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Category : Veganism

Here’s What Meat-Eaters Really Think of Veganism, According to a New Study – ScienceAlert

Most people in the UK are committed meat eaters but for how long? My new research into the views of meat eaters found that most respondents viewed veganism as ethical in principle and good for the environment.

It seems that practical matters of taste, price, and convenience are the main barriers preventing more people from adopting veganism not disagreement with the fundamental idea.

This could have major implications for the future of the food industry as meat alternatives become tastier, cheaper and more widely available.

My survey of 1,000 UK adult men and women found that 73 percent of those surveyed considered veganism to be ethical, while 70 percent said it was good for the environment.

But 61 percent said adopting a vegan diet was not enjoyable, 77 percent said it was inconvenient, and 83 percent said it was not easy.

Other possible barriers such as health concerns and social stigma seemed not to be as important, with 60 percent considering veganism to be socially acceptable, and over half saying it was healthy.

The idea that most meat eaters agree with the principles of veganism might seem surprising to some. But other research has led to similar conclusions. One study for example, found that almost half of Americans supported a ban on slaughterhouses.

The prevalence of taste, price, and convenience as barriers to change also mirrors previous findings. One British survey found that the most common reason by far people gave for not being vegetarian is simply: "I like the taste of meat too much." The second and third most common reasons related to the high cost of meat substitutes and struggling for meal ideas.

These findings present climate and animal advocates with an interesting challenge. People are largely aware that there are good reasons to cut down their animal product consumption, but they are mostly not willing to bear the personal cost of doing so.

Decades of food behaviour research has shown us that price, taste and convenience are the three major factors driving food choices. For most people, ethics and environmental impact simply do not enter into it.

Experimental research has also shown that the act of eating meat can alter peoples' views of the morality of eating animals. One study asked participants to rate their moral concern for cows. Before answering, participants were given either nuts or beef jerky to snack on.

The researchers found that eating beef jerky actually caused participants to care less about cows. People seem not to be choosing to eat meat because they think there are good reasons to do so they are choosing to think there are good reasons because they eat meat.

In this way, the default widespread (and, let's be honest, enjoyable) behaviour of meat eating can be a barrier to clear reasoning about our food systems. How can we be expected to discuss this honestly when we have such a strong interest in reaching the conclusion that eating meat is okay?

Fortunately, things are changing. The range, quality, and affordability of vegan options has exploded. My survey was conducted in September 2018, a few months before the tremendously successful release of Greggs' vegan sausage roll.

Since then, we have seen an avalanche of high-quality affordable vegan options released in the British supermarkets, restaurants and even fast food outlets. These allow meat eaters to easily replace animal products one meal at a time.

When Subway offers a version of its meatball marinara that is compatible with your views on ethics and the environment, why would you choose the one made from an animal if the alternative tastes the same?

The widespread availability of these options means that the growing number of vegans, vegetarians and flexitarians in the UK have more choice than ever. Not only will this entice more people to try vegan options, but it will make it far easier for aspiring vegetarians and vegans to stick to their diets.

With consumer choice comes producer competition, and here we will see the magic of the market. If you think those looking to cut down their meat consumption are spoilt for choice in 2020, just wait to see the effect of these food giants racing to make their vegan offerings better and cheaper as they compete for a rapidly growing customer segment.

We may be about to witness an explosion in research to perfect plant-based meat analogues. Meanwhile, the development of real animal meat grown from stem cells without the animals is gaining pace.

While these replacements get tastier, more nutritious and cheaper over the next ten years, meat from animals will largely stay the same. It is no wonder the animal farming industry is nervous. Demand for meat and dairy is falling drastically while the market for alternatives has skyrocketed.

In the US, two major dairy producers have filed for bankruptcy in recent months, while a recent report estimated that the meat and dairy industries will collapse in the next decade.

This leaves the average meat eater with a dilemma. Most agree with the reasons for being vegan but object to the price, taste, and convenience of the alternatives.

