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Category : Veganism

5 Tips on How to Go Vegan in College – VegNews

Although delivery pizzas, all-nighters, and tight budgets characterize college, its also an ideal opportunity to develop lifelong healthy habits. This four-year incubation period is the time to focus on becoming the best version of yourself. Despite restricted dining hall options or roommates who seem to live off instant beef-flavored ramen and microwaved mac and cheese, going vegan on campus is totally doable. Become your best self not just through the higher education youre paying for, but through your lifestyle as well. Here are five tried-and-true steps to help you easily go vegan on (and off) campus.

1. Do your researchBefore you toss out your stash of animal-based convenience foods, it is crucial to find your why. Most people who jump into veganism just because its trendy arent able to stick to the lifestyle. There are many reasons to go vegan. Taking some time to research the benefits will allow you to further educate yourself on the culture and ensure that you make the change for good. Although there is an abundance of resources to motivate your journey, we highly recommend starting with documentaries What the Health or The Game Changers, or the Animal Rights Foundation of Floridas 2011 presentation, 101 Reasons to Go Vegan. All harness science-backed facts to promote the concept of veganism. We promise, all of these resources are far more entertaining than reading another textbook. College kids get enough of that already.

2. Take baby stepsGoing vegan can be a lengthy transition, not an instant transformation. Dont be discouraged if you hit some road bumps on your journey. College is a time full of distractions and temptations; if you drop the ball one night and indulge in some non-vegan dining hall cookies, dont beat yourself up. If it takes the entirety of your freshman year to commit, thats fine. When facing a setback, remind yourself of your why, and lean into it. Every progression is different, and that is a-okay. Pro tip: Next time youre eyeing those dining hall cookies, grab a box of Oreos from your schools convenience store instead. Also, check out these accidentally vegan snacks so you can stock up!

3. Get creative in the dining hallGone are the days of mystery-meat-stocked cafeterias. Today, 70 percent of colleges now offer at least one vegan option daily. If your school lands in that minority percentile, you just might have to be a little creative. A typical vegan night at the dining hall may include spinach and edamame from the salad bar, rice and beans from the Mexican station, and cooked vegetables from the hot food section. Sure, these flavors may not complement each other precisely, but lets be real here; youre eating college cafeteria foodomnivore or otherwise, its time to lower the bar.

4. Treat yoself to off-campus foodVegan or not, we all need a break from the monotony of the dining hall. In this day and age, most urban sprawls offer delectable vegan-friendly options, and most cities have at least a few vegan restaurants. To track down your new favorite to-go order, cross-reference HappyCow and Yelp for reviews and little-known vegan options. These tools are invaluable for college towns or suburban areas. You may have never discovered that one coffee shop that serves vegan cupcakes while living in your on-campus bubble! Another option is to search hashtags on Instagram. Type in #vegan(yourtown) for local hidden gems. For example, for all of you at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, check out the pastries behind the #veganchapelhill hashtag!

5. Stay accountableUpon entering college, making new friends seems daunting. Fear not! The vegan niche may actually speed the process. Its easy to meet other vegans through food clubs, vegan restaurants, or even in the dining hall. Food is one of the easiest topics to bond over, because who wouldnt want to grab a bite after a long day of class? Having vegan friends to hold you accountableand make it funis key to the longevity of your new plant-based lifestyle. While working on those best-friends-forever bonds, keep yourself accountable by creating a food-based Instagram (or go in the direction of ethical fashionyou will have a style-savvy, locked-in audience immediately). Devoting a public space to share your culinary creations, edible adventures, or vegan leather thrift store jacket can help increase your vegan confidence. Not bogged down with homework? Take it to the next level and create a vegan YouTube channel or blog with easy-to-use site-building tools. Whether an Instagram account, website, or YouTube channel is up your creative alley, expressing your vegan passions with others is a sure way to stay accountable.

Not sure if youre going back to campus for Fall 2020? Check out these budget-friendly meals you can master at home while taking courses online. If youre fortunate, perhaps your parents will spring some cash for groceriesand you can veganize them in the process!

Caroline Hughes is an honors student at Texas Christian University obtaining a Strategic Communication degree with a minor in Business.

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5 Tips on How to Go Vegan in College - VegNews

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9 Vegan Podcasts You Need to Subscribe to – VegNews

Social distancing can be tough, especially if you live alone. If youre craving some screen-free content to keep your mind occupied, a solid vegan podcast can turn into your new best friend (at least until its safe to reunite with our old ones, that is). From light-hearted roving conversations about plant-based food and pop culture to deep discussions on ethics and health, these nine vegan podcasts will keep you company and keep you connected to the outside world.

1. The Chickpeeps PodcastFans of vegan actress Evanna Lynch will love binge-listening to the last two seasons of this Brit-based podcast. Lynch is joined by her friends Momo, Robbie, and Tylor throughout the show as they discuss vegan philosophy, contrasting opinions, and challenges theyve faced in the vegan space. Episodes often feature a guest interview with a vegan activist, entrepreneur, or changemaker such as the duo behind the popular BOSH! food blog and cookbook series, Dr. Melanie Joy, and Katie Tostevin-Hobbs of World Animal Protection. Listeners can sport their fandom by heading over to the podcast shop and purchasing a tee or hoodie emblazoned with Lynchs signature signoff, Stay spangly and take your B12!

