PBFA is a trade organization that represents some of the biggest vegan food companies. The data, produced with retail analytics firm SPINS, found that panic-buying amid the outbreak has contributed to a surge in US vegan food sales.

In the 16 weeks leading up to April 19, sales of plant-based cheeses, meats, tofu, and tempeh outpaced all other food sales. Compared to the same time period last year, vegan food sales were up by 90 percent.

Plant-based meat sales were 50 percent higher during the peak-panic buying period compared to animal-based meat sales. Dairy-free cheese sales surged 95 percent during the same timeframe.

In a statement, Julie Emmett, PBFAs senior director of retail partnerships, said the data proves consumers are increasingly turning to plant-based food options.

Even after the highest panic-buying period, plant-based foods growth remains strong, proving that this industry has staying power, she said.

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DoorDashs Vegan Burger Orders Have Increased 443% - LIVEKINDLY

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Why beef producers should listen to vegan opinions – Farm Weekly

ON the back of radical protests, private property trespassing and the controversial online mapping of animal production operations in Australia, mainstream media dubbed 2019 'The Year of the Vegan'.

Come a global health pandemic and the significant gains in influence the anti-meat agenda had secured appear to have taken a setback. As mince became scarce in panic buying sprees, plant-based products went out of date on shelves and marketing experts noted actions speak louder than rhetoric.

Still, no one believes veganism is dead in the water and indeed the time may well be ripe for finding common ground.

Researcher Erin Stranks firmly believes there are shared values between vegans and livestock producers and a far better way forward than the antagonism that was in full flight last year.

Honours student at Charles Sturt University's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences in Wagga Wagga Erin Stranks outlined her research into vegan culture at the Graham Centre Livestock Forum today.

An honours student at Charles Sturt University's School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences in Wagga Wagga, she has designed qualitative research investigating the shared, and opposed, values and the possibility of collaboration to achieve common goals.

Speaking at the 2020 Graham Centre Livestock Forum, held virtually today, Ms Stranks said when she tells people her area of research, she is immediately asked if she is a vegan.

Her answer: "I'm a keen omnivore with a curious nature" and therein lies a key element to the veganism movement that livestock producers should take on board.

Consumer curiosity around how, by whom, and where food is produced is opening doors for vegan culture to challenge views around consumption of meat and the use of animal products.

By understanding vegan culture, and the shifts around meat consumption that are taking place among consumers, livestock producers can facilitate positive and productive conversations for change and innovation, Ms Stranks said.

Her research is still in an early stage but she says she can already see overlaps in values between the two seemingly polarised positions - in animal welfare concern, a want for progress and innovative and a lessening environmental impact, for example.

Why should producers listen to vegan opinions?

Major consumer insight work has shown that one in 10 Australians are reducing their meat intake, led by baby boomers aged 56 to -76, Ms Stranks said.

"Economically, the plant based industry in Australia grossed $150m last year and is expected to increase to $3b by 2030. By comparison, the livestock industry grossed $66b and provided employment to 400,000.

"While the plant-based industry has less of an economic significance, there is clearly an increase in monetary value awarded to these foods by consumers."

It is for this crucial reason the Australian livestock industry must not remain ignorant towards vegan culture - their entire livelihood rests on consumer preference, according to Ms Stranks.

"Livestock producers are relying on social licence, which is the approval from consumers to operate," she said.

"When veganism's social licence increases, livestock producers' decreases.

"My research of literature is showing that involving all stakeholders in conversations around animal welfare can increase the social licence of producers.

"Understanding vegan views might be key to sustainability of the livestock industry."

Data will be collected via an online survey which explores attitudes, ethics and morals surrounding animal welfare.

To take part, head here.

From new market opportunities for dairy bobby calves to the economics of feeding cull cows and from lessons learned on containment feeding to bovine respiratory disease, the online Graham Centre Livestock Forum was information-intensive and comprehensive. Stayed tuned to Farmonline for more reports.

The story Why beef producers should listen to vegan opinions first appeared on Farm Online.

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Why beef producers should listen to vegan opinions - Farm Weekly

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Veganism doesnt need to break the bank, says food blogger – Food For Mzansi

For some, the thought of going vegan or vegetarian leaves them in an utter frenzy. Meat is the staple of most households and while it might even save them a couple of rands, some people are still put off at the idea of ultimately opting for a plant-based and meat-free lifestyle.

The stereotypes around veganism are that it is a bland and expensive lifestyle to maintain, says Cape Town-based food blogger Anda Mtshemla (24). But she has made it her mission to dispel the uninformed myths associated with the widely revered dietary option.

She says the reality is actually the complete opposite to the myths. There is so much variety and many combinations and flavours in vegan foods. That is what inspired me to start my blog.