As these alternatives get cheaper, better and more widespread, meat eaters will have to ask themselves just how good the alternatives need to be before they decide to consume in line with their values. Being one of the last people to pay for needless animal slaughter because the alternative was only "pretty good" will not be a good look in the near future.

Chris Bryant, PhD Candidate, University of Bath.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Opinions expressed in this article don't necessarily reflect the views of ScienceAlert editorial staff.

Read more:
Here's What Meat-Eaters Really Think of Veganism, According to a New Study - ScienceAlert

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

What meat eaters really think about veganism new research – The Conversation UK

Most people in the UK are committed meat eaters but for how long? My new research into the views of meat eaters found that most respondents viewed veganism as ethical in principle and good for the environment.

It seems that practical matters of taste, price, and convenience are the main barriers preventing more people from adopting veganism not disagreement with the fundamental idea. This could have major implications for the future of the food industry as meat alternatives become tastier, cheaper and more widely available.

My survey of 1,000 UK adult men and women found that 73% of those surveyed considered veganism to be ethical, while 70% said it was good for the environment. But 61% said adopting a vegan diet was not enjoyable, 77% said it was inconvenient, and 83% said it was not easy.

Other possible barriers such as health concerns and social stigma seemed not to be as important, with 60% considering veganism to be socially acceptable, and over half saying it was healthy.

The idea that most meat eaters agree with the principles of veganism might seem surprising to some. But other research has led to similar conclusions. One study for example, found that almost half of Americans supported a ban on slaughterhouses.

The prevalence of taste, price, and convenience as barriers to change also mirrors previous findings. One British survey found that the most common reason by far people gave for not being vegetarian is simply: I like the taste of meat too much. The second and third most common reasons related to the high cost of meat substitutes and struggling for meal ideas.

These findings present climate and animal advocates with an interesting challenge. People are largely aware that there are good reasons to cut down their animal product consumption, but they are mostly not willing to bear the personal cost of doing so.

Decades of food behaviour research has shown us that price, taste and convenience are the three major factors driving food choices. For most people, ethics and environmental impact simply do not enter into it.

Experimental research has also shown that the act of eating meat can alter peoples views of the morality of eating animals. One study asked participants to rate their moral concern for cows. Before answering, participants were given either nuts or beef jerky to snack on.

The researchers found that eating beef jerky actually caused participants to care less about cows. People seem not to be choosing to eat meat because they think there are good reasons to do so they are choosing to think there are good reasons because they eat meat.

In this way, the default widespread (and, lets be honest, enjoyable) behaviour of meat eating can be a barrier to clear reasoning about our food systems. How can we be expected to discuss this honestly when we have such a strong interest in reaching the conclusion that eating meat is okay?

Fortunately, things are changing. The range, quality, and affordability of vegan options has exploded. My survey was conducted in September 2018, a few months before the tremendously successful release of Greggs vegan sausage roll.

Since then, we have seen an avalanche of high-quality affordable vegan options released in the British supermarkets, restaurants and even fast food outlets. These allow meat eaters to easily replace animal products one meal at a time. When Subway offers a version of its meatball marinara that is compatible with your views on ethics and the environment, why would you choose the one made from an animal if the alternative tastes the same?

The widespread availability of these options means that the growing number of vegans, vegetarians and flexitarians in the UK have more choice than ever. Not only will this entice more people to try vegan options, but it will make it far easier for aspiring vegetarians and vegans to stick to their diets.

With consumer choice comes producer competition, and here we will see the magic of the market. If you think those looking to cut down their meat consumption are spoilt for choice in 2020, just wait to see the effect of these food giants racing to make their vegan offerings better and cheaper as they compete for a rapidly growing customer segment.

We may be about to witness an explosion in research to perfect plant-based meat analogues. Meanwhile, the development of real animal meat grown from stem cells without the animals is gaining pace.

While these replacements get tastier, more nutritious and cheaper over the next ten years, meat from animals will largely stay the same. It is no wonder the animal farming industry is nervous. Demand for meat and dairy is falling drastically while the market for alternatives has skyrocketed.