2. The Rich Roll PodcastThe guest list sometimes strays from plant-based changemakers, but the host is as vegan as they come. Ultraman Rich Roll is a master interviewer and books the most awe-inspiring guests. Those accomplished enough to grace the microphone of the Rich Roll podcast will enrapture you for the two-hour-plus duration of the show. Past vegan guests include tough-as-nails Navy Seal David Goggins, ultrarunner Fiona Oakes, punk rocker John Joseph, Dr. Michael Greger, and more. Go for a long walk or run and settle in for some major plant-based motivation.

3. Our Hen House Go deep into the ethical issues surrounding the vegan and animal rights movements with co-hosts Jasmin Singer (VegNews Senior Online Features Editor) and animal law professor Mariann Sullivan. The powerhouse activist duo touch on the latest news, issues, and triumphs of the vegan world, always complemented with a guest interview. Youll hear from the vegan greats such as Dr. Neal Barnard and Tofurky founder Seth Tibbot, but youll also discover advocates who typically fly under the radar such as Kelly Holt and Dan McKernan of Animal Planets Saved by the Barn. Finally, this podcast is immaculately consistent. No seasonal breaks or oops, we missed an episode, heres a flashback. Singer and Sullivan ensure their audience receives new content every single week. Pro-tip: Our Hen House also produces the monthly Animal Law Podcast, passionately hosted by Sullivan.

4. No Meat Athlete PodcastWhat began as a running podcast in 2014 has dipped into a number of topics throughout the yearsfrom vegan parenting to habit change. Co-hosts Matt Frasier and Doug Haywith occasional appearances by Olympian Julia Murray and No Meat Athlete team member Matt Tullmanoften fly solo on the show and attempt to offer tips on the topic at hand. Its a lighthearted, family-friendly conversation that youll soon feel a part of. Each week, look forward to updates on Matts 11-year-old soccer star, Dougs latest garden adventures and ultramarathon goals, helpful tips on running and whole food nutrition, and a few good tangents.

5. The Bearded VegansBefore you keep scrolling, know that this show is not about cruelty-free beard care. Co-hosts Andy Tabar and Paul Steller go beyond vegan 101 to explore topics that will make the most woke vegan put their thinking cap on. Conversations drag listeners down into that slightly squirmy ethical grey area and give your brain a workout. Past episodes mull over Should we celebrate Joaquin Phoenixs Oscar Speech? Why misanthropy is bad for veganism, Is it time to retire Meat is Murder? and other opinions you felt so sure about until you were presented with all the arguments. The guys throw in some film and restaurant reviews for short breaks in these intellectually stimulating ethical conversations. You may find that you dont always agree with them, but their personalities will make you want to press play every single week.

6. The Switch4Good PodcastElucidate yourself with this groundbreaking variety show on everything from health to ethical fashion. Co-hosts Olympian Dotsie Bausch and actress/activist Alexandra Paul hold meaningful conversations with everyone from plant-based doctors to professional athletes, celebrities to chefs. Recent guests include Brooklyn Burroughs President Eric Adams, Adrian Velarde of Desserto (the vegan cactus leather brand), and Ironman Brendan Brazier. The hour-long show is part self-help, part entertainment, and one hundred percent engaging.

7. Vegan AbbatoireCelebrity father/daughter duo Kevin and Harley Quinn Smith are quarantining together, and this new vegan podcast is the result of all that creative energy simmering under one roof. The episodes are laidback and tangential as the Smiths fill the first part of the show with mild banter between father and daughter, then the pair shifts to focus on the guest interview. The show has only been rolling for a little over a month, but the variety of guests spans from Farm Sanctuary founder Gene Bower to Ultraman Rich Roll to our very own Senior News Editor Anna Starostinetskaya. In typical Smith fashion, its quirky, but sometimes the right sense of quirk makes the biggest fans.

8. Vegan Business TalkLooking to launch your own vegan business, or curious about how its done? Journalist, public relations specialist, and business coach Katrina Fox has created a weekly podcast to show you how. Each episode pursues the start-to-finish journeys of successful plant-based entrepreneurs and offers insights on specific tactics one can utilize to create a better business. Recent guests include Loui Blake, serial entrepreneur and award-winning vegan marketer; Grace Regan of UK-based curry house SpiceBox; and San Dennigan, founder of the Strong Roots vegan frozen food brand.

9. Veggie Doctor RadioDr. Yami Cazorla-Lancaster, DO, MPH (aka Dr. Yami) is the vegan pediatrician we wish we had growing up. While geared towards parents, we can all learn more about health, nutrition, habit change, and psychology from this affable doc. Some episodes feature guests while others she flys solo, but the content is always engaging, educational, and entertaining. Recent favorites include episode 107/107b How to Eat More Plants Without Hating Your Life with Talia Pollock/How to Make 5 Familiar American and Kid-Friendly Dinner Plant-Based, episode 106 Gut Motility and Your Health with Dr. Supriya Rao, and episode 102 How Understanding Generations Can Add More Value to Your Life. Get the whole family involved and learn together every Sunday!