RECIPE: Vegan umfino with rosemary garlic mushrooms

Mtshemla is the visionary behind 24 Karrots, a blog that assists those curious about veganism with inexpensive meal options and gives much-needed education around this increasingly popular lifestyle.

Drawing much of her meal ideas and inspirations from more prominent blogs, she wants to normalize a cheaper and healthier vegan lifestyle saying, people normally view veganism as other and a weird thing.

Anda Mtshemla, a Cape Town-based blogger, went vegan at age 12. Photo: Supplied

Good food is often the thing that brings South Africans together. Who does not like a nice lamb tjop that comes from the heart of the Karoo? Slaughtering and eating meat together forms a fundamental part of our African culture. So, this will obviously make it more difficult for some to opt for a plant-based diet.

Mtshemla was born in Johannesburg and she spent most of her upbringing in the City of Gold. She now spends most of her time between Cape Town and East London. When she is with her family, they all enjoy a vegan lifestyle, she says. My parents respect my lifestyle and they, too, mostly eat vegan when I am home.

She decided to become vegan at the age of twelve after watching a documentary with gruesome imagery of the violence that animals endured in slaughterhouses. After watching that documentary, I decided I wanted to be a vegetarian. Eight years later, I decided to finally become vegan, and I have not looked back since, the food blogger says.

So far, some of her career highlights as a foodie include working with The Fry Family Food Company, a vegan foods company for which she produced vegan recipes. She also promoted the work and campaigns run by Veganuary, a British non-profit organisation that promotes veganism for the month of January.

People normally view veganism as other and a weird thing.

While some people might want to try out a vegan lifestyle, the cost associated with adopting this lifestyle is often off-putting.

Veganism can definitely be expensive, Mtshemla explains. When she goes restaurants, the vegan option of an otherwise animal product does bite at the wallet sometimes. But if you take it to basics and take it back to whole foods such as lentils, beans and rice, these are the cheaper foods. Vegetables and fruits are cheaper options, she says, for those starting a vegan diet.

Much of the food that we consume nowadays is highly processed and full of preservatives. Mtshemla believes that if you opt for an inexpensive vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, you will feel much better.

Do everything from your perspective and bring your unique point of view.

You stay fuller for longer, because you are not eating something that is packed with sugar and corn syrup.

Mtshemla believes that a vegan diet is healthier than an omnivorous diet, given that it is lower in salt and cholesterol and high in fiber. A study also found that people who eat vegan and vegetarian have a lower risk of heart disease, but a higher risk of a stroke, most likely due to lack of vitamin B12.

While people might think it is a good idea to entirely chuck out their meat at once to go completely vegan, Mtshemla advises against this.

The 24 Karrots blogger believes the vegan lifestyle is magic for the body. Photo: Supplied

It should be a gradual process, otherwise it wont work. Remember, you are introducing new foods and you do not know how your body is going to react. It might be difficult to adjust to everything all at once. She also recommends that you keep your cooking routine, but just substitute all of the ingredients with a vegan alternative.

She encourages people to finish what is in their fridge and replace it with a vegan alternative. Finish your dairy milk in the refrigerator and replace it with soy or almond milk. If your mayonnaise is finished, replace it with a vegan option.

If you have your hopes up for becoming a vegan food blogger or home chef, Mtshemla emphasizes that you need to remain authentic to yourself and what your brand is about. Do everything from your perspective and bring your unique point of view thats really what is going to make you stand out, she says.

Mtshemla says that although she is not sure where she sees 24 Karrots going (I am an Aries and not great at planning,), she does have high hopes that her brand becomes a household South African name and a go-to for those wanting try out a vegan lifestyle.

RECIPE: Vegan umfino with rosemary garlic mushrooms

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Veganism doesnt need to break the bank, says food blogger - Food For Mzansi

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The Revolutionary Potential of Vegan Politics – Sentient Media

Veganism is more than a dietits a political framework that challenges us to reexamine our relationship with gender, sexuality, and power in our everyday lives.

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Veganism is more than a dietits a political framework that challenges us to reexamine our relationship with gender, sexuality, and power in our everyday lives.

In April, a month into the COVID-19 epidemic, I was back in my hometown in Morgantown, WV. Baltimore, the city where I was living before the pandemic hit, had completely shut down. I had been onboarded remotely for my new job in animal law, and my partner and I had just split up, so I came back home to the mountains. My co-edited collection, Queer and Trans Voices: Achieving Liberation Through Consistent Anti-Oppression, was published during this precarious time, despite the uncertainty we were and still are facing. In this collection, queer vegans were asked to explore the interconnections between their identitiesbeing LGBTQIA+ and veganand how they impacted the way they walked through the world. Being in my childhood home when this anthology was released pushed me to interrogate my own identities and how being vegan had impacted my gender, sexuality, and politicsand vice versa. I found that when I stand up for queer liberation, I am also standing up for animal rights. When I am fighting against speciesism, I am working towards LGBTQIA+ rights. If we do not fight for animal rights, we, LGBTQIA+ people, are supporting a system that maintains our own oppression.