In the US, two major dairy producers have filed for bankruptcy in recent months, while a recent report estimated that the meat and dairy industries will collapse in the next decade.

This leaves the average meat eater with a dilemma. Most agree with the reasons for being vegan but object to the price, taste, and convenience of the alternatives.

As these alternatives get cheaper, better and more widespread, meat eaters will have to ask themselves just how good the alternatives need to be before they decide to consume in line with their values. Being one of the last people to pay for needless animal slaughter because the alternative was only pretty good will not be a good look in the near future.

Read more:
What meat eaters really think about veganism new research - The Conversation UK

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

These are the best vegan Instagrams that you NEED to be following – The Tab

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

12 surprising things that aren’t vegan – Inhabitat

Its hard to stick to a vegan lifestyle. It can be easy to be foiled by ingredients that just slip right by you, and these arent just in food. A surprising number of non-food items also contain animal-derived ingredients. Whats a wannabe vegan to do? Remember that drastically cutting down on animal consumption is good for the planet, even if you fall short of 100 percent. If you want to be as close to completely vegan as possible, heres a list of some surprising foods and other items that arent necessarily vegan.

The sugar industry uses bone char from slaughtered cattle to remove the color from sugar so it becomes a lovely, bright white. What about using brown sugar? Unfortunately, thats made of white sugar with molasses added to it. If you want to avoid bone char-processed sugar, buy organic, unrefined, beet or coconut sugar. You can also consult PETAs list of manufacturers that forego the bones.

Many condom manufacturers use the milk derivative casein for a smooth feel. If you can do without that texture, check out vegan-friendly brands.

Would you like some tendons with your fresh breath? Yep, those ubiquitous mints contain gelatin. Time for a Tic Tac instead, or opt for the Altoids labeled sugar-free smalls, which do not contain gelatin.

Related: 10 vegan myths, debunked

Charcoal can be made from plant or animal origins. But many of the black dyes used in tattooing are made with charcoal derived from animal bones. Other non-vegan ingredients in tattoo ink are glycerin (from animal fat), gelatin and shellac (made from crushed beetles). If vegan ink is important to you, consult this international list of vegan-friendly tattoo artists.

Now, its time for something really gross. Some companies use isinglass, or fish bladders, to clarify their apple juice.

Animal tendons and sinews find their way into a lot of food and non-food products. The outer layers of paintball capsules are usually made of gelatin.

Dryer sheets are designed to fight static electricity and make clothes soft and lint-resistant. But what keeps the sheets from drying out? In some cases, animal fat. Urban Vegan assembled a list of vegan alternatives, if you happen to use dryer sheets. Alternatively, you can also reduce your waste by opting to use wool dryer balls.

Artists and anybody who uses makeup might wonder, where did the hairs in my brush come from? They might be synthetic, or they might be from some poor pig, squirrel, sable or Siberian weasel. Artists, consult this list of cruelty-free brushes, and heres a list of vegan makeup brushes.

Related: The pros and cons of going vegan

In other art supply news, crayons contain stearic acid. This ingredient occurs naturally in plants and animals. But its often animal-derived, a slaughterhouse byproduct. Crayons are one of many products that contain stearic acid, including soaps, cosmetics, candles, lubricants, chewing gum and hairspray. If you prefer your crayons vegan, check out these triangular ones made by Melissa and Doug.

Newer vegans might not have realized this yet, but traditional Worcestershire sauce contains anchovies. Instead, make your own or buy this vegan, organic Worcestershire sauce from trusted brand, Annies.

If youre vegan, you probably already know that many regular cheeses arent even vegetarian, because they contain rennet, enzymes produced in bovine stomachs that help cheese curdle. But did you know many soy cheeses arent vegan? They often contain casein, which seems really weird, because why would you even want soy cheese if you werent vegan?