Tanya Flink is a Digital Editor at VegNews as well as a writer and runner living in Orange County, CA.

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9 Vegan Podcasts You Need to Subscribe to - VegNews

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Rising Adoption of Veganism Due to Alarming Prevalence of Zoonotic Diseases to Bring Considerable Growth Opportunities for Yellow Pea Protein Market,…

ALBANY, N.Y., Aug. 11, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --The ascending health and environment-related concerns may bring expanding growth for the yellow pea protein market throughout the forecast period of 2020-2030. In addition, the growing influence of yellow pea protein in the pet industry is adding extra stars of growth. The high nutritional properties and low-fat content make yellow pea protein a perfect addition to pet food. Therefore, this aspect may help in raising the growth graph of the yellow pea protein market during the forecast period of 2020-2030.

The analysts at Transparency Market Research (TMR), after conducting extensive research on every growth parameter, have prophesied the global yellow pea protein market to expand at a healthy CAGR of 6.1 percent through the forecast period of 2020-2030. The global yellow pea protein market is anticipated at ~US$ 1.7 bn by the end of 2020 and is extrapolated to reach ~US$ 3.1 bn by 2030.

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The swelling number of consumers switching to plant-based food products may serve as a prominent growth generator for the yellow pea protein market. The growing number of new entrants introducing food products laced with yellow pea protein may bring tremendous growth opportunities for the yellow pea protein market between 2020 and 2030.

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Yellow Pea Protein Market: Major Findings

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Yellow Pea Protein Market: Growth Dimensions

The shifting preference of people to a plant-based diet for losing weight on the back of the high prevalence of disorders associated with obesity may bring efficient growth for the yellow pea protein market. The use of multiple channels for the distribution of products by varied channels may sow the seeds of growth across the yellow pea protein market.

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Is COVID-19 a Boon or Bane for Yellow Pea Protein Market?

Every sector across the globe has been negatively affected by the lockdowns implemented by numerous countries on the grounds of the COVID-19 outbreak. The yellow pea protein market has also been affected minimally due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Therefore, disturbance in the supply chain may turn out to be a growth dampener.

However, the rising prevalence of zoonotic diseases like COVID-19 is leading to a switch in food preferences. A large populace is now moving toward vegetarianism and thus, this aspect may serve as a beneficial growth factor for the yellow pea protein market.

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Textured Pea Protein Market- The increasing demand for plant-based meat protein has resulted in rise in demand for textured pea protein products, thus propelling the growth of the textured pea protein market. Due to its functional properties and innovation in textured pea protein such as isolation of starch fiber to mimic meaty texture, manufacturer are moving from soy to textured pea protein products. Textured pea protein has functional benefits, particularly in gluten free applications, which include gelation, and increased browning and water holding.

Organic Pea Protein Market- The growing prevalence of organic pea proteins is primarily attributed to its positive water and fatbinding capabilities, gelation and emulsification properties, nutritional values, and texture. Food manufacturers are exploring ways for integrating organic pea protein as a unique protein solution contributing to the desired texture/ functionality in food and beverages. All these factors are boosting the growth of the organic pea protein market.

Pea Protein Market- Pea protein has a variety of application in the food and beverage industry. It is rich in essential nutrients and has an advantage of functional characteristics with a large amount of amino acids. They are segmented into concentrates, isolates and textured pea depending on their protein content. They are used at meat extender, substitutes and analogs. The global pea protein market is anticipated to witness a dramatic growth in its demand on account of rising concern for health and wellness among the consumers in all corners of the world.

Pea Protein Nuggets Market- Proteins are added in many food products as they provide a wide range of benefits such as they help with aging and muscle loss, repair the cells of the body, aid in recovering and also in curbing the appetite and others. Nowadays, Pea proteins are gaining popularity and the pea protein nuggets market is observing growth as they add nutrients to the products and help to keep the gluten free items together. Pea protein nuggets are sustainably produced from conventional, non-genetically modified yellow peas that have 70% of protein content and offer functional benefits.

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Transparency Market Research is a global market intelligence company, providing global business information reports and services. Our exclusive blend of quantitative forecasting and trends analysis provides forward-looking insight for thousands of decision makers. Our experienced team of analysts, researchers, and consultants use proprietary data sources and various tools and techniques to gather and analyze information.

Our data repository is continuously updated and revised by a team of research experts, so that it always reflects the latest trends and information. With a broad research and analysis capability, Transparency Market Research employs rigorous primary and secondary research techniques in developing distinctive data sets and research material for business reports.

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Rising Adoption of Veganism Due to Alarming Prevalence of Zoonotic Diseases to Bring Considerable Growth Opportunities for Yellow Pea Protein Market,...

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Man sparks workplace controversy with reaction to co-workers vegan-only club: Petty and ridiculous – Yahoo Sports

A man is stirring major internet controversy after sharing his response to his co-workers vegan dining club.

The frustrated employee shared his dilemma in Reddits AITA (Am I The A******) forum. Writing under the username Unlucky_Sound_6040, he explained why he decided to start a meat-eaters-only club at work.