As a nonbinary life-long activist, veganism is not only connected to the way I perceive and understand myself in connection to the world. It is also a political tool that directly confronts a system that marginalizes Black Brown Indigenous People of Color (BBIPOC), queer and trans people, women, disabled people, immigrant workers, and low-income individuals. My answer to this problem begins with the recognition of how cisheteropatriarchal speciesism, a system that normalizes violence towards those viewed as the Other, works to uphold structures that oppress all of us who are marginalized. Queer vegans and contributors to the collection, Queer and Trans Voices, such as Julia Feliz, LoriKim Alexander, Moe Constantine, Shiri Eisner, Leah Kirts, and Patti Nyman illustrate the potential of political veganism to create a more sustainable and equitable future.

Lets break down cisheteropatriarchal speciesismits certainly a mouthful. Heteropatriarchy is a social-political system where heterosexual men have structural power over women and gender/sexual minorities. Adding cis- to heteropatriarchy denotes that the authority of cisgender heterosexual men is also entangled with transphobia and the structural power disparity and marginalization that come with it. Speciesism is a concept that assumes human superiority over nonhumans. So, cisheteropatriarchal speciesism is a term that illustrates how these power structures are not just parallel but support and perpetuate one another. One example of cisheteropatriarchal speciesism in action is how transphobia and homophobia animalize LGBTQIA+ people as the other in addition to normalizing violence against other animals Violence towards animals is part of a system that also oppresses LGBTQIA+ people.

In Leah Kirts chapter, Toward an Anti-Carceral Queer Veganism in the collection Queer and Trans Voices, she describes growing up helping on her uncles dairy farm. She now recognizes that her uncles cruelty towards the cows mirrored his abuse and exploitation of the undocumented Mexican immigrants he employed for years in what can only be described as a form of indentured servitude. The contemporary neoliberal-capitalist food system endangers all of usthe human and the nonhuman. She contends that a queer vegan anti-capitalist and anti-carceral political framework is necessary to recognize how systems that perpetuate violence towards slaughterhouse workers and nonhuman animals in factory farms are interlinked.

Kirts comment illustrated that veganism is more than a dietit is a political framework that informs activist praxis and challenges hegemonic power structures. She contends that:

Its crucial to think of veganism not as an end unto itself but as inseparable from other political movements striving for the total liberation of all marginalized bodies such as prison abolition, Black Power, queer and trans liberation, Indigenous land rights, the labor movement, and environmental justice.

This political framework, also called consistent anti-oppression, is most impactful when aligning itself with other social justice movements, such as queer liberation, workers rights, environmental justice, animal liberation, and disability justice. Scholar-activists like Anthony Nocella, Sunaura Taylor, Carol Adams, Josephine Donovan, and Pattrice Jones have explored the interconnections between veganism/vegan scholarship and movements such as eco-ability, veg(etari)an ecofeminism, and queer veganism. At the heart of each of their arguments is that vegan politics not only connects to other social justice movements but is itself integral to dismantling systems of oppression.

Sentient Medias series, Encompass Essays, illustrates this sentiment. In the inaugural essay, writer Jasmin Singer contends that she comes to veganism with an all-encompassing, overlapping approach. Her vegan advocacy work inspired by her congruent interests in LGBTQIA+ activism and AIDS awareness. She contends that in order to work towards the liberation of one group, we must actively stand against the violence of another. In Queer and Trans Voices, Singer explores the parallels between animal rights (AR) and the LGBTQIA+ movement. She explains that the overlapping issues of structural violence affecting human and nonhuman animals, especially the connections between AR and queer liberation, has become [her] lifes anchor, and [she hopes] her lifes work.

Singers work illustrates why consistent anti-oppression work is so important. As Julia Feliz explains, to fight against speciesismwe must also fight against white supremacy, environmental climate change, capitalism, and so forth. Our movement for animal rights and towards a more ethical food system must include coalition-building. A strong vegan movement is one that is anti-racist and fights against environmental racism; it is a movement that centers the voices of queer and trans-BBIPOC. To fight for animals, we need to fight against all forms of oppression and dismantle the structures, like white supremacy and cisheteropatriarchy, that are the root of this marginalization. This goes the other way as well, my LGBTQIA+ community needs to step up and realize that speciesism impacts us as well. To fight for queer liberation, we need to include animals in our activism.

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The Revolutionary Potential of Vegan Politics - Sentient Media

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