Vegans who live in or are visiting Britain arent thrilled to handle the 5 notes, which contain tallow, an animal fat derivative. It is used to make the bills anti-static and less slippery. British vegans and vegetarians have been protesting since the new notes were introduced in 2016. This month, a British employment judge ruled that the Equality Act should also apply to people who sincerely believe in ethical veganism. How an indirect discrimination case will affect the bank notes is still to be seen.

Could be beef tallow, could be chicken fat most plastic bags use some type of animal fat as slip agents to prevent bags from sticking together. One more good reason for banning plastic bags!

Images via Shutterstock

View original post here:
12 surprising things that aren't vegan - Inhabitat

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Lewis Hamilton became a vegan to ‘feel great’ and save animals – FOX 11 and FOX 41

Lewis Hamilton switched to a vegan diet to to save animals and feel great.

The Formula 1 champion who was named Person of the Year by animal rights organization PETA in 2018 has opened up about the positive impacts following a diet that is meat and dairy-free and without other animal-derived products has had on his performance, energy levels and the overall health of his gut.

He told the new issue of GQ Hype magazine: Ultimately, you want to feel great.

You want to have energy, to be consistent.

You dont want to have the big oscillations and highs and lows in your energy levels.

Veganism has eradicated that.

When I was 22, it was raw talent.

Youve got an abundance of energy, youre fit, there are no aches and pains

But Im always looking at how I can improve.

Can my eyesight be better? Can my reactions be improved? Are there new ways of testing my reactions?

The ergonomics in the car how can I make everything simpler?

Theres a multitude of things and Im always trying to raise the bar.

One of the things was my sleeping pattern and not feeling right in the stomach.

Your gut is your second brain.

The 35-year-old motor sportsman added that non-vegans are missing out.

He said: Were taught to drink milk and eat meat for protein and I started looking into other areas of research around all this.

The first thing was, whats happening to the animals? Secondly, the impact it can have on your body.

Thats a free advantage Im going to take.

If no one else wants it, well thats their loss.

Meanwhile, the British star quipped that he needs to pay Finnish racing driver Kimi Raikkonen, 40, to remain in F1 so hes not the oldest, but admitted that he feels as young as ever and fitter than ever, though he accepts that his fitness levels are bound to dwindle in years to come.

When the interviewer suggested hes an elder statesman, he said: No, I am. I need to start paying Kimi [Raikkonen] to stay so Im not the oldest.

Luckily, I think hes going to keep going.

I dont feel old at all.

I feel as young as ever.

I feel fit, fitter than ever.

Everything just works better now, with the experience I have.

I dont even think its harder to stay physically in shape, although Im sure that will inevitably tail off at some point.

See the full interview available online now via GQ HYPE http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/cars/article/lewis-hamilton-interview-2020

FOX41 YakimaeFOX11 TriCities

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Lewis Hamilton became a vegan to 'feel great' and save animals - FOX 11 and FOX 41

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Going vegan? Use this 12-week daily planner – Treehugger

It contains all the nutritional info, recipes, and moral support you'll need for a big dietary transition.

Have you ever wanted to go vegan, but didn't know where or how to start? Perhaps this new book could help you. Written by Michelle Neff, it is called Going Vegan: Your Daily Planner (Simon & Schuster, 2019), and it offers a detailed guide to making the transition from meat to meatless.

The book is divided into two parts. The first one delves into vegan health and nutrition, how to shop for vegan ingredients, and strategies for long-term success. The second one is the planner portion of the book, which has 12 weeks' worth of a daily diet plan, recipes, and a section for tracking personal results. A typical day looks like this:

I was impressed by the in-depth discussion of vegan health, presented at the beginning of the book. Neff addresses the problem of many wannabe vegans failing to get sufficient nutrients, and then giving up because they feel crummy.

"Some well-meaning people stop consuming milk, eggs, and dairy, but end up eating nothing but French fries, chips and salsa, or next to nothing at all, then wonder why they feel tired all the time... They blame it on veganism, with unfounded claims that they aren't getting enough protein, and then switch back to eating beef and cheese. Of course, it's not lack of protein that is getting these unhealthy vegans down; it's a complete lack of all nutrients."