After colleagues created an exclusive vegans-only club at work, I created a meat-eaters-only club at work. Am I the a******? the user asked.

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Unlucky_Sound_6040 wrote that his office issue began with a co-worker named Jane. Several months ago, she started a dining club for vegans at the company.

According to the Redditor, no one took issue with the club at first. But, after Jane approved her club with the companys human resources department, some employees began to complain.

In the [clubs mission] statement, which passed with HR, one of the rules stated that only vegans, vegetarians, and pescatarians will be welcome, and that all dinner options will be vegan, the user wrote. This rubbed some of us the work way, since it was clearly exclusionary and divisive.

The Redditor added that his workplace soon became divided, with many employees feeling left out. Thats why he and a group of co-workers decided to start the Burger and Steak Club.

The new club, which excluded vegans and vegetarians, also managed to pass through the companys HR approval process. However, many members of vegan club complained in response.

[They said] that our club was exclusionary, offensive to their lifestyle, and that eating meat (as opposed to not eating meat) was not a lifestyle, the user wrote.

Divisions grew deep in the office. Unlucky_Sound_6040 wrote that his relationship with Jane, who formed the vegan club, was significantly damaged.

Despite my prior friendship with Jane, she now refuses to talk to me and is only spending time with her club members, he wrote.

The post drew more than 1,500 comments, with Reddit users taking strong stances on the issue. Many argued that the vegan club should have included all employees.

Jane is why people dont like vegans, one user wrote.

It is incredibly stupid to exclude non-vegans since introducing omnivores to delicious plant-based food is a good way to get them to be more open to veganism, another argued.

Others said the meat-eaters were in the wrong, since their club was excluding a group that, in general, has a tougher time finding enjoyable meals.

Nobody is going to come eat burgers and steak if they arent meat-eaters, one user wrote. Its understandable that vegans/vegetarians would want a safe space.

A few commenters dismissed the controversy altogether though. One called the issue petty and ridiculous.

Everyone is being so unbelievably petty here, another user concluded.

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Man sparks workplace controversy with reaction to co-workers vegan-only club: Petty and ridiculous - Yahoo Sports

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‘Nothing seemed normal anymore, including eating meat’: why sales of vegan products have spiked – Telegraph.co.uk

In Kent, Joanna Earle, 36, has gradually reduced animal products for the past year. Though going fully vegan was appealing, Earle says her lifestyle prevented it. When eating at restaurants or on-the-go work lunches, it was tough. With these elements removed, Earle found sticking to a vegan diet easier.

I feel great and I dont think I will [go back to animal products], says Earle. I love all the delicious meals and plant-based foods I make, so I dont feel like Im missing out on nutrients.

Also in Kent, John Ellis, 51, cut out meat after being diagnosed with heart disease at the onset of lockdown, and having three stents fitted.

Nothing seemed normal anymore, including eating meat. Ellis prefers fruits and vegetables (and still eats fish) to processed vegan options, but is developing a taste and appreciation for the alternatives. He doesnt expect to go back to meat, but isnt putting pressure on himself.

Sreedhar Krishna, an NHS consultant dermatologist from south London, says health reasons prompted his switch to a diet consisting solely of vegan meal replacement shakes. A bit extreme, I know, he concedes. He says during lockdown his hospital didnt need him as part of their pandemic response, so he had a rare holiday.

I felt refreshed and took some time to reflect on my lifestyle, Krishna explains. With family members having died from presumed cardiac issues in their 30s and 40s, I thought something had to change.

No longer were unhealthy pastries and soft drinks, scoffed down between patients, appealing. I had known this for a while, but it was only with the time away from work that the penny dropped that I had to act.

In London, Amelie Barrau, 33, struggled to find ingredients in local supermarkets at the beginning of lockdown. As a local butcher quickly ran out of stock, a greengrocer and organic shop became the only options. They primarily offered plant-based food, and the lack of queues appealed. Barrau has switched to a 90 per cent plant-based diet.

Barrau, who feels the best Ive felt in years, was thinking about it since before lockdown, for health and animal welfare reasons. She began to educate herself with her increased spare time, and says the pandemic has definitely highlighted the many issues behind the intensification of farming.

This brings up a factor that has long been known among experts but seldom discussed in wider society: that our hunger for meat, and the way its produced, is considered a vector for disease. As Valentina Rizzi of the European Food Safety Authority said in May: The majority of emerging new infections in humans in the last 10 years really come from animals or food of animal origin.

It was likely true of Sars and Mers, and seems to be the case for Covid-19. Additionally, several large outbreaks around the world have been linked to meat processing plants. The UN, citing links between zoonotic infections and the current animal production system, is insisting on a rethink of farming practices.

The past few years have seen a significant rise in veganism, from an estimated 150,000 in 2006 to 600,000 in 2018. As health, environmental and animal welfare issues become clearer, many more are attempting to cut down their meat and dairy intake, if only for a few days a week. The lockdown has changed the way we eat in many ways perhaps providing the plant-based movement with a further shot in the arm will eventually be seen asthe most significant.

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'Nothing seemed normal anymore, including eating meat': why sales of vegan products have spiked - Telegraph.co.uk

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

How veganism and other plant-based diets are becoming mainstream – Iowa State Daily

Veganism is one of many popular diets available to people looking to try a new diet.