It's clear that Going Vegan is designed to avoid this nutrient depletion. The meals are a well-balanced selection of grains, vegetables, and plant-based proteins, presented in recipes that sound absolutely delicious and easy to make. Neff doesn't shy away from discussing bloating, gas, cravings (and occasional failures), and criticism or judgement from non-vegans. The more open discussion about these factors, the more likely your long-term success.

Neff has good advice for figuring out where to start one's vegan journey. People are often told to give up meat first, followed by dairy, but this doesn't always make sense: "Dairy, and cheese in particular, is often the most difficult food to eliminate from your diet. This is a good argument for gradually eliminating it first rather than last, as it may take the longest to wean you off of it." She discusses the 'middle path' approach to veganism, which pushes meat to the side of the plate and makes it less of a central focus, more of a side dish.

The appeal of this 12-week meal planner is that it exposes new vegans to a broad range of healthy recipes right off the bat, preventing them from getting stuck in a rut that might be unhealthy, repetitive, and discouraging. If you follow it precisely, you'll be confident in the kitchen within three months and more likely to stick with veganism for life.

You can find the planner on Amazon or from other booksellers.

It contains all the nutritional info, recipes, and moral support you'll need for a big dietary transition.

Original post:
Going vegan? Use this 12-week daily planner - Treehugger

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Rocker Brian May Would Have Tried Veganism Sooner – If He Realized How Delicious It Is – Plant Based News

Brian May is loving Veganuary (Photo:Bill Ingalls)

Brian May has revealed that he is loving the food he's been able to eat during Veganuary - and would have tried it sooner if he'd realized how delicious a plant-based diet can be.

The Queen guitarist, who is currently touring in Japan, is a longtime vegetarian and animal advocate, who decided to trial a plant-based diet because he was 'bothered' by campaigners for some animals while eating animal-derived food.

Posting on Instagram, the musician shared a picture of his breakfast, and wrote: "Vegan breakfast for a Big Day! You know, I think if I'd realized how easy Veganuary was going to be, I'd have done it earlier.

"I was under the impression I was going to be 'giving things up', but it seems to be an opportunity to eat more of the things I really love!"

The star revealed he'd be doing Veganuary 2020 last month, sharing the news with his 2.1 million Instagram followers, posting a picture of himself brandishing Veganuary's vegan guide.

He said: "Starting on the first of January I, this coming year I will be doing VEGANUARY. Which means I will eat only vegan food for that month.

"If any of you folks out there are hovering on the edge out there and want to join me too, I'd be delighted. We can mutually support each other! I figured this book is a good place to start.

"My reasons? 1) to lessen the suffering of animals. 2) To lessen the load on our groaning planet. 3) for my health. And...as an animal campaigner, it has been bothering me for a while that I still eat animal-derived food, that has caused indignity and pain to a non-human animal."

Go here to read the rest:
Rocker Brian May Would Have Tried Veganism Sooner - If He Realized How Delicious It Is - Plant Based News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Neon Tiger, a vegan cocktail bar set in the year 2048, is coming to King Street this spring – Charleston City Paper

The flickering outline of a roaring tiger stares out from a black screen. The neon orange and pink pulsates, like a power line is fighting to fuel the light. "It's a glitch in the Matrix," says John Adamson of his new vegan cocktail concept Neon Tiger. "It doesn't adhere to the rules of the Matrix."

Adamson explains that his new restaurant will be set in the year 2048 when it opens at 654 King St. (formerly Juliet) in early spring. Less whimsy and more end times, this is the world Adamson believes we will have to grapple with if humans continue to kill, consume, and imprison animals.

The restaurant will be entirely plant-based, with locally sourced booze, no cans or bottles, and as little waste as possible. Prolific Toronoto-based activist and vegan chef Doug McNish serves as Neon Tiger's consultant.

"We have pretty grand plans," says Adamson. Neon Tiger will be a B Corp, an entity that functions as a business while also meeting standards for social responsibility and sustainability. "It's all about education, for me as an activist, you have to play to your strengths and my strength is creating and designing restaurant concepts."

Adamson has a been a vegan for two-and-a-half years. The day he decided to change his way of life, Adamson says he was ready to turn his restaurant, The Rarebit, into a vegan-only eatery. "There would be no greater statement for the movement," he says. But it wasn't practical, so the restaurateur decided to sell his popular King Street joint and put money toward a new venture. Serendipitously, Neon Tiger's landlord is also a vegan.

"Designing those spaces [Rarebit and The Americano] from my head, it's just what I enjoy. This one happens to be more important than any I've ever done."

Adamson is ready for keyboard warriors to attack his animal-free restaurant the outspoken activist is used to getting flack from meat eaters. "The funny thing, well it's not funny, but the interesting thing about veganism is you have so many people who want to fight you on it, but you are fighting for them. Animal liberation is human liberation."

He says his goal since becoming vegan was to "create a space for people to have a cruelty free meal." The response from fellow vegans in the hospitality industry has been great, says Adamson. Turns out there are plenty of front and back of house workers who desire an animal-free work place, but haven't been able to pursue this goal and still keep a roof over their heads.

If you don't buy into the whole "veganism will save the world" thing, that's OK says Adamson. "You only need about 10 or 15 percent of the population think about any movement in history. We're just racing for that 10 percent."

According to a Forbes analysis in 2018 based on a Science mag report, "Since livestock production is the single largest contributor of emissions around the globe (more than planes, trains and cars combined), removing it from out food system could allow the planet to regenerate. Raising animals for food is also the largest contributor to wildlife extinction around the world."

Whether you're a vegan, on the fence, or an adamant consumer of animal products, Adamson hopes you'll check out Neon Tiger. It will be open nightly until 2 a.m. with a "sexy, lounge-y feel" that also happens to be mid apocalypse themed.

"The idea is in 2048 the only tiger youll have will be representations of these animals. It also brings that human element it's like a slight to humanity of course we'd only be left with neon ... It's a responsibility we had that we completely neglected and failed."

Here is the original post:
Neon Tiger, a vegan cocktail bar set in the year 2048, is coming to King Street this spring - Charleston City Paper

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

What is The Game Changers about? Why everyone is talking about the vegan documentary – RadioTimes

In case you hadnt noticed, theres been a lot of discussion in recent times about veganism, its nutritional benefits and environmental advantages. In this Netflix documentary, several world-famous athletes and bodybuilders have their say

See below for everything you need to know about Netflixs The Game Changers

The documentary follows British UFC fighter James Wilks as he travels around the world to discover the optimal diet for human performance, particularly looking into the benefits of a plant-based diet. Along the way, he interviews scientists, special ops soldiers, action stars and some of the biggest names in sport.

The Game Changers makes some pretty big claims, suggesting that a plant-based diet is actually better for improving performance and strength than eating meat.

Its not one set of dietary guidelines for improving your performance as an athlete, another one for reversing heart disease, reversing diabetes, said Dr Dean Ornish.Its the same for all of them.

The documentary also shows several burly world-class athletes who have achieved astonishing feats which they attribute to a plant-based diet.

When I made the switch to a plant-based diet, I qualified for my third Olympic team, I broke two American records, said weightlifter Kendrick Farris.I was like man, I should have done this a long while ago!

During the film, Wilks discovers that the Roman gladiators were mostly vegetarian, and after taking part in a seven-day vegan challenge New York firefighters find they had apparently reduced cholesterol and blood pressure.

It has also hit the headlines recently as the documentary allegedly convinced the CEO of Greggs to turn vegan, surely guaranteeing that vegan sausage rolls are here to stay (sorry Piers Morgan).