Eating less meat and more plants are becoming an increasing topic of conversation.

People all over the country are constantly talking about the health benefits of becoming vegan and plant-based.Even though the diets are used interchangeably, they are very different from each other.

Veganism is a practice that stays away from animal products of any kind, including items such as makeup, hair products, clothing and furniture; plant-based diets do not have an issue with buying animal-based products and are more concerned about the health benefits from eating fruits and vegetables.

The awareness of the term veganism and plant-based is growing;40 percent of Americans are making an effort to consumemore plant-based foods on a daily diet.

It's popular today because a lot of consumers are reading about how meat production affects the environment and has led, among other things, to climate change, all true but there are many nuances, said Smaranda Andrews, assistant teaching professor in food and nutrition sciences at Iowa State.

Even though the popularity of veganism and plant-based diets has been growing, people tend to forget many people throughout history have eaten plant-based diets. In history, some families could not afford meat and treated it as a luxury.

Throughout history, humans ate mainly plant-based diets, Andrews said. Meat was always a luxury and it still is for the vast majority of people on this planet. Meat... was eaten on special occasions and only the wealthy could afford meat more often because meat is expensive to produce and takes a lot of resources.

Many people in the U.S. consume most of the meat available today compared to other countries. Andrews says the U.S. consumes 124 kilograms per capita per year, while India, for example, consumes about 4 kilograms per person per year. This has occurred in the last 50 to 60 years.

Concerningmore mainstreammedia, there are many recipe books, food blogs and Food Network shows that are showing people how to cook vegan meals while educating the importance of this diet. This diet is also diverse, ranging from all genders, age groups and races who are consuming more fruits and vegetables.

The popularity has grown so much that many restaurants are providing options for people to continue their diet. Fast food chains such as Burger King and KFC have changed their menu to include more vegan-friendly options. Colleges have also adjusted their dining meals to vegan and plant-based options for their students to pick from.

After breaking her ACL from sports, Vegan Knees owner, creator and photographer Keesha Ward noticed after a few years of eating a plant-based diet she did not have any health concerns.

I got a letter in a mail from the hospital saying that they were going to drop me, and I was like why am I coming in like Im fine, Ward said. My body felt different. Even though I did it for my knees I did it for my future without looking back.

Many people have ongoing questions about being vegan or plant-based, including where to start.It'simportant to know what is going into the body rather than buying it beforehand.

Your goal is to listen to your body and the signals that it is giving you because that will tell you exactly what the foods are doing to you, Ward said.

Eating plant-based or vegan can not only improve diets, but the environment as well. While experiencing this COVID-19 pandemic, we are starting to see how quickly the environment has changed since everyone has been social distancing.

Meat-packing plants and food distribution factories have employees that are constantly being overworked. This causes damaging and excessive pollution to the air.

Because our environment can not really sustain people eating mass amounts of meat and dairy any longer, three meals a day of animal products are affecting the environment, said Lyssa Wade, the owner of Veggie Thumper. "Now that we are experiencing pandemics, were starting to see how poorly workers are treated, people are starting to realize things. We kind of lost touch with the land because people are so reliant on everything being so fast and readily available."

Even though it may be hard and you might want to give it up, its OK. The first time is not the last time.

Being plant-based and vegan is not for everybody, but it is a good place to start a healthy diet if it is the best choice for you.

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How veganism and other plant-based diets are becoming mainstream - Iowa State Daily

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Behind the Menu | From-scratch Ethiopian fare offered at Nile Vegan – The Columbus Dispatch

Located on the south end of the University District, the Ethiopian restaurant offers inexpensive, scratch-made fare. Although misconceptions abound, vegan fare does not necessarily mean light fare, owner Siyum Tefera said.

In central Ohios growing ethnic dining scene, Nile Vegan will have a familiar appeal to some and be a truly adventuresome dining experience for others.

Located on the south end of the University District, the Ethiopian restaurant offers inexpensive, scratch-made fare.

Although misconceptions abound, vegan fare does not necessarily mean light fare, owner Siyum Tefera said.

"I would say our food is very filling," Tefera said.

Most entrees are served with injera, a style of unbaked flatbread made from teft flour that ferments for three days.

The coiled piece of bread is sponge-like in texture and tangy in flavor, meant to scoop up the food on the plate.

Yes, that means eating with ones hands is preferred at Nile Vegan.

The mushroom stew ($9.99) offers cremini and button mushrooms sauteed in vegan butter (coconut, avocado and grapeseed oil) with peppers, tomatoes and onions and berbere spices, a dry mixture of chile peppers, black pepper, dried ginger, dried garlic and salt, common in many dishes.

By and large, Nile Vegans dishes arent substantially spicy, according to Teferas standards.

The curry vegetable medley ($7.99) offers a broad range of textural notes with cabbage, potatoes and carrots, plus onion and garlic, and a yellow hue from turmeric plus a bite from jalapeno.

"I would say its very tolerable, he said. "We actually get quite a few requests, asking us to make it spicier."

The restaurant dips into popular territory for those on a no-meat, non-dairy diet.