The documentary is available to watch now on Netflix. You can also watch The Game Changers on Amazon.

Appropriately for a documentary about strength, the film features several heavyweight action stars and athletes.

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jackie Chan, Lewis Hamilton, Novak Djokovic and James Cameron all feature to discuss the ideal diet for peak human strength and performance.

The Game Changes is on Netflix now.

Excerpt from:
What is The Game Changers about? Why everyone is talking about the vegan documentary - RadioTimes

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

How Much Does it Really Cost to Be a Vegan? – VEGWORLD Magazine

A vegan lifestyle has a reputation for being expensive, but thanks to Joybirds research, the cost of following a vegan diet doesn't have to break the bank.

The Cost of a Vegan Diet vs a Non-Vegan Diet

Health and wellness are often the first things that come to mind when you hear the word resolution, especially this time of year. The Joybird team spent time exploring some of the most popular trends in diet and exercise, including the potential benefits of a vegan diet, in which a person does not consume any animal products (a.k.a. No dairy, eggs, meat, etc.). However, veganism has a reputation for being expensive, and people are often discouraged by the potential price before they even give it a shot. So, Joybird shares their exploration of how much more expensive a vegan diet is versus a non-vegan diet.

The Research

The Joybird team collected prices from local online groceries in every state to find the average cost of 10 common food items that appear on weekly grocery lists outside of produce, along with their vegan substitutes. They compared the total average cost for the 10 non-vegan and comparable vegan items to calculate the cost difference between the two grocery lists in each state. They even included items that would need a substitute, so produce wasnt included in the study.

The non-vegan items in the study include Greek yogurt, ground beef patties, shredded mozzarella cheese, ice cream, spreadable butter, chicken nuggets, coffee creamer, turkey slices, whole milk, and Italian sausage. The vegan items include dairy-free yogurt, meat-free burger patties, dairy-free shredded mozzarella cheese, non-dairy ice cream, buttery spread, meat-free chicken nuggets, almond milk coffee creamer, veggie turkey slices, almond milk, and tofurkey Italian sausage.

The prices come from Walmart groceries in up to 10 zip codes in each state, in both urban and rural areas in each state. The numbers reflect prices only, taken from the retailers, and do not include any additional taxes or fees that may be incurred. Pricing data was, unfortunately, unavailable for Hawaii.

What They Found

The national average difference between the vegan and non-vegan food items came in at $12.02. 22 states difference fell above the national average, with the rest falling below.

The state with the largest cost difference between the vegan and non-vegan items is Alaska with an average difference of $14.84. The next four states with the largest difference in cost are Arkansas ($14.53), Arizona ($14.31), Michigan ($13.57), and Wyoming ($13.23).

The state with the smallest cost difference between the vegan and non-vegan items is Louisiana with an average difference of $9.82. The next four states with the smallest difference in cost are Massachusetts ($10.52), Nevada ($10.60), New Hampshire ($10.66), and California ($10.68). It was most surprising to see a state like California in the bottom 5 since theyre often known for higher than average prices, but its likely that they have a larger vegan population, so they need to cater to that accordingly.

The Joybird team also compared the average cost difference in each U.S. region. The Northeast has the smallest difference in price in vegan and non-vegan items with an average of $11.41. The Midwest and the West tied for the most expensive, with a difference of $12.26, which is still only slightly higher than the national average.

You can see the details of how your states average costs for non-vegan and vegan food items compare to the rest of the country in the chart below.

Conclusion

Overall, there ended up being no great difference in cost between the non-vegan and vegan food items, showing you dont have to break the bank to adopt a healthier eating plan!

Whether you choose to try out a vegan or vegetarian diet in the New Year or opt for a meat-friendly meal plan instead, your food choices should be a reflection of who you are and what you believe in.

Thank you @Joybird for contributing this article! Find the source here: https://joybird.com/blog/cost-to-be-a-vegan/

Read more:
How Much Does it Really Cost to Be a Vegan? - VEGWORLD Magazine

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson


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