Kale ($9.99), the green goddess of modern veganism, is stewed in tomatoes, onions and other seasonings, along with ground chickpeas, which cook down to a consistency smoother than hummus.

With the "specialty" tofu ($9.99), the dehydrated bean curd is cut into cubes and stewed in the rich, ubiquitous spice mixture, leaving the protein with a firm texture.

Combination platters, featuring smaller portions of up to four entrees, are available as well.

The restaurant has temporarily stopped serving breakfast but plans to resume those hours in the next few weeks, in plenty of time for incoming Ohio State University students, Tefera said.

The business took a hit from the coronavirus pandemic but has rebounded lately, he said.

"Its been pretty decent," he said. "Were starting to get things rolling again."

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Behind the Menu | From-scratch Ethiopian fare offered at Nile Vegan - The Columbus Dispatch

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Vegan restaurant Neon Tiger opens on King Street with plant-based drinks, pizzas and a look into the future – Charleston City Paper

Neon Tiger is John Adamson's newest project, a moody and mysterious upper King Street spot that has him focusing on growing the vegan food community in Charleston after making a name for himself with engaging restaurant design at popular Charleston destinations like The Rarebit.

Opening an entirely plant-based restaurant and cocktail bar is more than just a business endeavor for Adamson, who previously owned The Rarebit along with The Americano, a Cuban-themed Mount Pleasant eatery that closed in 2017. According to the restaurateur, he spent most of his life as a meat-eating American until 2017 when he first experienced what vegans call "making the connection" between animals and the meat on your plate.

"I had never even considered any form of veganism or vegetarianism before I made the connection, but once I did, I instantly went vegan," Adamson said. "And, I also simultaneously became an activist."

This newly found calling to advocate for veganism, a diet that avoids animal-derived food and products tested on animals, is driving the cuisine at Neon Tiger. Look for an entirely vegan cocktail menu paired with an innovative assortment of dishes created by Toronto-based chef Doug McNish who has worked on vegan menus at restaurants in Canada, the United States, Europe and Australia. Currently, the restaurant is operating with limited offerings featuring pizzas, sides and salads while McNish is stuck in Canada due to COVID-19. But in the coming months, the full menu is set to have vegan versions of pasta, tacos, burgers, crab cakes, mac and cheese and desserts.

An early favorite has been the fried "shrimp" made from konjac, a high-fiber herb that grows in parts of Asia. Pizzas are made using non-GMO flour and topped with an assortment of vegetables and proteins like crispy soy bacon and seitan pepperoni.

"Making vegan meat substitutes is really about the texture and the flavors," Adamson said. "Now, we can replicate the texture and we can absolutely replicate the flavor."

"I was so excited about this place as a consumer," said Neon Tiger general manager Isabelle Maloney. "Because there isn't a place in Charleston where you can go and not have to wonder if the bartenders are using egg whites or Worcestershire. To be able to come in as a vegan, vegetarian or just someone who's curious and know that you can pick off the entire menu is really exciting."

Adamson's plans for Neon Tiger's local footprint are lofty, as he hopes the restaurant can be more than just a place to go for healthy, delicious cuisine and cocktails. Currently, he is in the process of getting the restaurant classified as a B Corporation, which would make it one of only three in South Carolina. B Corps are part regular corporation and part nonprofit, keeping consumers informed about the way the business spends its money.

Adamson will start by contributing a percentage of profits to the Agriculture Fairness Alliance, an organization working to give the vegan community a voice in debates over agricultural policy.

Adamson says the impact of animal agriculture on the world's oceans inspired Neon Tiger's eclectic decor. The dark colors, retro futuristic murals and eye-catching plant wall are all meant to depict what the world might look like in 2048 the year when some experts believe oceans will be dead due to pollution and climate change.

"Neon Tiger is supposed to be a glitch in the matrix," Adamson said.

The current menu is just a small taste of what Neon Tiger plans to offer, and Adamson hopes Charleston can catch up to other cities with a strong vegan presence. Unlike cities which boast dozens of vegan restaurants Toronto, Los Angeles and New York City Charleston has very few all-vegan options.

"The vegan community is growing every day," said Maloney. "And, in terms of other cities, I think Charleston is very behind especially for being such a culinary destination and a food and bev town."

Adamson and Maloney hope to clear the way for more vegan restaurants as Charlestonians begin to venture into Neon Tiger for a pia colada with oat milk or an old fashioned with date syrup and stay for a bite of something delicious.

For the time being, the restaurant is only open for takeout 5-9 p.m., but follow @neon_tiger_ on Instagram to get the scoop on the dining room's opening date and expanded menu.

Read the original here:
Vegan restaurant Neon Tiger opens on King Street with plant-based drinks, pizzas and a look into the future - Charleston City Paper

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis – Wicked Local Franklin

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are on the Nirvana Tea House & Caf's menu, all researched by Shift Manager Kelly Harris. The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally friendly and pay their workers fairly, said owner Ed Williamson, and its teas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

MILLIS Thirteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas, Franklin resident Ed Williamson, his hiking guide, a horseman and a cook set up and broke down tents across the mountain for 10 days last year. They never had to worry about finding a stranger living in a tent on that mountain in Bhutan who wasn't willing to invite them in for a cup of tea.

That welcome over a cup of tea, remind Williamson of his childhood.

The tea was just a way to talk, said Williamson, who grew up in Cork, Ireland, with a mother who lit a burner for the teapot whenever company was invited over.

Anyone that came to visit the teapot went on," he said."I grew up drinking tea; coffee was not something we drank. That whole (experience drinking tea with strangersin theHimalayas) reminded me of home.

Its a concept and a feeling hes infused in opening his own vegan caf and tea house in Millis. He opened Nirvana Tea House & Caf, at 969 Main St., in late June with the help of his three managers - General Manager Keith Maher and Shift Managers Tamra Saegh and Kelly Harris, who came up with the cafs name.

The word nirvana is really about being in a happy place, said Williamson.

Williamson said the vegan and plant-based caf was slated to open earlier this spring, but halfway through completion, the coronavirus pandemic hit.

But if we can survive in this, well do all right, said Williamson, who also owns the Pathways Wellness Center next to the tea house where he teaches tai chi, meditation andmindful living classes. The space where the caf sits was once his studio where he taught classes.

From "meat and potatoes tolentils and quinoa

Growing up in Ireland, Williamson was raised on a meat and potatoes diet, he said, and he rarely ate any pasta. He moved to the United States at 23 to find work as a carpenter, first living in Westwood for a week then moving out to Medway in 1985 for a job.

About half a year later he moved to Franklin, where hes lived for the last 35 years. He has his own construction business in town - called Impressions Building Corp. and these last few months during the pandemic haveresulted in lots of work, he said.

Its been crazy busy, everyone that I know in the construction business is doing fine, he said, explaining that he mainly works on remodeling and home additions. He became a vegetarian 11 years ago when his then 12-year-old daughter said she wanted to become avegetarian, and that her father should, too.

I thought Id miss (animal products) but I dont, he said. Theres so much good stuff to eat thats vegan.

Veganism was a rare topic of conversation in Ireland when he left in 1985, he said. But last October, he returned to the country and there weremore vegan eateries in his hometown of Cork than in the Milford region.

Satisfying cravings

He wondered if a local vegan placewould ever open in the area.

Because then I dont have to worry about what Im choosing, said Williamson, who was also an avid tea house customer. He especially loves the Dobr tea franchise, butits closest location is in Northampton.

The caf offers a range of vegan bowls, salads and wraps, from the "baba buddha wrap," which features hummus, baba ganoush, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, Kalamata olives andred onion with a side of dressed mixed greens, to the lentil love bowl, made with organic white rice, stewed lentils, carrot saut, celery, golden raisins, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, purple cabbage, radishes and coconut curry dressing.

Some of its ingredients are sourced from Tangerini's Farm in Millis, which also makes treats for the caf based off recipes from Mahar. Currently, those treats include lemon poppy seed matcha bread, chai cakes and blueberry ginger scones.

But thecaf isnt just for vegan customers, Williamson said. Regular meat-eaters will also enjoy what they have to offer.

His non-vegetarian accountant came in to try the cafs Mediterranean platter the other day, which is served with baba ganoush, a mashed eggplant blended with tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and salt. It was the first time he had tried the concoction.

Hes hooked on it now, said Williamson.

Many individually selected teas

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are offered on the cafs menu, all researched by Harris.Those teas include black, green, chai, Earl Grey, herbal, oolong, purple, rooibos, white, yellow, iced and tea lattes.

The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally friendly and pay their workers fairly,said Williamson, and itsteas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

In some of those places in Africa, a path for elephants to pass through the farm has been constructed by workers to make space for them as they migrate. Williamson said they even know some of the names of workers on these farms.

Tea is served to customers at their tables, and at full capacity, seating is offered for about 25 to 30 people,he said.Currently, because of the pandemic, only about half that much indoor seating is available, with another dozen or so seats outside.

Inside is a hand-painted mural of a tea farm by Norfolk artist Jason Sawtelle of BlackBeak studios, who also designed the cafs logo. On the floor are two colorful rugs with swirling dragons that he was told once sat inside the office of the king of Bhutan, a country located in the eastern Himalayas south of Tibet.

Williamsonwas given them by his Himalayan guide who said the rugs were being tossed out of the office because they were too small.

Workersdont accept tips at the caf, said Williamson, stating that he paysthem more than minimum wage at $17 an hour. For those who want to tip, himself and managers are narrowing down three charities for customers to donate to one for hunger relief, another to support the environment and the other to promote human justice. Customers can choose which charity they want to donate to.

The Nirvana Tea House & Caf is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Lauren Young writes about politics, social issues and covers the town of Franklin. Reach her at 774-804-1499 or lyoung@wickedlocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @laurenatmilford.

Link:
Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis - Wicked Local Franklin

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson

Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis – MetroWest Daily News

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are served on the Nirvana Tea House & Caf's menu, all researched by Shift Manager Kelly Harris. The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally-friendly and pay their workers fairly, said Owner Ed Williamson, and its teas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

MILLIS Thirteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas, Franklin resident Ed Williamson, his hiking guide, a horseman and a cook set up and broke down tents across the mountain for 10 days last year. They never had to worry about finding a stranger living in a tent on that mountain in Bhutan who wasn't willing to invite them in for a cup of tea.

That welcome over a cup of tea, remind Williamson of his childhood.

The tea was just a way to talk, said Williamson who grew up in Cork, Ireland, with a mother who lit a burner for the teapot whenever company was invited over.

Anyone that came to visit the tea pot went on," he said."I grew up drinking tea, coffee was not something we drank. That whole (experience drinking tea with strangersin theHimalayas) reminded me of home.

Its a concept and a feeling hes infused in opening his own vegan caf and tea house in Millis. He opened Nirvana Tea House & Caf, at 969 Main St., in late June with the help of his three managers - General Manager Keith Maher and Shift Managers Tamra Saegh and Kelly Harris, who came up with the cafs name.

The word nirvana is really about being in a happy place, said Williamson.

Williamson said the vegan and plant-based caf was slated to open earlier this spring, but halfway through completion, the coronavirus pandemic hit.

But if we can survive in this, well do alright, said Williamson, who also owns the Pathways Wellness Center next to the tea house where he teaches tai chi, meditation andmindful living classes. The space where the caf sits was once his studio where he taught classes.

From "meat and potatoes tolentils and quinoa

Growing up in Ireland, Williamson was raised on a meat and potatoes diet, he said, and rarely ate any pasta. He moved to the United States at 23 to find work as a carpenter, first living in Westwood for a week then moving out to Medway in 1985 for a job.

About half a year later he moved to Franklin, where hes lived for the last 35 years. He has his own construction business in town - called Impressions Building Corp. and these last few months during the pandemic haveresulted in lots of work, he said.

Its been crazy busy, everyone that I know in the construction business is doing fine, he said, working mainly on remodeling and home additions. He became a vegetarian 11 years ago when his then 12-year-old daughter,said she waswanted to become avegetarian, and that her father should too.

I thought Id miss (animal products) but I dont, he said. Theres so much good stuff to eat thats vegan.

Veganism was a rare topic of conversation in Ireland when he left in 1985, he said. But last October, he returned to the country and there weremore vegan eateries in his hometown of Cork than in the Milford region.

Satisfying cravings

He wondered if a local vegan placewould ever open in the area.

Because then I dont have to worry about what Im choosing, said Williamson, also an avid tea house customer. He especially loves the Dobr tea franchise, butits closest location is in Northampton.

The caf offers a range of vegan bowls, salads and wraps, from the baba buddha wrap, which features hummus, baba ganoush, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, kalamata olives andred onion with a side of dressed mixed greens, to the lentil love bowl, made with organic white rice, stewed lentils, carrot saut, celery, golden raisins, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach, purple cabbage, radishes and coconut curry dressing.

Some of its ingredients travel from Tangerini's Farm in Millis, which also makes treats for the caf based off recipes from Mahar. Currently, those treats include lemon poppy seed matcha bread, chai cakes and blueberry ginger scones.

But thecaf isnt just for vegan customers, Williamson said regular meat-eaters will also enjoy what they have to offer.

His non-vegetarian accountant came in to try the cafs Mediterranean platter the other day, which is served with baba ganoush, a mashed eggplant blended with tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and salt. It was the first time he had tried the concoction.

Hes hooked on it now, said Williamson.

Many individually selected teas

After test-tasting over 100 teas from across the globe, 42 are served on the cafs menu, all researched by Harris.Those teas include black, green, chai, Earl Grey, herbal, oolong, purple, rooibos, white, yellow, iced and tea lattes.

The caf only sources from tea farms that are environmentally-friendly and pay their workers fairly,said Williamson, and itsteas have traveled from places like South Africa, India, Argentina, Indonesia, Taiwan and Rwanda.

In some of those places in Africa, a path for elephants to pass through the farm has been constructed by workers to make space for them as they migrate through. Williamson said they even know some of the names of workers on these farms.

Tea is served to customers at their tables, and at full capacity, seating is offered for about 25 to 30 people,he said.Currently only about half that much seating is available during the pandemic, with another dozen or so seats outside.

Inside is a hand-painted mural of a tea farm by Norfolk-based artist Jason Sawtelle of BlackBeak studios, who also designed the cafs logo. On the floor are two colorful rugs with swirling dragons that once sat inside the king of Bhutans office, a country located near Nepal and above Bangladesh.

Williamsonwas given them by his Himalayan guide who said the rugs were being tossed out of the office because they were too small.

Workersdont accept tips at the caf, said Williamson, stating that he paysthem more than minimum wage at $17 an hour. For those who want to tip, himself and managers are narrowing down three charities for customers to donate to one for hunger relief, another to support the environment and the other to promote human justice. Customers can choose which charity they want to donate to.

The Nirvana Tea House & Caf is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Lauren Young writes about politics, social issues and covers the town of Franklin. Reach her at 774-804-1499 or lyoung@wickedlocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @laurenatmilford.

Excerpt from:
Franklin resident opens the vegan-focused Nirvana Tea House & Caf in Millis - MetroWest Daily News

Recommendation and review posted by Alexandra Lee Anderson


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